Kinky virginity porn saga comes to an end

First I wrote a post about Kink.com's upcoming live streaming of virginal sex. Then there was some craziness around the blogosphere, including an excellent post from porn star Miss Maggie Mayhem that I thought raised some interesting questions. Miss Mayhem has written another excellent, followup post in which she reprints an apology from Peter Acworth, the CEO of Kink, Inc. Here's the apology: Dear Maggie, I appreciate your thoughtful response to what I admit was a misguided marketing effort on our part. You are entirely right that the way we framed our fulfillment of Nickis fantasy was not in line with our values as a company and our commitment to demystify and celebrate alternative sexualities, and I apologize to anyone who was offended by our mishandling of the topic. Weve taken your feedback to heart revisited our entire marketing effort around this event. When Nicki approached us several months ago with her fantasy of losing her virginity on camera in front of a live online audience, we were very honored and gave a lot of thought to whether this kind of event really fit within our mission. As you know, Nicki is not new to sex she has explored her sexually via anal and oral play many times in the past and after many discussions with her in which she explained what virginity meant to her personally and how central her hymen is to that fantasy, we felt that we could help her live out this desire in a way that would be exciting and pleasurable for everyone involved: Nicki, her co-stars and our members. I regret how the press release was worded. It did not convey our gratitude that Nicki feels that Kink is the place where she can best live out a fantasy shes had for many years to break her hymen during her first vaginal sex experience in front of thousands of fans and I thank you for pointing that out. Like you, I truly hope this will be a rewarding experience for Nicki. In fact, I think she would benefit tremendously from having supportive individuals like you in the audience. If you are amenable, I would like to personally invite you to attend the event on Saturday to participate what I hope will be an unforgettable experience for everyone involved. Best wishes, Peter Acworth CEO, Kink.com I thought the whole brouhaha was extremely interesting, and it's impressive that Mr. Acworth wrote such a nice apology and redid all the marketing around the event. (Though I do agree with Maymay that it's unclear how sincere and useful the apology is. I mean, the event has already received so much publicity, and so many people have reposted the press release, that it's not like Kink, Inc is losing much by changing the marketing at this late juncture.) At the very least, Kink.com is doing its best to appear responsive to the concerns of the sex-positive and sex education community. I still don't think the most important questions about this were answered, though. In my opinion, here they are: * What kind of art/porn do we expect a sex-positive porn company to produce? In constructive terms, what guidelines could we offer? * How much latitude do we allow them to work within the fetishes of their users, which may occasionally sound politically incorrect -- like "virginity" as defined by the presence of a hymen? Maymay wrote a comment on my first post in which he implied that I'm failing to be adequately ethical or sex-positive by being reluctant to criticize Kink's original marketing efforts. He wrote: You are failing, still, to see the distinction between marketing fantasy and the importance of distinguishing fantasy from marketing. A press release is an appropriate place to market in the sense of to publicize. It is not, however, an appropriate place to forego making the distinction between the product and its marketing. Well, okay. I'm still not sure I agree, but I think I at least understand the argument. But in that case, where is it appropriate to for a porn company to articulate a fantasy? As Miss Mayhem pointed out in her post, Kink has redone all the marketing efforts -- not just the press release, but also the banner ads and everything else. That seems kind of weird to me. Most people don't think about their fantasies in abstract theoretical terms; how many people who think virginity is hot are going to see a banner that says "Nicki Blue's first pussy penetration!" and equate that with the "Nicki Blue loses her virginity!" pitch that made this event so appealing in the first place? At some point, Kink has to be allowed to describe the actual fantasy in fantasy language, in order to attract people who think the fantasy is hot. If they can't do that in their press releases or in their banner ads, then where can they do it? Relevant posts on my personal blog: * A Lone Villain Working Within an Evil Empire, and its sequel The Lone Villain Rides Again * Sympathy for the Anti-Porn Feminists



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