What The Word Be: Why Black English Is The King's English

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What The Word Be: Why Black English Is The King's English
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Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History says
Hear author Diane Procter Reeder's fresh interpretation of the Bible as she explores the connection between black English and biblical text. Reeder's 2014 book, What the Word Be: Why Black English is the King's (James) English!, provides a biting social commentary on the significance of Black English in America as an alternative language, which she contends should be recognized because of its dual heritage: not only from the shores of Africa, but from the "White Cliffs of Dover" in England. In fact, Reeder contends that Black English has cousins in the hills of West Virginia as well as Canada's Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. All of these forms of English were central in the book which bears the name of the 17th century monarch, King James: The Bible, the ONLY book that most slaves were allowed to read. Her point? Black culture is Black wealth, African Americans ignore that to their peril...and all Americans should respect the roots of this rich and powerful language. She challenges linguists, educators and all of us to affirm the significance of this truly American linguistic form. What the Word BE...was named one of the Ten Best Black Books of 2014 by national book critic and NAACP Image Award Nominating Committee member Kam Williams.

Free and open to the public. For more information please call (313) 494-5800.

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
315 East Warren Avenue
Detroit, Michigan 48201
The Wright Museumâ„¢
www.TheWright.org
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By: Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

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