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Chicago International Film Festival reviews

Keep up to date with the hits and misses from this year’s 50th anniversary Chicago International Film Festival

It's the Chicago International Film Festival's 50th anniversary and the fest is celebrating with an eclectic line-up that includes a host of intriguging films from around the world, including some classic titles from their half-century span. Over the next few weeks, we'll be posting reviews from major films like Benedict Cumberbatch's The Imitation Game and Reese Witherspoon's Wild. But we'll also be bringing reviews of some of the fest's smaller, can't-miss movies so that you can plan your perfect festival experience.

RECOMMENDED: Chicago International Film Festival guide

The latest Chicago International Film Festival reviews

The Babadook

5 out of 5 stars

Actress-turned-debuting-feature-director Jennifer Kent has the narrative chutzpah to show her entire hand in the pop-up story and then make us squirm as foretold events come true

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Birdman

5 out of 5 stars

Birdman is a savagely funny, strangely sweet, sad and utterly brilliant comedy

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Human Capital

2 out of 5 stars

Just when you thought Italian arthouse cinema was on a roll, it comes under the malign influence of Paul Haggis’s Crash

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The Imitation Game

4 out of 5 stars

Hidden codes, secret meanings and mixed messages pulse through the reliable, old-fashioned, buzzing copper wires of this true-life British period drama

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The Look of Silence

5 out of 5 stars

The Look of Silence is Joshua Oppenheimer's staggering follow-up to the Oscar-nominated documentary The Act of Killing

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Miss Julie

3 out of 5 stars

Not all servant and master relationships can match the jovial familiarity shared by the residents of Downton Abbey. August Strindberg’s 1988 play, adapted by for the screen by Liv Ullman, paints a far more vicious and resentful portrait of life in a palatial country home.

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National Gallery

5 out of 5 stars

For his latest institutional exploration, the great documentarian Frederick Wiseman turns his inquisitive lens on the employees, patrons and paintings in London’s National Gallery

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