Lollapalooza 2011, Sunday: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza 2011: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza 2011: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

  • Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

    Lollapalooza: Day 3: Cold War Kids

Photograph: Mandy Dempsey

Lollapalooza 2011: Day 3: Cold War Kids

 


Taking their fourth turn at what, at this point, could only be described as a mud-soaked sludge fest, the smartly dressed So Cal quartet was quick to thank fans for sticking around. “We’re the Foo Fighters and we’re so glad you’re here,“ singer Nathan Willett joked to the mass that seemed more than happy to have a chuckle after weathering not one, but two torrential downpours that evening. 


Their hit “Hang Me Up to Dry” couldn’t have been more apropos, the opening lyrics “Careless in our summer clothes/Splashing around in the muck and the mire”, providing a spot-on description of the scene. It’s almost as if, years ago, they penned the tune specifically for this music-fest hypothetical that all too often manifests itself. Whether tactical or completely coincidental, it added a dose of lyrical fun to the massive swamp stomp going on.


One could argue there’s nothing particularly special about what these guys are doing, though there’s nothing truly bad to say about them either. They’ve been around the festival block. They’re always positive. Their radio-ready, Maroon 5-style of retro-influenced rock is super palatable, and executed, for the most part, very decently (I noticed a few time-signature flubs during “Tell me in the morning”). They’re like that much-loved white guy band in college that plays the sports bar once a month. If a newly sober Eminem is the headliner to end all Lollapalooza headliners, then these guys are the house band. The problem with the house band? It’s rarely remembered the next day. But that’s ok—they’ll most likely be back again next year.


 



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