Review: "Between This Light and That Space"

A group show in which less serves up a whole lot of more.

  • Photograph: Courtesy Minus Space

    "Between This Light and That Space," Installation view

    "Between This Light and That Space", installation view

  • Photograph: Courtesy Minus Space

    "Between This Light and That Space," Installation view

    "Between This Light and That Space", installation view

Photograph: Courtesy Minus Space

"Between This Light and That Space," Installation view

"Between This Light and That Space", installation view

Time Out Ratings :

<strong>Rating: </strong>4/5

Summer group shows. Have you noticed how 90 percent of them include too much work? Enter Minus Space, and you'll see how hot-weather curating ought to be done: with a philosophy of less is more. Douglas Melini, an abstract painter with an eye for weird confluences of geometry, texture and pattern, has picked 11 works by seven artists. His selections are as intuitive as they are spot-on, and the space practically hums with a soft, yet satisfying, optical buzz.

Installation artist Elana Herzog surprises by offering discrete, stand-alone works. One of the smallest features a shape that looks like the African continent, festooned with fluffy mountain ranges made of fabric. In Palma Blank's Grey, Purple Diagonals with Yellow Cut-Out, shapes seem to magically float and shift from foreground to background. Michelle Grabner employs spray-on flocking and enamel paint to achieve one X-shaped composition—a weirdly compelling duel between fuzzy blanket and hard grid. Carrie Pollack steals the show, quietly, with a b&w digital print on canvas of a subject as simple as the sky. Meanwhile, hanging from the ceiling's center is a gently rotating mirrored mobile by Anne Eastman. It further reflects and refracts everything in this already trippy show.

Did we mention that women artists make up the entire exhibit? That's a rebalance more male curators should take notice of.

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Minus Space, through July 30;