Kendall Square Cinema

Movies Roxbury
5 out of 5 stars
Kendall Square Cinema
© Michael Ascanio Peguero

This MIT-area staple is a good place to see first-run independent films, but purists wouldn’t call it an independent flickhouse; the indies run alongside big blockbusters and the whole place is owned by Landmark Theatres, who wrangle 54 cinemas nationwide. 









Posted:

Venue name: Kendall Square Cinema
Contact:
Address: 1 Kendall Square
Boston

Cross street: at Cardinal Medeiros Avenue
Transport: Red line to Kendall/MIT
Price: Tickets $11; $9 reductions.
Static map showing venue location
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