Review: "Craig Taylor: Paintings and Drawings"

Taylor's work makes you try to see things.

  • Photograph: Courtesy Sue Scott Gallery

    Craig Taylor, Amplifier Artifact

    Craig Taylor, Amplifier Artifact

  • Photograph: Courtesy Sue Scott Gallery

    Craig Taylor, Field Augmentation

    Craig Taylor, Field Augmentation

  • Photograph: Courtesy Sue Scott Gallery

    Craig Taylor, Gesture-Driven-Interface

    Craig Taylor, Gesture-Driven-Interface

  • Photograph: Courtesy Sue Scott Gallery

    Craig Taylor, My Foamy Decline

    Craig Taylor, My Foamy Decline

  • Photograph: Courtesy Sue Scott Gallery

    Craig Taylor, Pastoral

    Craig Taylor, Pastoral

Photograph: Courtesy Sue Scott Gallery

Craig Taylor, Amplifier Artifact

Craig Taylor, Amplifier Artifact

Time Out Ratings :

<strong>Rating: </strong>4/5

In Craig Taylor's latest canvases and works on paper, remnants of cartoonish forms are blasted and strewn about an imaginary color world like ruins in a landscape. Using an AbEx directness, Taylor limns slashes, stripes and blotches that seem to cohere for a moment into vaguely recognizable shapes before dissipating just as quickly into a primitive form of pixelation or, perhaps, a buzzing thermosphere. His palette ranges from ghostly pale and closely hued to high-key, high-contrast and electrified.

In The Unsuspected Source of Sensations, the composition is dominated by a transparent orange-and-green structure that looks like the top half of a block-letter E in reverse. Appearing to have gobbled up a swarm of sulfur-yellow blobs, it is a self-generating nonsense machine that is part glyph, part megalith.

Taylor employs color to create not just light but an amped-up glow, and he uses his painterly scrawl to both generate and break down recognizable forms. The result is a varied amalgam of pictorial information that deflects understanding while playfully inviting us to try to figure things out.

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Sue Scott Gallery, through Aug 5;