A Look Back At Segregation: Reception

Things to do
0 Love It
Save it
A Look Back At Segregation: Reception
More Less
Houston Museum of African American Culture says
Prior to the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, segregation laws in Texas mandated separate schools for African Americans and in some areas for Mexican Americans. In keeping with this policy, the University Interscholastic League limited membership to “white” public schools. Still, black teams were common through Texas, and in 1920 the Texas Interscholastic League of Colored Schools formed, evolving into the Prairie View Interscholastic League (PVIL) under the authority of Prairie View A&M University. Like the UIL for white schools, PVIL was the governing body for athletics, typing, public speaking, music, and extemporaneous speaking contests. Since laws separating races in schools were done away with, the PVIL has been forgotten by the general public. But accomplishments by “colored” school athletes remain undisputed, despite having to play with hand-me-down equipment and uniform on Thursday and Saturdays because fields were reserved for the white schools on Fridays. If not for the PVIL, athletes such as Mean Joe Green (Temple Dunbar), Ernie Banks (Dallas Booker T. Washington), Clifford Branch (Houston Worthing), Edward Mitchell (Galveston Central), Eldridge Dickey (Houston Booker T. Washington)and Abner Haynes (Dallas Lincoln) would not have achieved national recognition.
More Less

By: Houston Museum of African American Culture

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/185644728465730
To improve this listing email: feedback@timeout.com