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Company

Company

Rosalie Craig and Patti LuPone star in Marianne Elliott’s tour de force reworking of Sondheim’s sardonic musical

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The Book of Mormon

The Book of Mormon

Get involved in Time Out's exclusive pre-sale and no booking fee offer for the West End's rudest, lewdest and funniest musical . 

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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‘Summer and Smoke’ review

‘Summer and Smoke’ review

Patsy Ferran is just astonishingly good in this welcome West End transfer of the Almeida Theatre’s acclaimed revival of Tennessee Williams’s ‘Summer and Smoke’. From when we encounter her, caught in darkness, convulsing uncontrollably in an unsparing spotlight, she effortlessly holds the stage.Ferran is Alma Winemiller, a minister’s daughter and singing teacher. As she cares for her mother, who has suffered a breakdown, and takes care of the family home, it’s clear she has become trapped by expectations and responsibilities. She’s nervy and on edge, prone to anxiety attacks.The play centres on Alma’s moth-like attraction to John Buchanan (Matthew Needham). He’s a resentful, angry man, a trainee doctor who tries to drown out his fears in booze and sex, while being drawn to Alma. Meanwhile, their small Mississippi town seethes in the summer months.The relationship between Alma and John is unbearable to watch at times. Still, Needham and Ferran exert a magnetic pull on our attention as they collide. Director Rebecca Frecknall strips it down to its painful essentials, rejecting the trend of some Williams revivals which have cast the women as neurotics and eroticised the malice of his men.Here, the characters are complicated and messy. A restless Needham slides into positions around the stage like stations en route to Alma’s seduction. He’s a darkening bruise of a boy, with charm and insecurity flicking into cruel, gaslighting behaviour. It’s a gripping, often ugly performance.Wha

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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42nd Street

42nd Street

Entrertainment doesn't get bigger than this! Book now with tickets starting from as little as £15. 

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Wicked

Wicked

Make your friends green with envy with tickets to the world's favourite musical. 

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Go out with Time Out

2-for-1 tickets to ‘Mantegna and Bellini’ at the National Gallery

2-for-1 tickets to ‘Mantegna and Bellini’ at the National Gallery

See this five-star exhibition on art, family, rivalry and personality

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55% off The Covent Garden Comedy Club at Heaven

55% off The Covent Garden Comedy Club at Heaven

Discounted weekend tickets at one of London’s top comedy clubs 

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2-for-1 tickets to ‘Gainsborough’s Family Album’ at National Portrait Gallery

2-for-1 tickets to ‘Gainsborough’s Family Album’ at National Portrait Gallery

Get an insight into the private life of Thomas Gainsborough 

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RSC Barbican Season

RSC Barbican Season

 Tickets now available via Time Out from only £13!

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Our favourite musicals

‘The Band’ review

‘The Band’ review

Remember Take That? Well, hold on to those memories because, songs aside, there’s precious little of the ’90s boyband in Gary Barlow’s jukebox musical ‘The Band’, which trundles into the West End after a lengthy UK tour. The five sweet-voiced guys on stage – winners of the Barlow-presided TV contest ‘Let It Shine’ – are just abs-y window dressing in a show that’s really about music fandom, growing up, and most of all female friendship. Tim Firth’s story centres on five totally, refreshingly ordinary teenage girls who have a primal obsession with a boyband, its music the glitter glue that holds their friendship fast. Except then, 25 years slip by and they hardly know each other anymore. And the songs that saved their lives when they were 16 are now the only thing that can help them. What little plot there is centres on this group’s attempt to see the band on their comeback tour in Prague, which results in some totally ludicrous situations. A highlight is seeing these forty-something women frolic in a fountain that features the five-strong band masquerading as statues, coated in grey latex. But this gaggle are arguably more satisfying to watch as teenagers, all gobby energy, excitedly taping ‘Top of the Pops’ and begging for a free bus ride home from their first concert after they spend all their money on merch. The show’s most poignant moment comes in the second half, when their 40-something selves sing ‘Back for Good’ to their younger selves, in an almost unbearably vivi

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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Caroline, or Change

Caroline, or Change

Don't miss this fantastic revival of Tony Kushner‘s strange opera-musical set in civil rights-era Louisiana. 

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Come from Away

Come from Away

The big sleeper hit Broadway musical of the last few years, ‘Come from Away’ tells the unlikely true story of a sleepy Newfoundland town that took in strangers from around the world when their planes were grounded at the local airport in the wake of 9/11. A hit in Canada and the States, ‘Come from Away’ is written by Irene Sankoff and David Hein and is directed by Christopher Ashley, with musical staging by Kelly Devine. Expect to be very charmed.

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Kinky Boots

Kinky Boots

See the sassy show that's kicking up a storm all over the world! 

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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Find more musicals

Our favourite plays

Betrayal

Betrayal

What a way to wrap up Jamie Lloyd’s epic Pinter at the Pinter season: megastar Tom Hiddleston will star in Pinter’s 1978 masterpiece ‘Betrayal’, a drama about a trio of self-decieving lovers which devastatingly unfolds in reverse chronological order. Hiddleston will play Robert (the other two cast members are tba), in a production directed by Lloyd himself.  Tickets onsale at 9am on Nov 30, or Nov 29 to ticket holders for other Pinter at the Pinter plays.

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‘True West’ review

‘True West’ review

Kit Harington: ‘I f**king hate snootiness in the theatre’ In the first ever West End outing for the late Sam Shepard’s 1980 classic, Kit Harington plays Austin, a screenwriter house-sitting for his mother while she’s away in Alaska. If you bought a ticket because he looked hot in ‘Game of Thrones’, you might be disappointed, because in ‘True West’ he’s kitted out like an ’80s porn mogul living in a suburban witness protection programme.  As Austin works doggedly away at the typewriter, pausing only to water his mother’s plants like a good boy, he’s interrupted by the arrival of Lee (Johnny Flynn). Despite being the ‘successful’ one of the family, Austin is bullied by his older, cowboy shirt-wearing brother, who derails Austin’s latest project and sells his own hee-hawing western flick to the producer instead. On paper, and to some extent on stage, Shepard’s premise is pretty fascinating. There’s a lot happening here with warring (and wounded) masculinities, particularly how Austin’s achievements in a metro elite career don’t prevent him being trounced by his loudmouth, swaggering sibling. And then there’s the storytelling aspect. Shepard’s fighting brothers have a mythical or biblical edge, a modern-day Cain and Abel or Romulus and Remus. The stories they’re writing are, in turn, also fables. Lee’s ‘true west’ script is based on an invented idea of the good ol’ U.S. of A., one filled with cattle trucks, car chases and wife-stealing ranch hands. But Matthew Dunster’s product

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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‘A Christmas Carol’ review

‘A Christmas Carol’ review

I didn’t see Rhys Ifans in Matthew Warchus’s production of ‘A Christmas Carol’ last year and I’m glad. He’s always a bit self-consciously ‘Rhys Ifans’, and you absolutely definitely must not doubt the sincerity of this Scrooge if this big, open-hearted test of theatrical nerve is going to come off. If you reckon Dickens paints in broad emotional strokes, hold on to your (top) hat: Jack Thorne’s version of ‘A Christmas Carol’ makes ‘EastEnders’ look like Ibsen.Stephen Tompkinson’s Scrooge starts off physically and emotionally cumbersome. He’s a kind of lumbering Anti-Santa: an un-jolly old man who goes round depriving people of stuff. It’s an interesting take on the part: as the ghosts show him the errors of his grasping, wasted life, he’s all Northern bluster and defensiveness. Around him, there’s carol-singing, there’s clog-dancing, there’s handbell-ringing (and plenty of hand-wringing). It’s like the blinking Olympic Opening Ceremony or something. There are also several stunning pieces of visual theatre: Marley’s ghost dragging a huge, Lady Di-wedding dress train of clanking chains; Scrooge alone beside a coffin on a wheeled carriage containing his future corpse.It’s sort of impossible not to read it all as a Brexit parable: Scrooge is cut off from the whirl of life around him by greed and fear and regret, pursuing his path with blinkered self-delusion. ‘No exceptions!’ he cries when called to account for beggaring the first man to show him kindness. Rob Howell’s minimal se

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Buy
‘Summer and Smoke’ review

‘Summer and Smoke’ review

Patsy Ferran is just astonishingly good in this welcome West End transfer of the Almeida Theatre’s acclaimed revival of Tennessee Williams’s ‘Summer and Smoke’. From when we encounter her, caught in darkness, convulsing uncontrollably in an unsparing spotlight, she effortlessly holds the stage.Ferran is Alma Winemiller, a minister’s daughter and singing teacher. As she cares for her mother, who has suffered a breakdown, and takes care of the family home, it’s clear she has become trapped by expectations and responsibilities. She’s nervy and on edge, prone to anxiety attacks.The play centres on Alma’s moth-like attraction to John Buchanan (Matthew Needham). He’s a resentful, angry man, a trainee doctor who tries to drown out his fears in booze and sex, while being drawn to Alma. Meanwhile, their small Mississippi town seethes in the summer months.The relationship between Alma and John is unbearable to watch at times. Still, Needham and Ferran exert a magnetic pull on our attention as they collide. Director Rebecca Frecknall strips it down to its painful essentials, rejecting the trend of some Williams revivals which have cast the women as neurotics and eroticised the malice of his men.Here, the characters are complicated and messy. A restless Needham slides into positions around the stage like stations en route to Alma’s seduction. He’s a darkening bruise of a boy, with charm and insecurity flicking into cruel, gaslighting behaviour. It’s a gripping, often ugly performance.Wha

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Buy
Find more plays

More great theatre tickets

Book of Mormon tickets

Book of Mormon tickets

It's the funniest musical in town...

Book now
The Lion King tickets

The Lion King tickets

Nothing prepares you for the sheer impact of 'The Lion King's opening sequence...

Book now
Wicked tickets

Wicked tickets

The musical witches of this 'Wizard of Oz' prequel are still casting a spell over the West End

Book now
Everybody's Talking About Jamie tickets

Everybody's Talking About Jamie tickets

A staggeringly enjoyable musical about a teen drag queen

Book now
Les Miserables tickets

Les Miserables tickets

A storming revolutionary musical that has been stirring up audiences since 1985

Book now

Time Out Live tickets

Hotboozapalooza

Hotboozapalooza

Down with mulled wine; it’s hot cocktail time.

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Battle of the Broth

Battle of the Broth

Six top London noodle soup makers will pit their bowls of deliciousness against each other. For just £20 try them all, then dish up your verdict.

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Our favourite attractions

SEA LIFE London Aquarium
Attractions

SEA LIFE London Aquarium

Don't get into deep water looking for things to do, buy tickets to London's favourite marine-themed attraction - from £20

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Shrek's Adventure! London
Attractions Buy tickets

Shrek's Adventure! London

Embark on an epic adventure with your favourite ogre and Donkey - from just £18.20

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Warner Bros. Studio Tour London - The Making of Harry Potter
Attractions Book online

Warner Bros. Studio Tour London - The Making of Harry Potter

Take a magical tour around the studio where 'Harry Potter' was filmed and see fascinating props and sets - from £55

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
Book online
Buckingham Palace
Attractions Book online

Buckingham Palace

See one of Britain's most iconic buildings in a new light with a tour of Buckingham Palace and a spot at the Changing of the Guard Ceremony.

Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Book online
The London Dungeon
Attractions Book online

The London Dungeon

Get your chills and thrills at this spooky hot-spot - from just £23.20

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Book online