Hotels

The best boutique hotels in Lisbon

Looking for an excellent excuse to escape your rut? Book a night in one of the best boutique hotels in Lisbon


By Time Out Lisbon editors

Posted: Sunday July 1 2018


Fotografia: Matilde Cunha Vaz
As Janelas Verdes
Considered the rich cousin of the not-so-fancy B&B, boutique hotels are known for their personality and cosy environment. The laidback mood is designed to make guests feel at home, and the best ones in the capital certainly know how to do it in style. So pack your things, head into the city and stay at one of our choices of the best boutique hotels in Lisbon.
 
Recommended: The best Lisbon attractions.
D.R.
Hotels, Boutique hotels

Memmo Príncipe Real - Design Hotels

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real

Situated in one of the finest spots in Lisbon, Memmo's third hotel offers an unbeatable view of the city from the sweeping terrace of their restaurant/cocktail bar. Named after the nineteenth-century Portuguese King D Pedro V, this place certainly feels fit for royalty. Guests can enjoy sleek modern design, secure parking with valet service and a free walking tour that leaves from reception daily at 5pm.

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Hotels

Altis Avenida Hotel

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior

The five-star Altis Avenida harks back to the sumptuous design of the 1940s. Rich gold trim and slabs of marble run throughout, with lovely modernist touches. Despite the retro glamour, you can rest assured that they have all the mod cons. Enjoy an elegant lobby bar, rooftop restaurant (Rossio) and 24-hour room service. Plus they're pet-friendly, so you can bring Fido along (so long as he's under 15kg) and they'll provide a bed and bowls.

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Hotels

Hotel da Estrela

icon-location-pin Lisbon

With a lovely location in the old Palace of the Counts of Paraty, Hotel da Estrela enjoys something many hotels in Lisbon don't: outdoor space. The gardens of this modest luxury stay are beautifully kept, with a circular pond in the centre, and made private by the surrounding trees. There are only 19 rooms here, so exclusivity is the name of the game, and the staff will make you feel just as special.

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Hotels

AlmaLusa Baixa/Chiado

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior

Alma Lusa is modern and relaxed, geared towards a young crowd. It does have some elements of Portuguese history in its identity – the Alma Lusa Hotels group logo, for instance, is a traditional Portuguese knocker (no pun intended).

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Hotels

Torel Palace

icon-location-pin Lisbon

There can be no greater luxury than staying in the city centre while keeping the urban noise at bay and enjoying country-style tranquility. At Torel Palace, a boutique hotel consisting of two old palaces, you will find the best of two worlds: the speedy pace you would expect from a capital city and the peace and quiet you only obtain in a rural environment. One of the main features? Its unbeatable, instagrammable view: no other hotel spreads itself down a hill with such a fantastic view of the São Pedro de Alcântara Viewpoint, overlooking the Tagus and the Pombaline city centre.

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Hotels

The Independent Hostel and Suites

icon-location-pin Bairro Alto
The meeting point for Lisbon's coolest people to have a drink in the evening, eat dinner or have a Sunday brunch. 
Many people don't even know that beyond the Decadente and Insólito restaurant/bars there is a hotel both original and lively, one of the few in Lisbon with two very different lodging options: the economic one, with triple bunk beds, and the posh one, with double suites including a terrace facing the São Pedro de Alcântara viewpoint or the castle hill. 
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Hotels

Portugal Boutique Hotel

icon-location-pin Santa Maria Maior

Upon entering 4 João das Regras you will find an unusual lobby, with brass walls and marble columns welcoming you to the Boutique Hotel. Inside are 53 rooms in a contemporary style, low on frills but high on comfort, most of them facing the João das Regras street – named after a nobleman whose actual surname was João de Aregas; in the great game of telephone of history, the original Aregas became a rather more colourful 'Regras', the Portuguese word for 'rules'.

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Hotels

Hotel Fontecruz Lisboa

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade
Even before it opened, a neon sign blinked on its black tile facade announcing the arrival of a new boutique hotel at the Avenida da Liberdade. Nobody knew what it would be like, but you could predict it would be original and somewhat irreverent. It is a sort of punk outsider among a preppy lot, whose enviable confidence allows it to ignore the formality of its neighbours. It's a hotel that doesn't take itself seriously - but don't confuse playfulness with slackness.
 
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Hotels

As Janelas Verdes

icon-location-pin Santos

Graça Viterbo, one of the busiest interior decorators in the country, was tasked with turning a palace where writer Eça de Queirós once lived into a boutique hotel. Mission brilliantly accomplished: the result is there for all to see at the welcoming As Janelas Verdes, a 29-room manor where every corner has traces of the literary and artistic heritage of one of Portugal's most important novelists. There is a friendly mood to the place, perfect for lovebirds looking for the romantic side of Lisbon. 

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Fotografia: Ana Luzia
Hotels

Memmo Alfama Hotel

icon-location-pin Alfama
Any tourist guide worth its salt advises Alfama to anyone looking to settle in the heart of Lisbon.
A few years ago, the city's most traditional district had little to offer tourists apart from some local lodgings and budget hostels. A less money-conscious traveller looking for a fuller experience would have to look elsewhere. That lasted until the day the Memmo Group decided to up the stakes and start Alfama's first boutique hotel worthy of that name, youthful in spirit but much more ambitious than its neighbours. 
It is not a luxury hotel, neither is it meant to be one. 
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©Booking
Hotels

Inspira Santa Marta Hotel

icon-location-pin Avenida da Liberdade/Príncipe Real
At first, it seems a nondescript building. But it's like a Kinder chocolate egg – plain on the outside, full of surprises within. Upon stepping into the lobby, you will realize the hotel is much more ambitious than you might have previously thought. Don't expect gold-plated walls, but this utilitarian hotel has earned a positive reputation for its good taste and friendliness.
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Hotels

Palacio Ramalhete

icon-location-pin Santos
If you went to school in Portugal, the word 'Ramalhete' will immediately remind you of Eça de Queirós and his novel 'The Maias'. The word means 'bouquet', a theme reflected in the sunflowers portrayed in tiles along its stone steps. Located in the Janelas Verdes street, near the Museum of Ancient Art, this is much more than just a hotel with a pretty facade. Every one of its nine rooms and seven suites is unique. 
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Hotels

Internacional Design Hotel

icon-location-pin Baixa Pombalina
This one of those chicken-and-the-egg stories.
When you're talking about the International Design Hotel, you have to wonder what came first - was it the restaurant or the hotel? The hotel does sound like the parent and thus could play the chicken to the restaurant's proverbial egg – whose father is unknown. No really, the restaurant's name is Bastardo, and yes, it means that in Portuguese too. Bastardo displays the creative side of an illegitimate child of Portuguese cuisine. It has a teasing and biting sense of humour (the walls include paintings telling people to drop dead, but don't take them personally, OK?), and it is unpretentious. The same goes for the hotel, whose sole flaw is being rather small for all the stories it has to tell.
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Hotels

Lx Boutique Hotel

icon-location-pin Cais do Sodré

The ideal spot for lovebirds aged 20 to 30 who want to be in the heart of Lisbon's nightlife – the Cais do Sodré. Young and stylish enough, this 45-room boutique hotel is located in the nexus between the Chiado and the renewed Ribeira das Naus (a riverside “beach” of sorts). It is geared at young folks, to whom it caters with an artsy but relaxed vibe. 

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Hotels

York House Hotel Lisboa

icon-location-pin Santos
Lisbon has hundreds of centenary buildings, and renovated palaces are a major part of the hotel offerings. There's nothing wrong with that; indeed, part of the city's charm is precisely the boldness with which it displays its history. Another charming feature is that some hidden pearls can still be found in unlikely places. York House is one of those. Hidden in an old seventeenth-century convent in a Lapa hill facing the Tagus, this small boutique hotel has been open for business for more than 100 years. 
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Hotels

Santiago de Alfama

icon-location-pin Castelo de São Jorge

They say people are what's most important in a place, and they may be right. Santiago de Alfama might be valuable all by itself, but it would not be the same if not for the friendliness and warmth of the staff in charge, a fabulous experience would be downgraded to a merely nice one – that's not necessarily bad but it would not be the same. The Santiago's charm also comes from architect Luís Rebelo de Andrade's decision to maintain the original fifteenth-century design of the building, preserving the Roman fragments found during the renovation, uniting past and present under the same roof. 

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Hotels

Brown's Central Hotel

icon-location-pin Baixa Pombalina

Eighty-four rooms, and no two are alike. Some are Art Déco, others are classic, others modern and one of them even has a sloped ceiling as if it were an Alpine cabin. Brown's Central is everything but dull. Despite being located in the middle of Pombaline dowtown in an old building, it does not seek to impress through its link to the city's history. Instead, it breaks through the stigma of the hotel as a closed-off space to be a meeting point and an arts venue. 

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© Manuel Gomes da Costa
Hotels

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Fotografia: Matilde Cunha Vaz
Hotels

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