Worldwide icon-chevron-right Asia icon-chevron-right Hong Kong icon-chevron-right 11 best mooncakes to try this Mid-Autumn Festival

11 best mooncakes to try this Mid-Autumn Festival

Shoot for the moon

2019 Duddell's Mooncakes
By Time Out Hong Kong |
Advertising

Even though our stomachs haven’t quite fully recovered from feasting during June’s Dragon Boat Festival, Mid-Autumn Festival and its promises of endless mooncakes are upon us once again. Every year, the creative flavours and phenomenal packaging lure us in, and this year is no exception. Whether you’re craving the traditional white lotus seed paste and egg yolk version from Cuisine Cuisine or are looking for something more adventurous from the likes of John Anthony and The Cakery, there will surely be something that will perk up your tastebuds in our selection of the 11 best mooncake gift boxes this Mid-Autumn Festival. By Mabel Lui


RECOMMENDED: For some of Hong Kong’s best foods, have a look at the best restaurants you have to try and the best cheap eats in Hong Kong.

11 best mooncakes to try this Mid-Autumn Festival

Restaurants, Chinese

Cuisine Cuisine

icon-location-pin Central

Cuisine Cuisine has always been known for its spectacular Chinese food, so we know that the mooncakes definitely won’t disappoint. This year, the restaurant has launched five different mooncake boxes, but the ‘Moonlight Bliss’ and tea set gift box stands out among the rest. This tea-riffic gift box is limited to only 500 sets, and aside from featuring classics like white lotus seed mooncakes and egg custard mooncakes (two of each), it also includes tangerine pu’er tea, glass tea pitchers, glass tea cups and full moon coasters for an extravagant afternoon tea or after-dinner treat. ($1,088)

Restaurants, Chinese

Duddell’s

icon-location-pin Central

Renowned in Hong Kong for its fusion of fine art and fine dining, the Michelin-starred Duddell’s continues to impress with its mooncake offering. A one-of-a-kind collaboration with Canadian artist Marcel Dzama, the holographic signature mooncake gift box houses six handmade cream custard mooncakes as well as Dzama’s ‘Blue Moon’, an intricate piece that displays a whimsical cast of characters celebrating the moon. Meanwhile, the flying bats in the background of ‘Blue Moon’ symbolise luck and prosperity, two things that will hopefully bring you enough good fortune before Chinese New Year rolls around again. ($398; order here)

Advertising
Hotels

InterContinental Grand Stanford Hong Kong

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui East

At InterContinental Grand Stanford’s Hoi King Heen, the signature homemade almond cream with egg white has always been popular and well-loved. This year, the hotel is paying tribute to this renowned dessert with a set of mooncakes. With a delicate and buttery outer crust that features a hint of egg white plus a fragrant and creamy almond paste, the signature almond cream mooncakes will surely surprise you with a delightfully sweet take on the traditional Mid-Autumn treat. There’ll only be 700 of these luxurious six-piece mooncake gift boxes, so be sure to get your hands on them sooner rather than later. ($388)

Restaurants, Chinese

John Anthony x The Cakery

icon-location-pin Causeway Bay

Mooncakes aren’t known to be healthy, necessarily, but John Anthony and The Cakery have set out to prove otherwise. Placing an emphasis on sustainable and nourishing ingredients, the Chinese restaurant and the healthy bakery have collaborated to bring us four artisanal mooncakes – one from John Anthony and three from The Cakery – that are all vegan and gluten-free. Think unconventional and superfood-packed flavours such as ginger and tumeric, dark chocolate and Sichuan chilli pepper, black and white sesame as well as rose, mixed berries and mango. Perfect if you’re looking to indulge without feeling an ounce of regret. ($398)

Advertising
KFC_mooncake_campaign_template

KFC

KFC’s chicken wing bucket has a new best friend. Called the Moonlight Bucket, the handy-dandy signature offering is cleverly named because it also moonlights as a lantern. The bucket presents two flavours: the spicy chicken and nuts mooncake with spicy chicken floss, almonds, sunflower seeds and peaches – definitely an uncommon addition – and the golden lava mooncake, which boasts a smooth egg yolk custard encased in a picture-perfect golden crust. Go for both sweet and savoury with three of each flavour in your bucket, or go all-in with the sweetness with a six-piece golden lava mooncake bucket. ($275)

old bailey mooncakes
Old Bailey
Restaurants, Chinese

Old Bailey

icon-location-pin Central

Old Bailey provides the change of pace you might be needing after having too many Cantonese-style mooncakes this year. The restaurant’s handmade Shanghai-style mooncakes have a crisp, buttery short-crust pastry, a far cry from their glossy, thick and chewy Cantonese counterparts. They’re available in both sweet and savoury versions. The latter of the two – a mixture of ground pork, shallot, ginger, soy sauce, dark soy sauce and white pepper powder – are a real treat. ($238 for a box of six; order here)

Advertising
Restaurants

Shanghai Tang x China Tang

icon-location-pin Central

This year marks luxury clothing brand Shanghai Tang’s 25th anniversary, and they're celebrating it with a bang by collaborating with restaurant China Tang to launch two limited edition mooncake sets. The silver edition includes six classic white lotus seed mooncakes with egg yolk, while the blue luxury set houses six mini egg custard mooncakes. Both feature exquisite packaging, and pop-up paper artwork of a heavenly Chinese palace in the midst of glowing evening lights only adds to the gift boxes’ allure. Don’t want to waste the packaging after the festival’s over? The multifunctional box can be repurposed into an ornate decoration as well as a precious place for your jewellery and miscellaneous items. ($628 for the Shanghai Tang x China Tang Silver Limited Edition Mooncake Set; $580 for the Shanghai Tang Midnight Blue Luxury Mooncake Set)

Time Out says
Hotels

Sheraton Hong Kong Hotel & Towers

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

This year, the Sheraton Hong Kong Hotel has launched three sets of mooncakes: the white lotus seed mooncake with double egg yolks (four pieces), mini custard cream mooncakes with egg yolks (eight pieces) and mini red bean paste mooncakes with dried citrus peel (eight pieces). While the first two are universally beloved, the latter takes notes from East Asian confections to deliver a fun mishmash of flavours. Made using the finest ingredients, all three feature super smooth fillings that are perfectly sweet and never overpowering. ($368 for the eight-piece mini custard cream mooncakes with egg yolks, $368 for the eight-piece red bean paste mooncakes with dried citrus peel and $412 for the four-piece white lotus seed mooncake with double egg yolks)

Advertising
Shopping

Sugarfina

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

American candy store Sugarfina’s gummy bears are so cute and delicate that we almost don’t want to eat them – the key word being almost. Sugarfina’s first-ever mooncake offering is as adorable as their signature sweets, with blue and white packaging that is adorned with handmade paper flowers to light up your world with its glittering LED lights. The gift box features two luscious custard mooncakes alongside two boxes of Sugarfina treats, including a box of popping candy-filled chocolate crunchy treats, named ‘Sparkle Pops’, and a box of Mama & Baby Champagne Bears. Certainly a gift that’s as sweet as can be. ($458)

Restaurants

Tai Hing

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui East

Tai Hing is a popular to-go for quality barbeque and roast meats, so it only makes sense that their mooncakes are filled with the same smoky and crispy goodness. Encased within a traditional pastry crust, the supreme roast goose and BBQ pork mooncakes have an exterior that disguises its nontraditional but fragrant filling. High quality nuts (hazelnuts, walnuts and cashews) are also included in the recipe, adding some welcome texture and crunch. ($218)

Show more

Sugar, sugar

Advertising
Advertising