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The Book of Mormon

The Book of Mormon

Get involved in Time Out's exclusive pre-sale and no booking fee offer for the West End's rudest, lewdest and funniest musical . 

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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‘Company’ review

‘Company’ review

Marianne Elliott’s production of Stephen Sondheim’s 1970 musical comedy ‘Company’ was announced at what felt like some point in the late Cretaceous Period. And we knew from the get-go that the lead role of terminally single 35-year-old New Yorker Bobby (a man) would be gender switched to Bobbie (a woman), played by Rosalie Craig. The potential for this to be a novelty hung over it… but now that it’s here I’m going to cheerily declare that Elliott has found hidden depths in what was already a stone-cold classic. In 2018, when the borderline geriatric likes of Tom Cruise and Daniel Craig still regularly play sexy bachelors, the notion of a 35-year-old man being under any great pressure to settle down seems kind of quaint. But there is, of course, intense pressure for women to do so, before society deems them wanting for letting their youth and fertility run out. The nagging concerns heaped upon Bobbie for her singledom make total, crystal clear, perfectly realised sense. (NB Bobbie is straight, with the hopeless trio of lovers now men – a move that takes a certain misogynist sting out of the writing). ‘One is lonely and two is boring’ runs Sondheim’s most pithy summation of Bobbie’s dilemma, and it’s intentionally never resolved. Craig is immaculate as a hazy woman trapped in an existential funk. Her coupled-up friends have committed to things, and it hasn’t made them happy. So Bobbie remains an outsider in her own life, committed to nothing, a permanent glass of bourbon her

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Wicked review

Wicked review

Make your friends green with envy with tickets to the world's favourite musical

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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The Comedy About A Bank Robbery

The Comedy About A Bank Robbery

If you’re a plucky producer hoping to get your new show into the Criterion Theatre, you’re flat out of luck once again. Because less than nine months after 'The 39 Steps' shuttered after almost a decade glowering over Piccadilly Circus, it’s now home to the brand new comedy by Mischief Theatre, which, if there’s any justice in the theatre world, will run for even longer. 'The Comedy About A Bank Robbery' is the latest play by the bogglingly prolific and talented team behind 'The Play That Goes Wrong' (or more accurately the 'Play That Goes Wrong' franchise) and it’s their best and funniest work yet. A genre pastiche, screwball comedy and classic farce that’s as clean and clear as its brassy branding, it spins with a manic energy from Two Ronnies-esque wordplay through surreal set-pieces to slapstick stunts prepped to bring the house down. The story of a bungled jewel heist in a sleepy Minneapolis bank branch, it features a host of hilarious but well-drawn characters who roar across the stage and tumble into disaster after disaster, each one more elegantly drawn than the last. The writers’ ability to snatch a laugh out of every line, and to intricately prime each scenario with zinging punchlines and pay-offs is stunning, as call-backs and running gags pile up into teetering edifices of absurdity. The entire cast is bang on the money, but Mischief Theatre’s own Henry Lewis and Jonathan Sayer are the standouts as booming bank manager Robin Freeboys and hapless loser (and eter

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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‘The Wider Earth’ review

‘The Wider Earth’ review

We’re all so familiar with that photo of Charles Darwin – you know the one, it’s two-thirds beard – that we forget that the august father of the theory of evolution was ever a young, bright-eyed, idealistic man. In fact, when Darwin boarded the HMS Beagle for the five-year-voyage to South America, the Galápagos islands, New Zealand, Australia and South Africa that laid the foundations for his theory, he was only 22 years old.  Performed in a pop-up theatre in the actual Natural History Museum, ‘The Wider Earth’ follows the Beagle on its epic half-decade journey across the world. Young Darwin, played with declarative boyish earnestness by Bradley Foster, is a well-intentioned renegade with a lot of heart and rather less tact. The Beagle’s captain, a robust man of God named Robert FitzRoy (Jack Parry-Jones), has brought him aboard as the ship’s naturalist. Darwin gets his credentials straight for the audience early on. He quarrels with his captain about slavery, thinking it the most horrible thing he was ever seen. He reacts with innocent wonder to nature’s riches around him. He’s loveable, if a bit predictably nice.  These gold standards of character have to be set up in order for the play to tackle the thorny problems of empire, colonialism, and the sheer bloody terror of discovering that Christian scripture might have the whole creation thing wrong. David Morton’s script is replete with leitmotifs and call-backs, and in those there is a glimpse of deep feeling, but it's a

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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2-for-1 tickets to ‘Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-Garde’

2-for-1 tickets to ‘Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-Garde’

Explore modern art and modern love at this fascinating four-star show

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Up to 30% off ‘Marvel Avengers Station’ at ExCel London

Up to 30% off ‘Marvel Avengers Station’ at ExCel London

Wanna become a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe storyline?  

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2-for-1 tickets to ‘Mantegna and Bellini’ at the National Gallery

2-for-1 tickets to ‘Mantegna and Bellini’ at the National Gallery

See this five-star exhibition on art, family, rivalry and personality

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2-for-1 tickets to ‘Gainsborough’s Family Album’ at National Portrait Gallery

2-for-1 tickets to ‘Gainsborough’s Family Album’ at National Portrait Gallery

Get an insight into the private life of Thomas Gainsborough 

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Our favourite musicals

Everybody's Talking About Jamie

Everybody's Talking About Jamie

Don't miss out on this fabulous, feel-good, musical sensation. Tickets form £26.00

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Book now
Caroline, or Change

Caroline, or Change

Don't miss this fantastic revival of Tony Kushner‘s strange opera-musical set in civil rights-era Louisiana. 

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Come from Away

Come from Away

The big sleeper hit Broadway musical of the last few years, ‘Come from Away’ tells the unlikely true story of a sleepy Newfoundland town that took in strangers from around the world when their planes were grounded at the local airport in the wake of 9/11. A hit in Canada and the States, ‘Come from Away’ is written by Irene Sankoff and David Hein and is directed by Christopher Ashley, with musical staging by Kelly Devine. Expect to be very charmed.

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Matilda the Musical

Matilda the Musical

Treat the whole family to this multi-award winning musical from the Royal Shakespeare Company! 

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Our favourite plays

True West

True West

Kit Harrington and Johnny Flynn star as warring brothers in Sam Shepard‘s surreal thriller

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The Comedy About A Bank Robbery

The Comedy About A Bank Robbery

If you’re a plucky producer hoping to get your new show into the Criterion Theatre, you’re flat out of luck once again. Because less than nine months after 'The 39 Steps' shuttered after almost a decade glowering over Piccadilly Circus, it’s now home to the brand new comedy by Mischief Theatre, which, if there’s any justice in the theatre world, will run for even longer. 'The Comedy About A Bank Robbery' is the latest play by the bogglingly prolific and talented team behind 'The Play That Goes Wrong' (or more accurately the 'Play That Goes Wrong' franchise) and it’s their best and funniest work yet. A genre pastiche, screwball comedy and classic farce that’s as clean and clear as its brassy branding, it spins with a manic energy from Two Ronnies-esque wordplay through surreal set-pieces to slapstick stunts prepped to bring the house down. The story of a bungled jewel heist in a sleepy Minneapolis bank branch, it features a host of hilarious but well-drawn characters who roar across the stage and tumble into disaster after disaster, each one more elegantly drawn than the last. The writers’ ability to snatch a laugh out of every line, and to intricately prime each scenario with zinging punchlines and pay-offs is stunning, as call-backs and running gags pile up into teetering edifices of absurdity. The entire cast is bang on the money, but Mischief Theatre’s own Henry Lewis and Jonathan Sayer are the standouts as booming bank manager Robin Freeboys and hapless loser (and eter

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Buy
Betrayal

Betrayal

What a way to wrap up Jamie Lloyd’s epic Pinter at the Pinter season: megastar Tom Hiddleston will star in Pinter’s 1978 masterpiece ‘Betrayal’, a drama about a trio of self-decieving lovers which devastatingly unfolds in reverse chronological order. Hiddleston will play Robert (the other two cast members are tba), in a production directed by Lloyd himself.  Tickets onsale at 9am on Nov 30, or Nov 29 to ticket holders for other Pinter at the Pinter plays.

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‘True West’ review

‘True West’ review

Kit Harington: ‘I f**king hate snootiness in the theatre’ In the first ever West End outing for the late Sam Shepard’s 1980 classic, Kit Harington plays Austin, a screenwriter house-sitting for his mother while she’s away in Alaska. If you bought a ticket because he looked hot in ‘Game of Thrones’, you might be disappointed, because in ‘True West’ he’s kitted out like an ’80s porn mogul living in a suburban witness protection programme.  As Austin works doggedly away at the typewriter, pausing only to water his mother’s plants like a good boy, he’s interrupted by the arrival of Lee (Johnny Flynn). Despite being the ‘successful’ one of the family, Austin is bullied by his older, cowboy shirt-wearing brother, who derails Austin’s latest project and sells his own hee-hawing western flick to the producer instead. On paper, and to some extent on stage, Shepard’s premise is pretty fascinating. There’s a lot happening here with warring (and wounded) masculinities, particularly how Austin’s achievements in a metro elite career don’t prevent him being trounced by his loudmouth, swaggering sibling. And then there’s the storytelling aspect. Shepard’s fighting brothers have a mythical or biblical edge, a modern-day Cain and Abel or Romulus and Remus. The stories they’re writing are, in turn, also fables. Lee’s ‘true west’ script is based on an invented idea of the good ol’ U.S. of A., one filled with cattle trucks, car chases and wife-stealing ranch hands. But Matthew Dunster’s product

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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More great theatre tickets

Book of Mormon tickets

Book of Mormon tickets

It's the funniest musical in town...

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The Lion King tickets

The Lion King tickets

Nothing prepares you for the sheer impact of 'The Lion King's opening sequence...

Book now
Wicked tickets

Wicked tickets

The musical witches of this 'Wizard of Oz' prequel are still casting a spell over the West End

Book now
Everybody's Talking About Jamie tickets

Everybody's Talking About Jamie tickets

A staggeringly enjoyable musical about a teen drag queen

Book now
Les Miserables tickets

Les Miserables tickets

A storming revolutionary musical that has been stirring up audiences since 1985

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Time Out Live tickets

Silent Disco at The View From The Shard

Silent Disco at The View From The Shard

Go up the Shard and get down at our silent disco party, where you can combine banging beats with one of the best views in the city. 

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Our favourite attractions

SEA LIFE London Aquarium
Attractions Book online

SEA LIFE London Aquarium

Don't get into deep water looking for things to do, buy tickets to London's favourite marine-themed attraction - from £20

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Book online
Shrek's Adventure! London
Attractions Buy tickets

Shrek's Adventure! London

Embark on an epic adventure with your favourite ogre and Donkey - from just £18.20

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Warner Bros. Studio Tour London - The Making of Harry Potter
Attractions Book online

Warner Bros. Studio Tour London - The Making of Harry Potter

Take a magical tour around the studio where 'Harry Potter' was filmed and see fascinating props and sets - from £55

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
Book online
Buckingham Palace
Attractions Book online

Buckingham Palace

See one of Britain's most iconic buildings in a new light with a tour of Buckingham Palace and a spot at the Changing of the Guard Ceremony.

Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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The London Dungeon
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The London Dungeon

Get your chills and thrills at this spooky hot-spot - from just £23.20

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Book online