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Things to do in Paris

The Time Out Paris hot list
Things to do

The Time Out Paris hot list

Read on for our guide to the week's coolest events and most interesting venues. If you manage to tick off all ten, head back to our home page for daily updates on the best restaurants, cultural events, nightlife, and whatever else Paris manages to think up before our next Hot List is published on Monday. 

Your perfect weekend in Paris
Things to do

Your perfect weekend in Paris

Make the most of those two sweet days of downtime with our guide to the weekend's best events and activities. We've selected the best galleries, concerts, gigs, cafés, restaurants, bars, clubs, films and more, to make sure you enjoy every minute of your weekend in Paris. 

101 things to do in Paris
Things to do

101 things to do in Paris

Welcome to the definitive guide to getting the most out of Paris, be you visiting for a weekend or two weeks. Read on for our list of the 101 best things to do in the capital, put together by Time Out’s expert writers and editors. With activities ranging from scaling famous monuments to secret shopping passageways, and from peaceful parks to fast and furious nights out on the town, we've got you covered whatever you're looking for in Paris.

50 things for kids to do in Paris
Kids

50 things for kids to do in Paris

Follow our guide to the 50 best things to do with kids in Paris to find child-friendly restaurants, weird and wonderful museums, safe and fun places to play outside and all sorts of activities whatever the weather. Whether you want to go shopping for your toddler or find an alternative to queuing for the Eiffel Tower, we've got your family holiday in Paris covered.

Swimming pools in Paris
Sport and fitness

Swimming pools in Paris

When Paris's legendary Piscine Molitor – Art Deco showpiece, birthplace of the bikini (and, er, the 'monokini'), star of 'Life of Pi', playground for graffiti artists and ravers – reopened in May 2014, it wasn't in order to welcome back its old public. After languishing in redevelopment limbo for two decades, the pool was eventually snapped up by hotel group Accor, who resolved to convert the site's historic appeal into a luxury brand. The result: a high-end hotel-pool resort that looks good, but costs €180 for a day pass. Parisians are up in arms.Luckily for them, their city abounds in attractive pools that don't cost half a week's wages to access. From the exotic facilities of the Centre Aquatique de Neuilly-sur-Seine (fake beaches, anyone?) to the naturist evenings at the Roger Le Gall, the Olympic dimensions of the Georges-Vallerey to the dramatic steel structure of the Josephine Baker, these venues offer everything that an overheated Parisian could want. So don your gaudiest swimsuit, grab your coppers for the lockers, and head over for a dip.

Paris’s best parks and gardens
Attractions

Paris’s best parks and gardens

For a 105km2 city crammed inside a ring road (la péripherique), Paris has rather a lot of parks. Pack a picnic, take a leisurely stroll, or park yourself on a shaded bench somewhere on this list. If you fancy getting sporty, head to one of the city's 'bois' – former royal hunting grounds, just beyond today's centre, where the verdant expanses provide endless boating, walking and cycling opportunities.

Guide to the suburbs of Paris
Things to do

Guide to the suburbs of Paris

When François Hollande's culture minister described London as a 'suburb of Paris', she didn't mean it as a compliment to either. Her point was that London is an uglier, more dangerous version of the French capital; at a stroke, she'd denigrated her Anglo-Saxon neighbours and encapsulated Parisians' often contemptuous view of their own suburbs. We're going to turn the comparison on its head: the much maligned banlieue of the French capital is effectively a major city in its own right, in terms of both population – roughly ten million to central Paris's two – and the cultural activity that such a large bulk of people entails.Brutally severed from the tourist's mental map of Paris by the Boulevard Périphérique, the sprawling suburbs have since been cemented in the popular imagination as a terra incognita of gangs and grey buildings. This is unfair. While it's true that vast swathes of the banlieue have nothing to offer to anyone who doesn't live there, and some areas are crime hotspots, a bit of exploring yields delights: parks too big to fit within the Périph', clubs edgier than anything the mainstream central neighbourhoods have to offer, and scores of weird 'n' wonderful theatres and bars. The area is well served by the winding tentacles of the RER and outer Métro lines, and the residents, far from the pariahs the media often portray them to be, constitute some of the most vibrant of Paris's many communities. Clearly, it's somewhere worth knowing.So read on for our guide to t

Paris Plages
Things to do

Paris Plages

If there’s one event that sums up Paris in the summer, this is it. Back in 2002, Mayor Bertrand Delanoë began the tradition of lining the banks of the Seine with sand, deckchairs, food stalls and volleyball nets, creating a series of city beaches for those stuck in town during the long hot months. Since 2007 the project has extended along the length of the canal in Bassin de la Villette, making an idyllic summer landscape of pétanque, boules, picnicking, sunbathing and watersports.Paris Plages runs from July 28 until August 18. More details here.See a longer list of summer terraces here.

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Restaurants and cafés

The 100 best restaurants in Paris
Restaurants

The 100 best restaurants in Paris

The search for a good restaurant is never complete in a city like Paris. Our favourite spots of yesteryear close down, and snazzy new venues take their place; cuisines fall out of fashion, and new trends suddenly crop up. We've kept our fingers on the pulse, and concocted a list of the 100 best restaurants in Paris for 2015. The selection is divided into ten categories – everything from budget to haute cuisine, Asian to French traditional – to help you hone in on the kind of food you like. Our criteria weren't strict, but the restaurants that have made the cut all offer something beyond a merely good meal – whether it's originality, cosiness, value for money, or even mini waffles. It's not a definitive list, and if you feel we've missed out some top-notch places, let us know in the comments box below. But if you read on, you'll find that there's definitely enough to keep your tastebuds happy. Bon appétit!

The 50 best dishes in Paris
Restaurants

The 50 best dishes in Paris

There may be a fair few snails, slabs of red meat and curious bits of offal in our selection of the 50 best dishes in Paris, but there are also things that will surprise fans of French cooking. Cannelloni? Ramen? Cari from Réunion? Sauerkraut? Today, Paris's timeless bistros and brasseries rub shoulders comfortably with hundreds of restaurants, cafés and canteens serving food from all over France and from around the world. This snapshot of just 50 dishes out of thousands of possibilities gives an image of cooking and eating in Paris at its best: full of tradition and invention, talent and enthusiasm, generosity and greed. These are our editors' favourite dishes (and the restaurants that serve them) in that they're what we consider essential to getting a rounded sense of the city 's food scene. Have we missed one of your favourite Parisian dishes? Think you know a better version than the one we've chosen? Join the conversation in the comments box below. 

The best brunches in Paris
Restaurants

The best brunches in Paris

'Bruncher' is an established verb in Paris, which should give you an idea of the enthusiasm with which the French capital has adopted this American institution. The city seems to be made for long, indulgent weekend meals washed down with coffee, cocktails and a generous dose of people-watching. Here, we've selected our favourite Paris brunch restaurants serving moreish bacon and eggs, gluten-free goodness and simple all-you-can-eat blowouts. Think we've missed a great Paris brunch? Let us know in the comments below.

Vegetarian restaurants in Paris
Restaurants

Vegetarian restaurants in Paris

Don't let anyone tell you Paris doesn't cater for vegetarian and vegan diets – if you know where to look, delicious wholesome goodness is easily available. The trend for gluten-free is kicking off as well, relief for allergy sufferers and fans of wheatless cooking. Our selection of excellent bakeries, restaurants and cafés offer everything from gluten-free brunches to vegan cupcakes – get stuck in!

Street food in Paris
Restaurants

Street food in Paris

Street food: a simple concept, almost as old as streets themselves, which is now taking off in Paris despite a slow start. Prepared and/or sold on the city's pavements (to the extent permitted by the law), and designed to be easily eaten on the fly, this not-so-haute cuisine runs the gamut from sandwiches to kebabs, empañadas to dim sum, without ever breaking the bank. Read on for our recommendations.

Middle Eastern restaurants in Paris
Restaurants

Middle Eastern restaurants in Paris

Any feature on 'Middle Eastern cuisine' has to begin by confronting that problematic term. To the newbie, the cuisines of Morocco, Lebanon and Kurdistan all too easily merge into one aromatic morass of mezze and grilled meat. But in reality, they differ – at times subtly, at times blatantly – on everything from taste in condiments to table etiquette. To make matters simple, we've decided to split our fave Middle Eastern joints into three broad categories: North African, Asian, and 'street food'. If there's one thing they all share, it's a convivial emphasis on sharing and socialising – in our eyes, an essential ingredient to a damn good meal. So call up your mates and get ready to discover the best Levantine nosh and Maghrebian grub that Paris has to offer.

The best Vietnamese restaurants in Paris
Restaurants

The best Vietnamese restaurants in Paris

Whether you're after Bánh mì or a smoking bowl of Pho, Paris boasts more than enough Vietnamese restaurants to satisfy your cravings. The 13th arrondissement in particular is teeming with restaurants offering the best Vietnamese food around. There are speciality restaurants dotted all around the city however, so wherever you are and whatever dish you're in the mood for, there'll be a Vietnamese restaurant serving it. Here’s our editors’ pick of the very best in town. Enjoy. 

The best Chinese restaurants in Paris
Restaurants

The best Chinese restaurants in Paris

Book ahead to celebrate the Year of the Horse in one of our best Chinese restaurants this Chinese New Year (January 31). Paris has two main areas for Asian eating: Belleville and Chinatown in the 13th arrondissement, where you can sample excellent Thai, Vietnamese and other South East Asian specialities. Also check out our selection of Vietnamese restaurants in Paris – their Têt Nguyên Dán falls on the same day.

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Bars

The 100 best bars in Paris
Bars and pubs

The 100 best bars in Paris

Paris's drinking scene is one of the best and most diverse in the world, with speciality wine bars, craft beer bars and cocktail clubs constantly cropping up across the city. Here's a selection of the best places in Paris to go to get tipsy, tried and tested by Time Out experts. Cheers — or as the French would say — Tchin tchin! 

The best outdoor bars in Paris
Bars and pubs

The best outdoor bars in Paris

Sip on a pint and soak up the sun at these glorious outdoor bars 

The best table football bars in Paris
Bars and pubs

The best table football bars in Paris

There's something compulsive about watching twenty-two men spin around on the spot with all the artlessness of the English national team. No matter the crowd, no matter the vibe, we believe that every bar is better off with a table football table tucked away in a corner somewhere – heck, we've even set one up in the Time Out offices to keep us sane. For a while, it seemed as if trends had overtaken us and foosball was on its way out of the capital; but whether because of Brasil 2014, anticipation of the France 2016 Euro Cup, or simply a collective brainwave on the part of bar managers across the city, the tables are creeping back into Paris's bars. These, then, are the best places to go for a pint and a game or three. Just remember: No spinning.

Secret bars in Paris
Bars and pubs

Secret bars in Paris

In a city saturated with tourists, it's all too easy to forget that there's more to Parisian nightlife than glitzy clubs and overpriced brasseries milking some obscure connection to Hemingway for all its worth. The premium on space in the city has pushed the alternative scene far away, whether to the whispered-of warehouse raves out in the sticks or to the literally underground parties in the catacombs. While you try in vain to get yourself invited to either, we've compiled a list of our six favourite inner-city venues that, despite their popularity with locals and long-time residents, tend to get overlooked by the mainstream crowd. Come here to eat, drink, dance, rap, be rapped at, unwind to smooth jazz, then start all over again come the early hours.Got a favourite secret bar you want to share? Let us know in the comments box below. To discover more offbeat gems, including restaurants, galleries and parks, visit our Secret Paris page.

Bars with board games
Bars and pubs

Bars with board games

What's your poison? Be it Trivial Pursuit or pétanque, no city bar list is complete without a roundup of places to have a gentle game or two over a drink. Of course, things can get a little whackier than Scrabble – check out our selection to get involved in everything from brain-bending French dictation to Star Wars-themed sushi.

Jazz clubs and bars
Bars and pubs

Jazz clubs and bars

In the city that owned the jazz age, it would be rude not to 

Beer in Paris
Bars and pubs

Beer in Paris

The French live on wine, celebrate with champagne, and crack out the crème de cassis in their mellower moments; yet until recently, their passion for booze didn't quite extend to beer. But in Paris, a new fad for beer merchants and craft breweries is changing things. No longer are thirsty tourists from Nordic countries obliged to make do with ludicrously priced half-pints of Kronenbourg – suddenly suds looms lager than life over the capital's bar scene, as Parisians indulge a newfound obsession with artisanal ales and other malty alternatives to their beloved wine. Never one to turn down a pint or four, Time Out has checked out the best bars and coolest shops for buying and consuming brewskis – we can barley contain our excitement.

Top 10 gay bars in Paris
Bars and pubs

Top 10 gay bars in Paris

Paris is a European capital for all things gay and fabulous, from extravagant local personalities to a neighborhood teeming with addresses for a night of cavorting. The Marais, centrally-located just north of the Hôtel de Ville and south of the Place de la République, is the epicenter for nightlife catering to boys and men of all walks, but it's just the beginning. Starting an evening in or around the Marais is the best way to find out from the locals what's going on in other gay bars around town. Whether you're looking to share casual drinks, dance until dawn, or have a brush with a local Parisian, there's fun to be had any night of the week. 

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Film

The 100 best French films
Film

The 100 best French films

What are the greatest French movies ever made? 'Les Enfants du Paradis'? 'La Haine'? 'Taxi'? In an effort to find out Time Out launches a major new project: 'The 100 Best Fench films' – as voted by the film industry itself. Over the past few months, we've polled a select group of actors, directors, writers, producers, critics and other industry bigwigs to discover their favourite ten French films.  From there, taking into account the choices of our contributors, we've compiled a countdown of the 100 best French films of all time – with commentary from our critics on every movie listed. You can also read every contributor's top tens over on our French site. So the only question left to answer is: what do you think? Tell us your favourite French films here. 

The 50 most romantic films ever
Film

The 50 most romantic films ever

The word 'romance' derives from the name of the vernacular language of medieval France, in which tales of chivalry and desire would be written for the masses who couldn't read Latin. It's a fitting etymology, for common wisdom (and many a travel agency's ad campaign) tells us that love is the lingua franca of the French – and especially of the hyper-amorous Parisians. With this in mind (and heart), we've compiled a list of the 50 most romantic films of all time. Needless to say, French films feature heavily; but far from monopolising the list, they sit alongside some beautiful movies from Britain, America, Japan, Italy, Iran, India and the Ukraine. After all, love knows no borders.Have we missed out your favourite romance? Let us know in the comment box below.

Contes et Féeries
Film

Contes et Féeries

Surprise your iPad-addicted offspring with a series of silent film screenings for kids at the Fondation Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé in the 13th arrondissement. 'Contes et Féeries' ('Stories and Fairy tales') takes place twice a week, inviting film lovers from the age of six upwards to come and enjoy early adaptations of classics such as 'Cinderella', 'Tom Thumb', 'Sleeping Beauty' and 'Aladdin'. A world away from the catchy soundtracks and visual complexity of recent Disney releases, these silent films made during the early 1900s are an alternative introduction to the world of cinema for children. Talented young pianist Thomas Ospital plays along to the images. >> Wednesday 2pm and Saturday 11am at the Fondation Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé. Check out the list of screenings here. 

The 50 best films set in Paris
Film

The 50 best films set in Paris

Below, we present the 50 best films set in Paris, organised by era. Be they Nouvelle Vague masterpieces or populist comedies, the capital is always in the starring role. Romance blooms on a belle époque street corner. A dark-eyed girl in Montmartre runs her hand through a bag of dried beans. In the suburbs, Arabs square up to skinheads. Nicotine-stained tales of sexual misadventure unfold in beds all over the city, while gangsters commit crimes and cartoon rats cook up a storm. Paris, which boasts a higher concentration of picture houses than any other city, has been the inspiration and the backdrop for countless films. 

Popcorn Project at Club de l'Etoile
Cinemas

Popcorn Project at Club de l'Etoile

Reinventing the experience of going to the movies, the Popcorn Project at Club de l’Etoile is a ‘social cine-club’ that combines cinema with cocktails and chat: they show classic films and indie treasures (often in English with French subtitles) once a month, buoyed by cocktails, a buffet, music and plenty of discussion (in French). Check out the 2014 programme and book online here.

La Cinémathèque Française

La Cinémathèque Française

Relocated to Frank Gehry's striking, spacious cubist building, the Cinémathèque Française now boasts four screens, a bookshop, a restaurant, exhibition space and the superb Musée du Cinéma. In the spirit of its founder Henri Langlois, the Cinémathèque hosts retrospectives, cult movies, classics, experimental cinema and Q&A sessions.The Musée alone is worth the trip. As you wind your way through its shadowy rooms, you’ll be forgiven for thinking you’re being watched – everywhere you look, there’s a hundred-year-old camera or projector staring back at you. The exhibition takes you from the birth of cinema in 19th-century ‘magic lanterns’ and optical illusions through to the first golden age of the Hollywood studios in the 30s. Along the way, you encounter looped projections of silent films, a panoply of Kinetoscopes and Mutoscopes (just wait and see), and a treasure trove of movie memorabilia collected by Langlois over the course of his eventful life. Captions are mostly in French, but the English audio guide helps. In any case, these wonderful exhibits and moving images speak for themselves.Museum opening hours: Mon-Sat 12pm-7pm; Sun 10am-8pm.Full price: €5. Discounted: €4. Under 12s: €2.50. Entry + film ticket: €8.

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The 30 best animated short films ever made
Film

The 30 best animated short films ever made

For many, animation is a world of cute animals, sarcastic ogres, CGI heroes and exotic Japanese creatures – a world governed by a handful of big studios and the occasional European auteur who’s made it big. But to hardcore animation fans, this is only part of the story.The time and cost involved in producing an entire feature film means that many of the world’s most respected, talented and imaginative animators simply never have the chance to do so, so it’s in the world of the short film that they must grow their reputation and develop their art. The result is that some of the most funny, entertaining, technically groundbreaking animated movies are never seen by the wider public – until now. Here’s our selection of the 30 best animated short films ever made.

Vintage Paris on film
Film

Vintage Paris on film

The 10 best films set in the Paris of yesteryear, from the silent era to the New Wave 

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Art and culture

Art Museums
Art

Art Museums

You’ll be hard-pushed to find a greater display of paintings than in Paris: The ‘isms’ – Fauvism, Cubism, Impressionism, Modernism and Post-Modernism (to name but a few) - are particularly well represented in institutions like the Centre Pompidou, the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris and the Musée d’Orsay; but you’ll also find plenty of collections that span pre-medieval times to the 1990s. Contemporary works by established and lesser-known artists are omnipresent too; and almost every museum organises temporary exhibitions that fill in the gaps (momentarily at least) in their permanent collections. Here is our list of suggestions…

Contemporary art in the suburbs
Art

Contemporary art in the suburbs

Those who don't believe that contemporary art (think 'pretentious, highbrow, trendy, urban') and the suburbs ('rough, dodgy, uncultured, rude') could ever go hand in hand should pop over to the other side of the périphérique from time to time. In the last 20-odd years, between the narrow belt covered by the underground and the oh-so-distant terminuses of the RER lines, contemporary arts centres and galleries have been cropping up all over the place, each bolder and better than the last. Artists' residences, shiny new exhibition spaces, restored historical monuments: here, between concrete and countryside, is where you'll find all the region's best contemporary art.

Art deco Paris
Art

Art deco Paris

After the First World War, architecture in Paris (like in other great cities across the world) turned away from the asymmetrical, sinuous forms of art nouveau, (made famous in Paris by architects like Hector Guimard, who designed the iconic Métro entrances) to embrace the angular, modernist and often symmetrical forms of cubism and neoclassicism. This aesthetic transformation reflected the nation's desire (during the Roaring Twenties and 1930s) to embrace modernity and leave behind the hardship of the Great War. In Paris, it left the city with some true architectural gems, from art deco palaces at the Trocadéro to modernist constructions by Le Corbusier and stunning municipal swimming pools. Even a handful of parks and gardens were landscaped according to art deco aesthetics.

Secret galleries in Paris
Art

Secret galleries in Paris

You could fit all six of these venues inside one wing of the Louvre; yet together they represent a vast cross-section of the capital’s alternative art scenes, ranging from street art to anonymous photography. It’s no coincidence that many of them are situated in squats or beyond the périph – in a city where space is at a premium and rent is through the roof, the suburbs and abandoned public buildings are often the only option for penurious artists. The result is that few people make it to these places, drawn instead to the massive marketing campaigns of the Musée d’Orsay or the Centre Pompidou. With this list, we hope to correct that. Read on to discover our six favourite galleries and museums overlooked by the crowds. To discover more offbeat gems, including parks, restaurants and bars, visit our Secret Paris page.

Open-air museums
Museums

Open-air museums

Don't miss out on a (rare) sunny day in Paris because you're inside a museum. Still need to get your art fix? Just head to one of our picks of the best open-air museums in the capital for a dose of fresh air AND culture.

Art deco museums
Museums

Art deco museums

Art and design boomed in 1920s and 30s Paris, as the gracious curves of art nouveau (popular from the Belle Époque to World War I) made way for the rectilinear elegance of art deco. In post-war France, the style reflected the country's desire to promote its industrial and artistic savoir-faire – consolidating design and technology in new ways, and with new materials. The five museums listed below pay homage to the movement with rich collections of art deco art, artefacts and furniture – from sumptuous period rooms in the Musée des Arts Décoratifs to neoclassical 1930s sculpture in the Musée Belmondo. If you're really into the style, book a guided tour at the Musée des Années 30, which takes you around art deco buildings in Boulogne-Bilancourt before showing you the museum's collections.

Modern & contemporary art museums
Museums

Modern & contemporary art museums

Art galleries aren’t the only places to display cutting-edge art and photography these days: the city’s museums – big and small – offer some startling collections. From hard-hitting photography exhibitions at the Jeu de Paume, to offbeat multi-media installations at the Gaïté Lyrique, and modern art masterpieces at the Centre Pompidou, prepared to be wowed…

The Centre Pompidou

The Centre Pompidou

The primary colours, exposed pipes and air ducts make the Centre Pompidou one of the best-known sights in Paris. The then-unknown Italo-British architectural duo of Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers won the competition with their 'inside-out' boilerhouse approach, which put air-conditioning, pipes, lifts and the escalators on the outside, leaving an adaptable space within. The multi-disciplinary concept of modern art museum (the most important in Europe), library, exhibition and performance spaces, and repertory cinema was also revolutionary.When the centre opened in 1977, its success exceeded all expectations. After a two-year revamp, the centre reopened in 2000 with an enlarged museum, renewed performance spaces, vista-rich Georges restaurant and a mission to get back to the stimulating interdisciplinary mix of old. Entrance to the forum is free (as is the library, which has a separate entrance), but you now have to pay to go up the escalators.The Centre Pompidou (or 'Beaubourg') holds the largest collection of modern art in Europe, rivalled only in its breadth and quality by MoMA in New York. Sample the contents of its vaults (50,000 works of art by 5,000 artists) on the website, as only a fraction - about 600 works - can be seen for real at any one time. There is a partial rehang each year.For the main collection, buy tickets on the ground floor and take the escalators to level four for post-1960s art. Level five spans 1905 to 1960. There are four temporary exhibition spaces

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Music and nightlife

Outdoor gigs and concerts
Music

Outdoor gigs and concerts

Gigging doesn't have to be about half-lit back rooms in pubs. Clubbing doesn't have to entail a steady drip-drip of sweat on your crown. Classical concerts aren't confined to the forbidding environs of your local cathedral or cultural centre. Come summer, musicians head outdoors like everybody else, and the city's terraces and parks blossom into makeshift concert venues. Whether you're looking to soak up some mellow hip-hop with your sunrays or you're after a full-on boat party, we have the place for you. So don your shades, clear out your earwax and get down.

Classical music concerts in Paris
Music

Classical music concerts in Paris

Catholic chants under Charlemagne, Gabriel Fauré's 'Requiem' premiered at La Madeleine, Olivier Messiaen playing birdsong on the organ of the Sainte-Trinité... France boasts one of the great classical music traditions in the world, and Paris has witnessed some of its most magical moments. Today, the classical music scene thrives in the form of scores of concerts and venues, running the gamut from sacred choral music in Medieval churches to contemporary performances in cutting-edge media centres. Read on for our guide to the best classical and opera to be found in the city.

Music at La Villette
Music

Music at La Villette

An enormous, modernist cultural theme park and gardens, one of the best things about Parc de La Villette is its varied music programme, courtesy of several differnent venues. Lovers of rock, pop, classical music and DJ nights are all catered for through an exciting series of line-ups – always worth checking out when planning your diary.For the full programme of events at Parc de la Villette, click here.

Alternative clubbing
Clubs

Alternative clubbing

Avoid mainstream club nights at these cutting edge venues 

The 100 best shops in Paris – Record stores
Shopping

The 100 best shops in Paris – Record stores

Lay into some vinyl at these record shops

Jazz clubs and bars
Bars and pubs

Jazz clubs and bars

In the city that owned the jazz age, it would be rude not to 

Alternative music venues
Music

Alternative music venues

Unique spaces to catch gigs in Paris 

Roaring Twenties entertainment
Music

Roaring Twenties entertainment

In the Roaring Twenties, Paris was jazz hot, glamorous and fashionable; and making merry in clubs and bars was the name of the game. This was the era that saw performers Joséphine Baker, Maurice Chevalier and Mistinguett shoot to stardom. For the first time in history automobiles drove people to picture houses, women danced the Charleston in revealing flapper dresses, and life (now that the ashes of World War I had settled) seemed to brim with new opportunity. Of course, the Wall Street crash and the Great Depression soon put a stop to that; but the legacy of the Années Folles lives today on in theatres and jazz clubs across central Paris. Here are our suggestions for a glamorous night out – Joséphine Baker style – with or without your banana belt.

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Shopping

Valentine’s shopping in Paris
Shopping

Valentine’s shopping in Paris

Underwear for her • Alice Cadolle Five generations of lingerie-makers are behind this gorgeous boutique, founded by Hermine Cadolle, who claimed to be the inventor of the bra. Great-great-granddaughter Poupie Cadolle continues the tradition in a cosy space devoted to a luxury ready-to-wear line of bras, panties and corsets. Lace, feathers and leopard print abound... Quirky knick-knacks • Les Fleurs There are two reasons to walk down passage Josset in the 12th: it’s quaint and off the beaten track; and it’s home to Les Fleurs, a girly boutique extraordinaire that drips with funky jewellery, bags, rococo mirrors and all sorts of gizmos and gadgets for little and grown up girls alike.  Owner Lucie Deniset has handpicked little-known, yet well-respected designers... Bespoke for the boys • Eglé Bespoke Two young entrepreneurs are reviving bespoke for a new generation in this tiny shop. Custom shirts start from €119 and can be delivered in a week or so; they will also make or copy shirts for women and produce made-to-order jeans for both sexes. Laser-printed buttons are perfect for stamping your beloved's shirt with a saucy message... Behind closed doors • Passage du Désir Founded in 2006, Passage du Désir is a veritable 'lovestore' – a place in which to free your kinky fantasies far from the cries of seedy sex shops. From willy shaped pasta to edible body paint, vibrators and an array of his and hers sex toys (including a dildo that plugs into your i-pod and vibrates to the rhythm

Gourmet Christmas shopping
Shopping

Gourmet Christmas shopping

Gluttonous gourmands, this one's for you. Extraordinary volumes of well-fed turkeys, luxurious foie gras and fresh oysters are shifted through the French capital during the Christmas season, as no well-dressed festive table will be seen without them. Ferret out yours at these top-quality purveyors... Salmon Des saumons et des ailes Head to Des Saumons et des Ailes for a glut of festive treats that are available all year round, like organic smoked wild salmon from Denmark, Norway, Scotland and the last traditional smoker in France (Maison Barthouil). The fish are sliced on site for extra freshness, priced between €90 and €220 per kilo... Un Saumon à Paris No fewer than nine types of salmon are available at Un Saumon à Paris, four of them wild: Scottish, Norwegian, Danish, Irish, from the Adour river in France or marinated in dill, whole or sliced. The fish are given a long smoking in the traditional style over alder wood, a method refined by the Maison Berthouil... Foie gras Krisco Specialising in local French produce, Krisco is full of excellent high-quality vinegars, sweets and charcuterie – but the real draw is the foie gras. A stone’s throw from the Buttes Chaumont park, the deli also has a lovely set picnic menus in summer: a choice of sandwiches, bread, charcuterie, cheese, drinks and apples for one, two, three or four people, perfect for snacking while lounging... L'Epicerie du Père Claude Père Claude’s three businesses are just a few steps away from each other: the

Paris' hottest shopping area
Shopping

Paris' hottest shopping area

Everyone knows that designer labels pepper the streets around avenue Montaigne and Saint-Germain-des-Près, but where can you find today’s most exciting emerging French designers?  There are a handful of up-and-coming labels along rue Keller and rue de Charonne in the 11th; but for a full blown shopping jaunt amid fresh designer boutiques coveted by in-the-know fashionistas, you can’t beat the rue Charlot area in the Haut Marais (3rd).  In this predominantly 17th-century part of town, discreet facades reveal next-generation French labels, hidden vintage boutiques and jewellery makers – the lot interspersed with avant-garde art galleries and cool cafés. This also where you’ll find the Marché des Enfants Rouge (38 rue de Bretagne 75003. Closed Mon) – a luscious food market selling everything from fresh sashimi and Caribbean curries to organic crêpes. START: At the northern end of rue Charlot your spending opportunities begin at N° 60 (Tue-Sat 10am-7pm), where you can pick up edgy fashion by a mix of Parisian and International brands. Designers to look out for here include Lou de Beauregard who does a lovely semi-transparent take of the little black dress; and U-NI-TY for elegant men’s waistcoats and casual jackets. Across the road, at N°55, créateurs Yves Andrieux & Vincent Jalbert (Mon-Sat 10am-1pm, 2pm-7pm) use recycled army fabrics, bold vintage material and antique embroideries to create satchels, cushion covers and clothes quite unlike anywhere else in Paris. While next-doo

Shopping on the Champs-Elysées
Shopping

Shopping on the Champs-Elysées

In 1969, hoary French crooner Joe Dassin released 'Les Champs-Elysées', a perfect piece of cheesy French chanson with the lyrics 'in the sunshine, in the rain, in the dark or in the day, all you need's on the Champs-Elysées'. The song captured the role of the avenue at the time as one of the most fashionable and eclectic streets in Paris. But during the '90s the 'Champs' lost its magic, becoming smothered in offices, car showrooms, overpriced eateries, run-of-the-mill shops and fume-pumping traffic jams. Novelty megastores FNAC and Virgin failed to overcome its new déclassé status, leaving the formerly glamorous avenue to the mercy of tourists and businessmen.Since 2011, however, things have been looking up. The congestion, the tourists, the showrooms and the daylight robbery restaurants are all still there, of course. But several mainstream fashion brands – Banana Republic, Levi's, Hugo Boss, Abercrombie & Fitch and even Marks & Spencer's – have chosen to locate exciting new flagship stores on the Champs, luring Parisians back to their long-neglected capital of consumer chic. More than just high street shops, these brands are promising unique shopping experiences: cutting-edge art installations at Levi's, daytime clubbing at Abercrombie & Fitch or free personalised shopping at Banana Republic. So now that the Champs-Elysées are calling fashionable Parisian shoppers back again, we've put together a guide to help you stay ahead of the curve... Five recommended Champs-Elysées s

City guide

Paris in 48 hours
Things to do

Paris in 48 hours

Just two days to take in the most beautiful city in the world? We've got you covered Day 1 • From Marais Mansions to Midnight Munchies 9AM Start the day on the Right Bank with an awesome croissant from the hugely popular Moisan, an easy stroll from beautiful 17th-century Place des Vosges. The Marais is abuzz with culture, shops, bars and, in its imposing hôtels particuliers, important cultural institutions: take your pick from the Musée Carnavalet, Musée d'Art et d'Histoire du Judaïsme or the Maison Européenne de la Photographie. Shoppers, meanwhile, will find rich pickings in the streets leading off the main shopping thoroughfare of Rue des Francs-Bourgeois. NOON From the Marais, head across the Seine via the Pont de Sully to the Institut du Monde Arabe, which holds a fine collection of Middle Eastern art and a rooftop café with fabulous views down the Seine. (Other wonderful panoramas in Paris include the summit of the Parc des Buttes-Chaumont and the Sacré-Coeur, although the latter is worth saving for dusk.) After a wander along the Left Bank to lunch in the back room at La Palette, a classic café, meander along the stone quays that border the Seine and leaf through tatty paperbacks at the riverside bouquinistes, before ducking into the Musée d'Orsay for an Impressionist masterclass. 4PM From here, either hop on a boat tour or explore the islands. Snag an ice-cream from Berthillon on the Ile St-Louis, before popping over to the Ile de la Cité to visit the Mémorial des Mar

101 things to do in Paris: attractions
Museums

101 things to do in Paris: attractions

Looking for attractions in Paris? Scroll through the list below for the very best diversions the capital has to offer. Think we've missed any great attractions in Paris? Let us know and leave a comment in the box below.

Paris in 48 hours
Things to do

Paris in 48 hours

Few cities can compare with the cultural attractions, world-class restaurants and restless nightlife that Paris has to offer. But with just two days in the city, it can be tricky figuring out where to start to take in the absolute best. So we’ve pulled together the definitive guide to getting the most out of Paris in 48 hours. Read on for an itinerary and list of things to do in the capital put together by Time Out’s expert writers and editors. 

Discover Paris on foot
Things to do

Discover Paris on foot

One of the best ways to see a city is on foot; even better, let a local show you around. The guides at Discover Walks will show you Paris for nothing more than tips, a brilliant opportunity to get intimate with the city.The (English language) walks run every day except for 24 and 25 December, and there are several themes to choose from: Paris landmarks, Montmartre, the Marais, Notre Dame and the heart of Paris, the Left Bank, and a romantic evening river walk. For a fee, they can also arrange private tours and selected 'Paris Adventures', including a spell at a flea market and a boat cruise, games of boules and photo workshops.

The best books about Paris
Things to do

The best books about Paris

Sometimes, Paris seems to be a city built for readers – a magical place where no one looks out of place alone at a café with a paperback. The go-to destination for writers, artists and radical philosophers for centuries, the city is fiercely proud of its literary leanings. Notre-Dame and Victor Hugo are spoken of in the same breath, as are Hemingway and the Jardins du Luxembourg, and people can barely see a madeleine without referring to Proust. The smells from restaurant kitchens or the plight of the city's homeless invite discussion of Orwell, while the swinging shut of the iron gate to an elegant apartment building might recall Muriel Barbery.All this can make the city resistant to change – the e-book market in France is minuscule, and Amazon's discounts are restricted to protect independent bookstores. But it all adds to the often dreamlike quality of browsing, buying and enjoying books in Paris, where paper and ink still speak of art, romance and possibility. The Paris buffs interviewed here know this only too well – and be they books for cooks or babies, you'll find plenty of inspiration in their selections.Do you have a favourite Paris read? Let us know in the comments box below.

Cheap Paris
Things to do

Cheap Paris

Enjoy the best of what Paris has to offer without breaking the bank 

Christmas in Paris • Day trips
Things to do

Christmas in Paris • Day trips

Suffering from festive metropolitan overload? We feel you. Fortunately, a quick day trip out of the city can help you de-Grinch without too much fuss. Forget heading all the way to Strasbourg for the giant Christmas market. Rent a car or hop on a train to one of the Ile de France's most festive Christmas locations, all just an hour or so away. Castles, a glass of bubbly, and of course a little bit of Mickey await...

Roaring Twenties Paris
Things to do

Roaring Twenties Paris

After the austerity and bloodshed of World War I, France longed for joy and light-heartedness. Pre-war values were rejected as people embraced new lifestyles and new technologies, and discovered a lust for extravagance and partying that had the era named Les Années Folles (the Roaring Twenties, or the 'mad years'). Cars appeared on the roads; picture houses opened, projecting the world's first silent movies; radios appeared in households; jazz flourished, and musical halls – where icons like Josephine Baker and Maurice Chevalier launched their careers – became the places to see and be seen in.Paris was at the heart of it all, not only in terms of fashion and entertainment, but in the domains of decorative art and architecture, as movers and thinkers drew inspiration from cubism, modernism and neoclassicism to create the 'total' style we know and love today: art deco (the term coined thanks to Paris's 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes). Such was the impact of this 'modern style' that it carried on well into the 1930s.Artists and writers also flourished during the era – especially if you knew American expat, art collector and mentor Gertrude Stein, who opened her house (at 27 rue de Fleurus) to the 'Lost Generation' of American literati (including Hemingway and Fitzgerald), and artists like Picasso and Matisse. So huge was the impact these personalities would have on the world that many Left Bank cafés (where the legends hung out when no

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