Arts & Entertainment

Your complete guide to Singapore's art exhibitions, theatre plays, musicals, comedy, movie reviews and film trailers

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Interview: Isaac Hempstead-Wright, aka Bran Stark on 'Game of Thrones'

If Isaac Hempstead-Wright got his way, Seth Rogen would make a cameo in an upcoming season of 'Game of Thrones'

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Latest film reviews and releases

Film

Best films to watch in April

We pick out the best of this month’s silver screen offerings for all you avid movie-goers

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Film

The Jungle Book

Who wanted a Disney remake of ‘The Jungle Book’? No one. Especially not one combining CGI with a real-life boy. But forget about your worries – this new version is the jungle VIP. Director Jon Favreau hasn’t monkeyed around, dipping into the 1967 cartoon for gags and fun and Rudyard Kipling’s 1894 novel for darkness, adding awe-and-wonder effects (I gasped as elephants appeared out of the mist in all their trumpeting majesty). Still, it should come with a warning: this is not safe ’n’ cuddly, hug-a-tiger Disney (Twitter is already calling it ‘“The Revenant” for kids’). Twelve-year-old Neel Sethi (picked from over 2,000 child actors) stars as Mowgli, the boy raised by wolves. Credit to the filmmakers for adding female characters to the all-male line up, with Lupita Nyong’o playing Raksha, the mother wolf who loves Mowgli as fiercely as her own and protects him when tiger Shere Khan stalks back into the jungle with designs on turning him into a man-cub morsel. It’s wise panther Bagheera (voiced to perfection by Ben Kingsley) who decides Mowgli must return to his own kind. As a villain, Shere Khan is up there with Scar from ‘The Lion King’ and quite possibly baddie of the year. Voiced by Idris Elba (with his east London accent, like Luther gone bad), this predator is all the more dangerous because he’s at the end of his murderous shelf-life: battle scarred, gnarled, a little mangy, and capable of anything. Halfway through, you’re thinking: the only thing missing here is the song

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

The Huntsman: Winter's War

Mirror mirror on the wall, what’s the fairest sequel of them all? Not this follow-up to ‘Snow White and the Huntsman’, which starred Kristen Stewart as Snow White and Charlize Theron as her hot evil stepmother. ‘Winter’s War’ is hammily entertaining, but at points feels like a Russian oligarch has thrown a ‘Game of Thrones’ party and bunged his favourite Hollywood actors a few million quid each to come in fancy dress. Kristen Stewart is gone. So this time the story – it gets pretty messy – begins as a prequel, with the queen’s heartbroken sister (Emily Blunt) fleeing to a frozen wasteland. Curdled by grief, she transforms into the Ice Queen, kidnapping children to grow an army of heartless killers. The one rule in her kingdom is that nobody can fall in love. But two of her fighters (Jessica Chastain and Chris Hemsworth, back as the Huntsman) can’t help it. Blunt outclasses everyone, cold as steel and creepily unhinged. Chastain does a decent Katniss. But chirpy-chappy Chris Hemsworth looks like he’s in a different movie. And, like the original, we get the ritual humiliation of British actors digitally shrunken to dwarf-size (Nick Frost, Rob Brydon). All told, ‘Winter’s War’ is not the fairest sequel, but it’s not so terrible that it deserves to be taken out to the forest and finished off.

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Film

Hardcore Henry

This revolution in action cinema works despite its utter silliness (or because of it). Directed by Russia-born filmmaker Ilya Naishuller, 'Hardcore Henry' is filmed entirely from the hero’s perspective, a coup that achieves a near-experimental bliss – you won’t know how it was executed, nor will you care. The idea comes from video games and ‘Hardcore’ turns this gimmick into a feature-length concept, not without precedent. Yet because it’s a gory nonstop fight movie (unlike, say, 1947’s first-person detective noir ‘Lady in the Lake’), the cameraman has to be as agile and fearless as a stuntperson, flinging himself into hand-to-hand combat, out the doors of exploding vehicles, over fences and down stairwells. The plot fits on a postage stamp: you are Henry, a mute cyborg suffering from a complete memory wipe. Nursing you back to health is the scientist wife you can’t remember (Haley Bennett). As you fight your brutal way through dozens –hundreds? – of unlucky henchmen toward an evil boss (Danila Kozlovsky), you encounter Jimmy (‘District 9’ actor Sharlto Copley, the movie’s default star), a chatty shape-shifter and helpful presence who sometimes appears as a British gangster, an exuberant brothel regular or a pot-smoking hippie. ‘Hardcore’ isn’t deep. It’s not about complex ideas and it’s not going to win any awards for female characters. Even the CGI effects are a little shoddy. But by stepping into the shoes of a wall-climbing Jackie Chan, a parkour-sprinting Daniel Craig or

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Film

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

Zack Snyder’s lumbering superhero mélange 'Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice' feels like a $250-million tombstone for a genre in dire need of a break. It’s supposed to be the glorious ramp-up to a new crime-fighting franchise, DC Comics’s Justice League, but you’ll wish this strenuously empty movie had boned up on a few lessons beforehand. There’s zero humour or self-deprecation, as there was in Joss Whedon’s pitch-perfect 'The Avengers'; no performance of unlikely depth, like the one Heath Ledger pulled off in 'The Dark Knight'; and no animating spirit of decency, a trait Christopher Reeve’s Superman had in spades. Instead, we have Henry Cavill’s persistently inert Clark Kent and, somehow worse, Ben Affleck’s one-dimensionally vexed Bruce Wayne squaring off in a Metropolis still reeling from the devastation seen in 2013’s 'Man of Steel'. Neither actor is capable of setting the screen on fire – their first verbal showdown is hardly Pacino versus De Niro in 'Heat' – but the imbalance feels especially acute in a city that’s supposed to be publicly debating the philosophical merits of omnipotence. Add to the mix Jesse Eisenberg’s instantly annoying, tic-laden Lex Luthor, a millennial billionaire who speaks in chattering screenwriter-ese ('The red capes are coming!'), and Amy Adams’s Lois Lane, never more lost in a film that has no use for her softness, and you have a distinctly plastic affair. The plot turns on the shocking, never-mentioned-again destruction of a symbolic Ame

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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Film

Kung Fu Panda 3

Po the panda (voiced by Jack Black) returns as a lovable, paunchy bundle of fur tasked with saving his homeland from disaster in the latest 'Kung Fu Panda' instalment. It’s the first to be co-produced by Oriental Dreamworks—a savvy move, given that China will soon be the world’s top-grossing market. In the final scene of 'Kung Fu Panda 2', we saw that Po’s biological father, Lee, supposedly killed by a genocidal peacock, was alive and well. The new movie follows Lee (Bryan Cranston), who discovers Po at the noodle shop of his goosey adoptive dad, Mr Ping (James Hong). Po is persuaded to visit Lee’s village, but his idyllic time with other giant pandas is shattered by news that the villainous Kai (JK Simmons) has escaped the spirit realm to steal the chi—that's the life force, kids—of China’s inhabitants. Only Po, aided by Master Shifu (Dustin Hoffman) and his friends, can stop him. It won't be easy, and life lessons are lurking, such as, sometimes, it takes a village. While the scriptwriters happily riff on franchise gags like the excruciating Wuxi finger-hold and excessive dumpling-gorging contests, the new sequel lacks the tear-jerking revelations and darker edge that characterized its predecessor. Visually though, 'Kung Fu Panda 3' is a candy-coloured 3D treat, from the exquisite sunset that shimmers over the panda enclave to the psychedelia of the spirit world. The addition of a love interest for Po, a ribbon-swirling panda called Mei-Mei (Kate Hudson), is a firecracker

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Top art museums and galleries in Singapore

Art

National Gallery Singapore

The former City Hall and Supreme Court buildings have been refurbished to become the National Gallery

Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Film

Objectifs Centre for Photography & Filmmaking

Regular courses and workshops at this filmmaking and photography hub

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Art

ArtScience Museum

Art and science coexist in the same space at Marina Bay Sands

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Things to do

Gillman Barracks

A cluster of galleries take over this former military encampment

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Things to do

MINT Museum of Toys

A private museum with the largest collection of vintage toys in Southeast Asia

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Art

Singapore Art Museum

20th-century Asian visual art housed in a colonial building

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