Markus Lüpertz

Art, Painting
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 (Markus Lüpertz, 'Gescheiterte Hoffnung' (détail), 1967 / Galerie Christine / © ADAGP, Paris 2015)
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Markus Lüpertz, 'Gescheiterte Hoffnung' (détail), 1967 / Galerie Christine / © ADAGP, Paris 2015
 (Markus Lüpertz, 'Mozart', 2005, Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris / © ADAGP, Paris 2015)
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Markus Lüpertz, 'Mozart', 2005, Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris / © ADAGP, Paris 2015
 (Markus Lüpertz, 'Sans titre', 2013 / Galerie Werner / © ADAGP, Paris 2015)
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Markus Lüpertz, 'Sans titre', 2013 / Galerie Werner / © ADAGP, Paris 2015
 (Markus Lüpertz, 'Schwarz Rot Gold I - dithyrambisch', 1974, Kunstmuseum / © ADAGP, Paris 2015)
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Markus Lüpertz, 'Schwarz Rot Gold I - dithyrambisch', 1974, Kunstmuseum / © ADAGP, Paris 2015
 (Markus Lüpertz, 'Rückenakt', 2006 / Galerie Michael Werner / © ADAGP, Paris 2015)
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Markus Lüpertz, 'Rückenakt', 2006 / Galerie Michael Werner / © ADAGP, Paris 2015
 (Andreas Mühe, Portrait de l'artiste dans son atelier, 2014 / © Andreas Mühe)
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Andreas Mühe, Portrait de l'artiste dans son atelier, 2014 / © Andreas Mühe

He was one of the children born during WW2 who made up the 'Berlin School' of painting in France during the 1970s, which included Anselm Kiefer, Georg Baselitz, Sigmar Polke, A.R. Penck and Gerhard Richter – but bizarrely few people have heard of Markus Lüpertz. In Germany he's one of the big hitters of neo-expressionism, and one of the foremost figures leading a young generation who are resistant to conceptual, informal, abstract art. This spring, the Musée d'Art Moderne is putting him in his rightful place with a big retrospective where his dented, dislocated and vibrantly colourful works suggest as much tribal art or antiquity as they do German expressionism.

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