Bangkok's best new bar openings this month

Speakeasy, beer bars, gin bars, cocktail bars–you name it
By Time Out Bangkok staff writer |
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Wet, wine bar
Sereechai Puttes/Time Out Bangkok
Bars, Wine bars

Wet

icon-location-pin Langsuan

Gastronomic Heavyweight Gaggan has always been associated with the fine-dining aspect, which is why many expected his recentlyopened wine bar, Wet, to resemble the elegant lounges at five-star hotels. On the contrary, Wet is fun and laidback, showcasing Gaggan’s take on the currently trendy natural wine bar concept. Taking up space right next to the white mansion occupied by Gaggan, Wet goes against the grain of your typical wine bar. The entrance takes guests by surprise, marked by bathroom cubicle doors that open up to reveal a squat toilet and urinal—sights you typically encounter at dodgy gas station. (Gunn Leelhasuwan, who’s also responsible for the cheeky look of Teens of Thailand and Asia Today, let his imagination run wild yet again at Wet.) One of the cubicle doors, however, gains you access to the two-story bar, where a combination of wooden roof truss, bare concrete walls, and colorful cushions—all bathed in an eerie red LED glow—set the mood for secret rendezvous or intimate get-togethers. Gaggan’s sommelier, Vladimir Kojic, oversees the space, and is more than happy to explain his passion for natural wine to customers, be they wine newbies or connoisseurs. Most of the selections were chosen by Vladimir himself from small vineyards, usually in the Central and Eastern European regions, that make wine with native yeast and without additional chemicals. “Natural wine is very fragile and cannot stay open for a long time,” says Vladimir to explain why by-the-glass op

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Sul Bangkok, Gastrobar
Sereechai Puttes/Time Out Bangkok
Bars

Sul

icon-location-pin Thonglor

Thonglor's latest gastrobar plays with traditional Korean elements and reconstructs them with innovative twists. Sul is run by a group of young entrepreneurs who took bits of their memories of Koreatowns around the globe as inspiration. Traditional Korean spirits and elements take centerstage, but are given tweaks by highprofile Italian mixologist, Fabio Brugnolano. With Kimbub Cocktail (B390), he presents the signature flavors of savory Korean fare in liquid form, using a mix of fresh cucumber, radish, and salty seaweed. Yakgwa Sour (B420), meanwhile, is a pleasant surprise to the palate. This unusual tipple uses yakgwa, a Korean wheat malt cookie, as the core element, soaking it in rum and then combining it with ginger extract, honey syrup and bourbon, and topped with bitter sesames vodka foam. For lighter sips, we recommend Sansachun Sangria (B350), a drink that mixes fresh fruits, well-aged rice wine and elderflower. Sul takes their food as serious as their drinks. A cutting-edge east-meet-west menu uses innovative European cooking techniques, resulting in sophisticated textures and new dimensions in flavor. Essence of the Sea (B280), is a dish that cooks pasta, seaweed and fish roe in aromatic truffle oil. Served cold, it’s presented in a clear fishbowl on top of dried ice. Another dish that deserves mention is the Pulled Pork Tteok (B280), which defines “classic with a twist” by topping wood chip-smoked pulled pork and tokpokki (stir-fried rice cake) with siphon-proce

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Bars, Hotel bars

Spectrum Lounge & Bar

icon-location-pin Nana

Spectrum is a three-level watering hole that crowns the newly-opened Hyatt Regency Sukhumvit Hotel on Soi Sukhumvit 13. Comprising an air-conditioned lounge and a more exciting outdoor, it’s ideal for taking in views of Lower Sukhumvit.

008 Bangkok
Sereechai Puttes/Time Out Bangkok
Bars, Cocktail bars

008

icon-location-pin Thonglor

It's unfortunate that the concept of the Prohibition—a temperance movement spanning the 1920s that banned alcohol consumption in the US, but ironically when the cocktail culture blossomed in the country—has been reduced into a marketing gimmick for many a retro-inspired cocktail bar. 008, a new secret bar in Thonglor hasrescued the concept by offering a drink menu that pays proper respect to the spirits of the era. Pailin “Milk” Sajjanit, the former head mixologist at Vesper and Zuma, and 2016 Diageo Southeast Asia World Class champion, is in charge. She makes sure the drinks are well-rounded and appropriately play along with the Prohibition theme. Inspired by the zeitgeist of the era, Pailin has come up with spirits-forward numbers with empowering names such as Great Power (B460). Based on a classic Manhattan recipe, this drink mixes Rittenhouse rye with oregano-infused Ysabel Regina brandy and aromatic bitters. Another signature drink, the 1920s (B360), is a more well-rounded version of Negroni, combining Whitley Dry Gin, Campari and clarified orange-infused vermouth. Forgotten Prohibition classics are also reinterpreted by Pailin. A drink called Pyroblast (B420) is inspired by a recipe from the cocktail tome, Lost Recipes of Prohibition by Matthew Rowley, and has been resurrected as a refreshing rum-based cocktail with coconut syrup and a “Pyroblast syrup” made of spices. Apart from playing up the Prohibition theme, one of the agendas of 008 is to focus on classic cocktails and deliver them as they are supposed to be.

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Dr. Fetch
Sereechai Puttes/Time Out Bangkok
Bars, Cocktail bars

Dr. Fetch

icon-location-pin Sukhumvit 24

Octo Seafood Bar has made its name to Sukhumvit’s dining scene as a one-stop seafood destination with eye-striking giant octopus clinging majestically at the very store front. Helping to fulfill the ocean theme of the shipshaped restaurant is a cocktail bar serving cocktails with references to the underwater world. Perching on the second floor of the seafoodcentric complex, Dr. Fetch is embedded with narratives alluding to a laboratory hidden underwater operating by a fictional scientist. That explains the reasons why all the bartenders are dressed up in white laboratory gown. In contrast to the bright restaurant setting, the inside of Dr. Fetch is dimly-lit and succumbed to the heavy beats from live band performing nightly. If you look for a more private corner, take a seat in a connect room quirkily surrounded by wooden rabbits and animal skeletons. To comply with the bustling seafood restaurant downstairs, Dr. Fetch cocktails are conjured up with strong influence from the sea — dominantly via the name of the cocktails, garnishes and the shape of the glasses, not in the drink as we had expected. There’s the Pirate Spice Rum (B400), the concoction photogenically served in a siphon machine with the combination of pea flower-infused rum, toasted coconut and Maraschino liqueur brewed with lemongrass, ginger and butter, before being served hot in a Chinese-style tea cup. (The item is big enough to feed 3-4 people). 

Liberation cocktail bar
Eattaku/Time Out Bangkok
Bars, Cocktail bars

Liberation

icon-location-pin Watthana

Everyone knows that a cocktail is the result of compounded flavors built from different ingredients mixed into a glass. Noted Bangkok mixologists Suwincha “Chacha” Singsuwan, Kitibordee “Gov” Chortubtim and Krit “Joey” Prakobdee, however, are challenging this notion. Armed with the mission of finding and enhancing the flavor spectrum of ingredients, the bartenders have teamed up to deliver the most progressive cocktail experience Bangkok has to offer—with some help from science. Their collaborative effort is called Libération. Tucked one floor above Paint Bar in Piman 49 complex, the dimly lit space is dominated by a massive marble-topped bar surrounded by cushioned seats. Everything is in black, including the leather coasters, the bartenders’ uniforms and the elongated lights hanging down from the ceiling. Libération’s agenda is to “liberate” cocktail culture from traditional mixology, especially where flavor is concerned—and they’re hoping to achieve this via scientific means. The speakeasy is the first in the country to utilize a rotary evaporator (also known as rotovap), a chem lab machine that distills liquids in a very low temperature in a vacuum environment. The lower temperature allows the essence and aroma of the distilled substance to be extracted minus the heating process, thereby delivering a concentrated and clarified liquid packed with flavor. “One flavor is composed of the layering of different flavors,” Kitibordee explains. “When we eat a tomato, for exampl

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