Book Talk: The Making Of Asian America

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Book Talk: The Making Of Asian America
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Book Talk: The Making Of Asian America says
Organized in partnership with the World Affairs Council of Oregon

During the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States. But as award-winning historian Erika Lee reminds us, Asian Americans also have deep roots in the country. An epic history of global journeys and new beginnings, The Making of Asian America shows how generations of Asian immigrants and their American-born descendants have made and remade Asian American life in the United States: sailors who came on the first trans-Pacific ships in the 1500s; indentured "coolies" who worked alongside African slaves in the Caribbean; and Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, and South Asian immigrants who were recruited to work in the United States only to face massive racial discrimination, Asian exclusion laws, and for Japanese Americans, incarceration during World War II. Over the past fifty years, a new Asian America has emerged out of community activism and the arrival of new immigrants and refugees. No longer a "despised minority," Asian Americans are now held up as America's "model minorities" in ways that reveal the complicated role that race still plays in the United States.

Erika Lee is an award-winning American historian, Director of the Immigration History Research Center, and the Rudolph J. Vecoli Chair in Immigration History at the University of Minnesota. Her scholarly specialties include migration, race and ethnicity; Asian Americans; transnational U.S. history; and immigration law and public policy. Her newest book, The Making of Asian America: A History was published by Simon & Schuster in September, 2015. She is also the author or co-author of the award winning books Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America , (with Judy Yung, Oxford University Press, 2010) and At America's Gates: Chinese Immigration During the Exclusion Era, 1882-1943 (University of North Carolina Press, 2003) as well as many articles on immigration law and Asian American immigration. She has been awarded numerous national and university fellowships and awards for her research, teaching, and leadership. She is an active public scholar and has been an invited speaker at universities, historical societies, and community organizations around the U.S. and internationally.

Free & open to the public
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By: Oregon Historical Society

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