Laurent Grasso: Soleil Double

Art, Installation Free
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 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Laurent Grasso, 'Soleil double' (film) / Courtesy Galerie Perrotin)
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Laurent Grasso, 'Soleil double' (film) / Courtesy Galerie Perrotin
 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB)
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Vue de l'exposition de Laurent Grasso / © TB
 (Laurent Grasso, 'Studies into the Past' / Courtesy Galerie Perrotin)
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Laurent Grasso, 'Studies into the Past' / Courtesy Galerie Perrotin

Laurent Grasso's oneiric visuals swallow up their audience like a pot of Nutella traps flies. Strange, playful, variant in form and scale but consistent in their suspicion of asserted 'truths', his works constitute a universe at once familiar and deeply uncanny. Anachronisms and supernatural phenomena rule; nothings is to be taken at face value.

In 'Soleil Double', which has already opened to great acclaim in New York, Grasso refines these preoccupations into a sly critique of doctrine – whether preached by the intellectuals, the Vatican, or artists themselves. The installation itself is ambitious: a labyrinth of sculpture, paintings, photographs, video and works in neon. Classical and Renaissance Italy are obvious reference points, but so is science fiction: knights in shining armour duke it out under the threat of abduction by UFO, as the twin suns of the title stare down menacingly. The mash-up of styles from different historical periods – an artistic masterstroke in itself – is the key to understanding his the artist's creed: that history is misleading, knowledge is an illusion, and the only certainty is that there are none. Except, perhaps, for one: this is the must-see exhibition of the season.

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