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Champs-Elysées restaurants

Our recommendations for the best restaurants near the Champs-Elysées

1/12

On the classic glamorous shopping avenue in Paris, you're sure to find some superior restaurants. Click on the arrow above to start exploring some of our favourites. Think we've missed a great restaurant near the Champs Elysées? Let us know in the comment box below.

2/12

The sheer glamour factor would be enough to recommend this restaurant, Alain Ducasse's most lofty Paris undertaking. The dining room ceiling drips with 10,000 crystals. An amuse-bouche of a single langoustine in a lemon cream with a touch of Iranian caviar starts the meal off beautifully, but other dishes can be inconsistent: a part-raw/part-cooked salad of autumn fruit and veg in a red, Chinese-style sweet-and-sour dressing, or Breton lobster in an overwhelming sauce of apple, quince and spiced wine. Cheese is predictably delicious, as is the rum baba comme à Monte-Carlo.

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3/12

With a menu of some 23 different champagnes and designer decor (slick wooden panelling, blue walls and red velvet), Paris's first champagne lounge may be miniscule, but it certainly looks the part. Indeed the only indication that it's not French (it's American) is the sneaky appearance of a Californian sparkler on the champagne list. For drinkers wishing to sample different vintages without buying a whole glass (from €9), the small tasting glasses (from €5) are a thoughtful touch. And for anyone bored by plain old bubbly, cocktails such as champagne sangria and Rossini-Tini (champagne, raspberry juice, liqueur and Grey Goose vodka) make sophisticated alternatives.

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4/12

This épicerie with a difference is the perfect remedy for anyone for whom the word 'terroir' conjures up visions of grease-soaked peasant food. Here, the walls heave with more than 600 enticing specialities from southern France, including Périgord foie gras, charcuterie from Aubrac and a fine selection of wines. Great gift ideas – but why not sample some of the goodies by enjoying the midday table d'hôte feast? Come in early to ensure that you can choose from the five succulent plats du jour (such as marinated salmon with dill on a bed of warm potatoes).

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5/12

Serge Barbey's dining room has a refreshingly feminine touch. The emphasis here is firmly on good-quality ingredients, skilfully prepared to show off their freshness. In spring, stalks of asparagus from the Landes are expertly trimmed to avoid any trace of stringiness and served with the simplest vinaigrette d'herbes. More extravagant is the foie gras cuit au torchon, in which the duck liveris wrapped in a cloth and poached in a bouillon. Skip the crème brûlée, which you could have anywhere, and order a dessert with attitude instead: the giant baba au rhum.

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6/12

Decadence permeates this elegant tearoom, from the 19th century-style interior and service to the labyrinthine corridors that lead to the toilets. While you bask in the warm glow of bygone wealth, indulge in tea, pastries (the pistachio pain au chocolat is heavenly) and, above all, the hot chocolate. It's a rich, bitter, velvety tar that will leave you in the requisite stupor for any lazy afternoon.

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7/12

Ever since it opened, this snug bistro has been packed with a happy crowd of bistro-lovers who appreciate Japanese-born chef Hide Kobayashi's superb cooking and good-value prices. Expect dishes such as duck foie gras terrine with pear-and-thyme compôte to start, followed by tender faux-filet steak in a light foie gras sauce or skate wing with a lemon-accented beurre noisette. Desserts are excellent: perfect tarte tatin comes with crème fraîche from Normandy. Good, affordable wines explain the merriment, including a glass of the day for €2.

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8/12

Le Rostand has a truly wonderful view of the Jardins du Luxembourg from its classy interior, decked out with Oriental paintings, a long mahogany bar and wall-length mirrors. It's a terribly well-behaved place and you should definitely consider arriving in fur or designer sunglasses if you want to fit in with the regulars. The drinks list is lined with whiskies and cocktails, pricey but not as steep as the brasserie menu. Still, with a heated terrace in winter, it's perfect for a civilised drink after a quick spin round the gardens.

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9/12

This is a welcome new-wave bistro in an area where eating options tend to be fashion haunts, grand tables or tourist traps. Owner-chef Laurent Zajac uses quality seasonal ingredients, giving them a personal spin in dishes such as scallops with curry spices and artichoke hearts, classic veal sweetbreads with wild asparagus, and an exotic take on île flottante. Popular with ministry of interior types at lunch, quieter by night.

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10/12

Prices here are not as shocking as in some restaurants at this level; there's a €80 lunch menu. Rémoulade de coquilles St-Jacques is a technical feat, with slices of raw, marinated scallop wrapped in a tube shape around a finely diced apple filling, encircled by a mayonnaise-like rémoulade sauce. An earthier and lip-smacking dish is the trademark épeautre – an ancient wheat – cooked 'like a risotto' with bone marrow, black truffle, whipped cream and parmesan, and topped with sautéed frog's legs. Ravioli au chocolat araguani is a surprising and wonderful dessert.

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11/12
© EP

Fans of the fashionable trend for preserving, head straight to Boco. The Ferniot brothers, inspired by their memories of their grandmother’s dishes, had the brilliant idea of capturing the recipes of top chefs in preserving jars and now dishes by Anne-Sophie Pic, Frédéric Bau, Christophe Michalak, Philippe Conticini and more are sitting pretty in glass containers (€4 to €9). They work variously as lunch boxes, microwaveable meals or dishes to be warned in a bain-marie. The preservation method offers better texture and flavour than plastic wrapping; the risotto with macaroni, cepes and cheese by Emmanuel Renaut that we tried, though slightly under-seasoned, was beautifully tender and creamy, if on the small side. A delicious dark chocolate mousse by Gilles Goujon was more generous. All ingredients are foraged or organic, and you can also eat your pot on size or go for an excellent croque monsieur (€5.50).

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12/12

On the edge of the Seine, with tall bay windows overlooking the Eiffel Tower, and chic grey and mauve décor, Antoine is a shrine to the sea – albeit a posh one!  Moneyed crowds from the nearby Triangle d’Or gather day and night to sample chef Mickaël Feval’s perfect-every-time oysters and extravagant dishes like whole roasted lobster served with winter vegetable en cocotte, plump St-Jacques scallops, and thick, fish-rich Bouillabaisse (fish soup) served with saffron tinted rouille (garlicky mayonnaise). Dessert wise, expect all sorts of chocolate creations and a delicious vanilla mille-feuille with crispy layers that crunch into lashings of vanilla cream. If you’re not out for the whole splurge, try the more reasonable fixed-price lunch menu. At night the price tag rides over €100 per person but you won’t be disappointed – especially when the Eiffel tower sparkles just beyond your dinner plate.

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Shopping on the Champs-Elysées

In 1969, hoary French crooner Joe Dassin released 'Les Champs-Elysées', a perfect piece of cheesy French chanson with the lyrics 'in the sunshine, in the rain, in the dark or in the day, all you need's on the Champs-Elysées'. The song captured the role of the avenue at the time as one of the most fashionable and eclectic streets in Paris. But during the '90s the 'Champs' lost its magic, becoming smothered in offices, car showrooms, overpriced eateries, run-of-the-mill shops and fume-pumping traffic jams. Novelty megastores FNAC and Virgin failed to overcome its new déclassé status, leaving the formerly glamorous avenue to the mercy of tourists and businessmen.Since 2011, however, things have been looking up. The congestion, the tourists, the showrooms and the daylight robbery restaurants are all still there, of course. But several mainstream fashion brands – Banana Republic, Levi's, Hugo Boss, Abercrombie & Fitch and even Marks & Spencer's – have chosen to locate exciting new flagship stores on the Champs, luring Parisians back to their long-neglected capital of consumer chic. More than just high street shops, these brands are promising unique shopping experiences: cutting-edge art installations at Levi's, daytime clubbing at Abercrombie & Fitch or free personalised shopping at Banana Republic. So now that the Champs-Elysées are calling fashionable Parisian shoppers back again, we've put together a guide to help you stay ahead of the curve... Five recommended Champs-Elysées shops Banana Republic The American megabrand’s grown-up preppy style has finally arrived in Paris. Its neo-Art Déco style, 1,500 square metre, Champs-Elysées flagship features a multitude of mini-boutiques within the larger store. Themed sections include Weekend (casual separates), the eco-friendly Heritage collection and the higher-end Monogram range. One big draw is the free personal shopping service, with absolutely no requirement to buy. Reserve in advance, and Magali or Lee (who head the service) will take you round the shop to help tailor your look. This also gives you access to your own (and rather lovely) 1930s-style dressing room away from the throng. For extra fizz and sparkle, they'll even serve you champagne and coffee. Abercrombie & Fitch This is a case of having to be seen to be believed. The US clothing brand's flagship store has been causing a stir on the Champs-Elysées since it opened in 2011, with banging tunes and topless male models standing in the doorway at all times. Like its sister stores in London and NYC, the aristocratic box-hedged garden, dimmed lighting and lingering aftershave scent make the place feel more like a bizarre club than a shop. There are even bouncers ready to tell you off should you dare whip out your camera for a photo op. A shame, because the décor is positively museum-worthy, with beautifully painted 1930s-style frescoes depicting male deities in hunting scenes, athletic poses and boxing rings.Things get even sillier with the Barbie-and-Ken-like shop attendants. Veritable A&F clones, they all dress the same – coloured jeans or shorts and chequered shirts for the boys, and strapless mini-dresses for the girls – and dance on the spot, on autopilot, to the clubbing music. Still, whether you’re into Abercombie & Fitch’s rah-rah schoolboy ranges or not, the shop is well worth a detour – if only to admire the frescoes. Just be prepared to queue to get in! Marks & Spencer People queuing in the rain for Marks and Spencer’s? Has the world gone mad? Or is George Clooney giving away free luxury hampers? As odd as it may seem to Brits (for whom M&S is as about as exotic as its signature multi-packs of pants) queuing outside is business as usual for M&S since the chain opened its new flagship Paris store in November 2011. Paradoxically, while the majority of the French love nothing more than criticizing British food, give them a Marks and Spencer’s chicken-tikka sarnie, a pack of scones or a treacle pudding and the superlatives flow like wine from a barrel. They’re also secret admirers of British fashion, and M&S has always fulfilled a French need for classicism whilst offering them cuts, colours and fabric types you don’t readily find in France. So much so that when Marks closed down its first Paris stores ten years ago (including a huge shop on Boulevard Haussmann, a location the chain would now kill for), many Parisians practically went into mourning.As the queues suggest, this Champs-Elysées address (which opened in November 2011 and offers clothes and food ranges) is perhaps too small. But it's still the only M&S in central Paris, and therefore an address for fans of the chain to cherish – at least until a vast 7000m2 store is opens in Levallois-Perret before the end of 2012. Hugo Boss Hugo Boss’ new flagship store on the Champs Elysées is all straight lines and steely greys – rather like the signature Boss suits worn by the sales assistants. It feels like businessman territory here, with minimalist décor, the occasional wooden sculpture and big screens flashing images of Hugo Boss catwalk shows – inspiration for your shopping as you browse the minimalist rows of the brand’s smart, designer garb. Boss has other outlets dotted around town, but this is its biggest store and perhaps the most relaxing, thanks to its large and airy proportions. Personal shoppers are on hand too, ready to guide you through the ranges and advise on style. Levi's Levi's has always had good marketing strategies: the campaigns that included the Motown classic 'I Heard it through the Grapevine', Steve Miller Band's 'The Joker' and Mr Oizo's 'Flat Beat' (performed by the yellow puppet Flat Eric) are undoubtedly some of the most memorable ads of our time. So it should come as no surprise that the chain is using music and art to draw the crowds into its brand spanking new (in May 2012) flagship store on the Champs-Elysées.The campaign, which goes by the name of 'Vive les Friends', offers shoppers an ever-changing multi-disciplinary in-shop experience, courtesy of different French and American artists and musicians (kick-starting the campaign in May were Ed Banger’s Pedro Winter and LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy). It makes shopping wholly more entertaining and gives folk a reason to keep coming back – not only to discover the new artworks, but to see the limited-edition clothes: each Franco-American duo featured creates a series of funky, limited-edition t-shirts and personalised Levi’s 1967 Trucker’s jackets.If it's just jeans your after, head straight downstairs, where floor to celing walls are filled with perfectly folded 501s, skinnys and bootleg models, like a many-hued blue sweet shop for denim lovers.

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Arc de Triomphe: An insider's guide

The Arc de Triomphe is the iconic centrepiece of traffic-heavy place de l'Etoile (the meeting point of twelve, elegant, Haussmannian avenues including the Champs Elysées) and a must-see for first-time visitors. But that doesn't mean you have to sightsee like a fresher. The area is both a heaving business and residential district, frequented by well-healed Parisians who love nothing more than avoiding the tourist crowds. Follow in their footsteps with our list of the best places to shop, eat, drink and sightsee around the Arc de Triomphe. Click here for more information on the arch. Around the Arc de Triomphe... Museum: Musée Jacquemart-André Long terrace steps and a pair of stone lions usher visitors into this grand 19th-century mansion, home to a collection of objets d'art and fine paintings. The collection was assembled by Edouard André and his artist wife Nélie Jacquemart, using money inherited from his rich banking family. The mansion was built to order to house their art hoard, which includes Rembrandts, Tiepolo frescoes and various paintings by Italian masters Uccello, Mantegna and Carpaccio.The adjacent tearoom, with its fabulous tottering cakes, is a favourite with the smart, Champs Elysées lunch set. Museum: Musée Cernuschi From the Arc de Triomphe, head down avenue de Wagram to Ternes, then take boulevard de Courcelles to the beautiful, neo-classical Parc Monceau. On it's east side lies one of the city's best kept secrets, the Musée Cernuschi: Since the banker Henri Cernuschi built a hôtel particulier by the Parc Monceau for the treasures he found in the Far East in 1871, this collection of Chinese art has grown steadily. The fabulous displays range from legions of Han and Wei dynasty funeral statues to refined Tang celadon wares and Sung porcelain. Restaurant: La Fermette Marbeuf La Fermette Marbeuf 1900 restaurant in Paris just a few steps from the Avenue George V and the Champs-Elysees is also the shortest route into Belle Epoque Paris of a century ago. This jewel of a restaurant, dating from 1898, was rediscovered in the course of renovation thirty years ago and it must have been like opening King Tut’s tomb. There are wonderful things here: Art Nouveau mosaic and stained glass sunflowers, peacocks, dragonflies, beautiful women, cast iron pillars, and a soaring glass ceiling. Chef Gilbert Isaac mainly sticks to French classic dishes, like chicken liver pate with onion marmalade, whole grilled seabass flamed in anise, and rhum babas. This is a hotspot for celebrity France to see and be seen. Restaurant: Philippe et Jean Pierre If you're looking for a decently-priced, semi-gastronomic meal just off the Champs Elysées follow the suits and high-heels to Philippe et Jean Pierre, a beautiful art deco restaurant with a very local clientele. Orchestrated by Philippe Garon, the service is elegant and attentive, while Jean Pierre Brault creates generous plates of sunny, Mediterranean food in the kitchen - think roast langoustine ravioli, fresh anchovy tart with parmesan ‘lacing’, and oysters salted with Avruga caviar in raspberry vinegar. Heavenly! Pub: Sir Winston Sir Winston is one of the oldest English pubs in Paris, ensconced just around the corner from the Arc de Triomphe. Though the Champs Elysees professionals who pack this chicly eccentric bar are too young to recall the place's namesake, they clearly appreciate the delicious colonial-style refit: deep leather Chesterfields in the Indian smoke lounge, cigar smoke in the red-walled smoking room, and a leopard skin rug in the darkwood bar. Sir Winston’s faux-fur covered basement booths are the kind of place James Bond would take a date at 3am for martinis and seduction to the sound of chill-out tunes. There are outside pavement café tables to sip hot chocolate and look cool at, too. And the fine food is Indian-based. Bar: Charlie Birdy Not a reference to Charlie Parker, but to Winston Churchill’s parrot. A stone’s throw from the Arc de Triomphe, this enormous pub is a cross between a New York loft and a colonial gentleman’s club, attracting many a tourist and ex-pat. There’s a regular programme of jazz, blues, folk and funk gigs with reasonable prices for the area, and it has the distinct advantage of staying open until 5am daily. For live concerts, or to follow football and rugby matches on giant screens, you hang out on comfortable Chesterfield sofas. On the menu, the unmatched burger is always good value – huge, impossibly tender and served with fantastic chips – but it’s best to give the fajitas and tapas a miss. For drinks, try something from the huge cocktail menu, preferably during happy hour – 4pm to 8pm Monday to Friday – though if you’re in a hurry come back another time, as the service can be slow.Charlie Birdy is famous for its enormous if unrefined Gospel & Soul brunch at €19. With the menu ‘à l'américaine’, you’ll get a hot drink, fruit juice, pastries, bread, butter and jam, followed by a main course: hash browns, boiled eggs and bacon, a salmon and cream cheese bagel or a Caesar salad. Then a sterling dessert menu: cheesecake, pancake, chocolate cake or – more original – a fresh fruit minestrone.There are two other branches of this bar in Paris: Charlie Birdy Montparnasse and Charlie Birdy Commerce, which only stays open until 5 on the weekends. Shop: Alléosse If you're a fan of walk-off-your plate cheese do not miss Alléosse (10-minutes from the Arc de Triomphe on foot), where varieties from almost every French region are represented. People cross town for these cheeses - wonderful farmhouse camemberts, delicate st-marcellins, a choice of chèvres and several rarities. Alléosse is also in a handy spot for exploring the covered market near Ternes (head up rue Bayen). Shop: Byzance Champs-Élysées A place to go piggy in: Spanish hams here have the Bellota-Bellota label, meaning that the pigs have been allowed to feast on acorns. Manager Philippe Poulachon compares his cured hams (€98 a kilo) to the delicacy of truffles. Restaurant Bellota-Bellota (18 rue Jean-Nicot, 7th, 01.53.59.96.96) also sells the hams at its adjoining épicerie.

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Brunches for gourmands

CHEZ CASIMIRWhere? In the 10th arrondissement, next to Gare du Nord. When? Saturdays and Sundays, 10am-7pm. How much? €26. In brief: Delicious and plentiful – a must. Thierry Breton, owner of Chez Michel and of this bistrot next door, takes the idea of generous servings to extremes. Here, this doesn’t mean an American brunch experience – instead Chez Casimir lays on ‘le Traou Mad’ (meaning ‘good things’ in Breton), served continually from 10am to 7pm. You can fill your plate with delicious fare from Brittany and elsewhere, starting in simple fashion, with salted butter on exceptional country bread, and moving on to just about everything else: charcuterie, seafood, boudin, smoked salmon, salads, omelettes… Then come the casseroles of flaked cod, the beef bourguignon or similarly hearty dishes. Still hungry? Head towards the ‘grandmother-style’ dessert buffet. The atmosphere is noisy but convivial and the price (€26) is incredible in light of the quality. Not hard, then, to understand the place’s success.
AW 6 rue de Belzunce, 10e – 01.48.78.28.80 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • LES BONNES SOEURSWhere? In the 3rd arrondissement, next to the Place des Vosges. When? Saturdays and Sundays, noon-6pm (from 11am on Sunday). How much? €23. In brief: Generous portions, good quality-to-price ratio. This is a tiny, noisy room, which regularly has people queuing down the Place des Vosges on a Sunday morning. It’s worth getting there early on weekends so you’ll be in pole position to sample the succulent scrambled eggs served as part of the legendary brunch. There are no reservations, but they do operate a waiting list – so be prepared to take a long walk around the block before you’re able to enjoy your breakfast. But it’s probably worth it to work up your appetite. The décor is restrained – wooden tables, leather benches and black and white photos of nuns (the titular ‘good sisters’) – but the meals are a merciful blessing for the famished. To kick off, a basket of fresh bread and brioches with chocolate sprinkles arrives with a delicious but meagre fresh fruit juice. Then come the pancakes with maple syrup and scrambled eggs accompanied by crunchy chips, salmon and grilled bacon. And to satisfy really big appetites, for around €4 more gourmands can add the sumptuous eggs Benedict, after which they can take the rest of the day off food – and most of the following one too. EP 8 Rue du Pas de la Mule, 3e - 01.42.74.55.80 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • NOLITA Where? In the 8th arrondissement, on the Champs-Elysées roundabout. When? Sundays, 11am-4pm. How much? €39. In brief: Italian-style brunch, delicious buffet, generous portions – but expensive. Diehard devotees of scrambled eggs and bacon will search in vain for British comfort food here. Nolita’s unrivalled ‘brunch à l’italienne’ is a lavish, Latin buffet that’s a world away from a London fry-up: melting mozzarella, carpaccio of swordfish, Parmesan shavings on a bed of bresaola, soft sliced ​​octopus, subtly marinated vegetables, sundried tomatoes… The freshness and refinement will delight anyone who’s keeping an eye on their calorie intake. But those with a hankering for something heavier need not worry: Nolita also offers breaded saffron rice dumplings, stuffed focaccia and the choice of two hot dishes (moist lasagne or steaming cannelloni). To complete the Italian experience, there is a healthy spread of desserts: tiramisu, panna cotta, walnut pie, fresh fruit and cornetti (croissants filled with cream or jam). So, enough here to satisfy even the most gargantuan of appetites. Unfortunately, your €39 only covers a sole glass of freshly squeezed fruit juice (orange, lemon or grapefruit) and one hot drink €39 – barely enough to keep you going. Drink some water in between trips to the buffet, or out on to the balcony which looks out over the Grand Palais – you are, after all, in the middle of the Champs-Elysees roundabout. Space is limited and the tables are sought after, so don’t forget to book. TB 2 rond-point des Champs-Elysées, 8e - 01.53.75.78.78• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • UN DIMANCHE A PARIS Where? In the 6th arrondissement, next to Odéon. When? Sundays, two servings: 11.00am and 12.30pm. How much? €38. In brief: Delicious and refined. Chocoholics will be in paradise in this concept store dedicated to cocoa, where an upscale brunch is served on Sundays. Here only premium products are on offer: Poilane bread, Bordier butter and slices of Iberian loin. As part of the €55 menu, you also get a foie gras with pear and crème de cassis (in autumn) and a glass of Champagne instead of juice. There are no muffins, but rather a madeleine, a mini-éclair and a slice of cake – all of which go perfectly with one of the best hot chocolates in Paris, made ​​with real melted chocolate, milk, a little cream and a touch of cinnamon and vanilla. Naturally, this is not cheap (the basic menu will set you back €35), but the level of refinement justifies the price. And you can always dial up the decadence to the maximum while you’re there, with a cheeky visit to the chocolate shop next-door. 4-6-8 Cour du Commerce Saint André, 6e - 01.56.81.18.18

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Bookable brunches

KUBE HOTEL Where? In the 18th arrondissement, near La Chapelle. When? Sundays, 11.30am-4pm. How much? €34. In brief: Futuristic design, with an arty atmosphere. Of course, you could brunch at the Ritz for €120. But why would you when you can go to the Kube Hotel for a much more fun morning meal at €34 per head? Animated by a jazzy DJ and an artist providing commentary on his works, this is a decidedly arty affair. On the menu are two buffets consisting of delights both sweet and savoury: tuna tartare, foie gras, prawn skewers, crème brûlée or tiramisu with strawberries. You can decorate these with: muffins, waffles, rum babas and even sweets. To complete the meal you might choose eggs à la carte or a daily special – such as veal stew or chicken curry. The décor and jazzy ambiance invite you to linger in this unique venue. RJ 1-5 passage Ruelle, 18e - 01.42.05.20.00 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • CASA LOLA Where? In the 18th arrondissement, at Lamarck. When? Saturdays and Sundays, 11am-4pm. How much ? €19.50 (€23.50 with a glass of wine). In brief : Sweet and savoury, and generous, delicious portions. At Casa Lola, you’ve hardly even sat down before everything is on the table. It starts sweet, with jars of jam, butter, lemon curd, chocolate spread and caramel with salted butter – everything arriving quickly in a barrage of spreadable goodness. Before you know it hot drinks, orange or freshly squeezed grapefruit juice follow, then fresh bread and slice of cake (lemon or carrot). If that all sounds a little high in saccharine, you can also order from a savoury selection, each dish accompanied by the house coleslaw and onion rings. The bagels (with pastrami or salmon) are served with bacon and scrambled eggs; the fried egg on toast is accompanied by an assortment of Italian and Spanish charcuterie – or try the pastry with egg and beef tartare with fresh herbs. Whether riding the sugar rush or sated and salted, your experience here will leave you with a full stomach and the urge to come back. 12 rue Francœur, 18e - 01.42.55.42.41 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • LE 37M2 Cuisine: Asian. Where? In the 9th arrondissement, next to the Square d’Anvers. When? Sundays, 11am-4pm How much? €25. Two years ago Aurélien Jegou (an actor and director) and Costya Chen (a painter) embarked on a culinary adventure, supported by Yi Lin Leballeur a pastry chef of Taiwanese ancestry who had previously worked with Guy Savoy. Only two years since its opening, Le 37m2 is already demonstrating some impressive culinary expertise, boasts a loyal customer base and has enjoyed good reviews in the press. Despite the restaurant’s growing reputation and a rather modest space (alluded to in the name), you won’t have to endure a half-hour queue to enjoy an exceptional Franco-Taiwanese brunch here. The décor is smart and airy, and complements the food – starting with an unsalted bun served piping hot with homemade jams (blackberry, raspberry, mango), accompanied by a perfect oolong tea from Taiwan. (The restaurant styles itself as a tea room; other welcome surprises include green or black bubble-tea flavoured with black tapioca that forms spongy bubbles that you need a straw to try to catch.) The dishes themselves are creative and well balanced – like the beef sautéed with vegetables, basil and green pepper, or prawns on a bed of tofu and stuffed zucchini served with tasty rice, mixed salad seasoned with peanuts, a few slices of perfectly runny omelette and a fresh fruit salad. The desserts are equally accomplished and include a gourmet coffee that we can’t recommend highly enough (never mind the extra €2). And all without risking indigestion from this generous, but never stodgy, brunch. NH 66-68 rue Rodier, 9e - 01.48.78.03.20 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • CHEZ CASIMIR Where? In the 10th arrondissement, next to Gare du Nord. When? Saturdays and Sundays, 10am-7pm. How much? €26. In brief: Delicious and plentiful – a must. Thierry Breton, owner of Chez Michel and of this bistrot next door, takes the idea of generous servings to extremes. Here, this doesn’t mean an American brunch experience – instead Chez Casimir lays on ‘le Traou Mad’ (meaning ‘good things’ in Breton), served continually from 10am to 7pm. You can fill your plate with delicious fare from Brittany and elsewhere, starting in simple fashion, with salted butter on exceptional country bread, and moving on to just about everything else: charcuterie, seafood, boudin, smoked salmon, salads, omelettes… Then come the casseroles of flaked cod, the beef bourguignon or similarly hearty dishes. Still hungry? Head towards the ‘grandmother-style’ dessert buffet. The atmosphere is noisy but convivial and the price (€26) is incredible in light of the quality. Not hard, then, to understand the place’s success.
AW 6 rue de Belzunce, 10e – 01.48.78.28.80 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • L’ECHAPPEE Where? Rue de la Folie Méricourt, between Oberkampf and Parmentier. When? Saturdays and Sundays, noon-3pm. How much? €25. In brief: A light, stylish and comfortable space – and you can hit the spa while you’re at it. L’Echappée is primarily a lovely spa, whose stark modern façade hides stands out amid the dishevelled grandeur of the rue de la Folie Méricourt. But regulars know you can also come here for brunch on weekends from noon to 3pm in the bright upstairs rooms. Make sure you arrive early to grab the armchairs at one of the big coffee tables – they’re criminally comfy. Once you’re settled in, for €25 per person you can have a buffet of your choice consisting of orange juice, coffee or tea and a variety of small dishes which change regularly, including strained muesli, fruit salad, chocolate cake, cheesecake, carrot cake… All followed by a plate of ‘friendly vegetables’, scrambled eggs and potatoes, vegetarian lasagne or leek pie. The food is delicious and the variety is second to none. Also make sure that you leave room one of their famous desserts: go for pancakes or French toast. After a morning at the spa, a L’Echappée brunch is probably the best way to continue the day on a high. EC 64 rue de la Folie Méricourt, 11e - 01.58.30.12.50 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • LES ENFANTS PERDUS Where? In the 10th arrondissement, next to Canal Saint-Martin. When? Sundays, 12-4pm. How much? €25. In brief: Generous portions, varied dishes, quality produce. Les Enfants Perdus is a discreet and really rather chic fine-dining restaurant frequented by the bobos of the Canal Saint-Martin, and overspill from the bars L’Atmosphère and Café Bonnie. The interior is sombre but at the back, a light and airy room has been kitted out with comfortable benches strewn with white cushions – ideal for plonking yourself down on a Saturday or Sunday morning at brunch hour. And the dishes are exceptional. The best approach here is to fast for a day beforehand, in order to take full advantage of the gigantic, delicious brunch prepared by a Michelin-starred chef who is passionate about both style and substance – even when it comes to brunch. The menu is unique, and changes every six months. For €25 no fewer than three platters are brought to you. The first comprises delicious mini-viennoiseries, house orange juice and hot drinks of your choosing; the second features shirred eggs, cake, a beautiful slice of organic salmon on a bed of salad and a cup of cucumbers in white cheese with mint. After loosening your belt you will receive a final, enormous platter with vegetable soup, faisselle au miel, grapes, ham and cheese. Oof (in the best sense possible). CG 9 Rue des Récollets,  10e - 01.81.29.48.26 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • NOLITA Where? In the 8th arrondissement, on the Champs-Elysées roundabout. When? Sundays, 11am-4pm. How much? €39. In brief: Italian-style brunch, delicious buffet, generous portions – but expensive. Diehard devotees of scrambled eggs and bacon will search in vain for British comfort food here. Nolita’s unrivalled ‘brunch à l’italienne’ is a lavish, Latin buffet that’s a world away from a London fry-up: melting mozzarella, carpaccio of swordfish, Parmesan shavings on a bed of bresaola, soft sliced ​​octopus, subtly marinated vegetables, sundried tomatoes… The freshness and refinement will delight anyone who’s keeping an eye on their calorie intake. But those with a hankering for something heavier need not worry: Nolita also offers breaded saffron rice dumplings, stuffed focaccia and the choice of two hot dishes (moist lasagne or steaming cannelloni). To complete the Italian experience, there is a healthy spread of desserts: tiramisu, panna cotta, walnut pie, fresh fruit and cornetti (croissants filled with cream or jam). So, enough here to satisfy even the most gargantuan of appetites. Unfortunately, your €39 only covers a sole glass of freshly squeezed fruit juice (orange, lemon or grapefruit) and one hot drink €39 – barely enough to keep you going. Drink some water in between trips to the buffet, or out on to the balcony which looks out over the Grand Palais – you are, after all, in the middle of the Champs-Elysees roundabout. Space is limited and the tables are sought after, so don’t forget to book. TB 2 rond-point des Champs-Elysées, 8e - 01.53.75.78.78

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Sandra D
Sandra D

Would like to suggest you Villa Spicy restaurant.
Excellent food, high quality, charming staff, nice atmospher.
Very good value regarding the location just off Champs Elysees.
Recommended.
Next time Wew will visit again