Your ultimate guide to Singapore

Discover the best Singapore events, things to do, restaurants, music, film, art, theatre, nightlife and more...

Cycling routes in Singapore: Kallang
Things to do

Cycling routes in Singapore: Kallang

Bring a camera along when you take this green-swathed route through parks and temples.

Al fresco dining in Singapore
Restaurants

Al fresco dining in Singapore

Make the most of our warm climes when you head out to these al fresco restaurants

Facials to try in Singapore
Health and beauty

Facials to try in Singapore

We unmask the best facials in town to tackle all your skin problems

Cycling routes in Singapore: Hillview
Things to do

Cycling routes in Singapore: Hillview

You’d be surprised by the number of nature parks and quarries on the Western Adventure Loop

We tried McDonald’s latest creation, the nasi lemak burger. Here’s our verdict
Blog

We tried McDonald’s latest creation, the nasi lemak burger. Here’s our verdict

With all the hype surrounding McDonald’s newest addition to its menu, we just had to try it.  While this isn’t the first time the fast food chain has served locally inspired flavours (remember the rendang beef, and salted egg yolk burgers?), McDonald’s has decided to recreate one of Singapore’s most iconic dishes – nasi lemak. And the burger ($5.95/à la carte; $7.80/meal) comes with all the trimmings: served between semolina buns, there’s a juicy fried chicken patty, fried egg, cucumber slices, caramelised onions, and the sweet and spicy sambal sauce. The only thing missing was the ikan bilis, but we guess we’ll let it slide.   Hands down, our favourite parts of the burger were the chicken and fried egg – they taste just like the ones you'd get from the hawker stalls. However we got too little sambal and the bread was too dry for our liking. Overall, the burger's pretty decent but we'll stick to the real deal for now.  We also upgraded our meal for a side of criss cut fries ($3.40) and bandung McFizz ($3), and tried the coconut pie ($1.20). You definitely can't go wrong with the deep-fried potatoes but the latter two didn't quite leave an impression. From left to right: chendol McFlurry, chendol Melaka twist, kueh salat cake and pandan coco frappe  Sadly, we didn’t get to taste the rest of the dessert menu, including the kueh salat-inspired cake ($5), pandan coco frappe ($4.60), chendol Melaka cones ($1.20/each) and chendol McFlurry ($3). But, we’ll save our stomachs

What's on in Singapore this week

Pesta Raya 2017
Theatre

Pesta Raya 2017

Pesta Raya returns to celebrate the rich heritage and beauty of Malay traditional and contemporary arts. Anticipate musical performances from new and old artists including a dikir barat battle, Malaysian rock icon, Ella, and Indonesia's rising indie-alternative band, Payang Teduh. Learn more about the Malay archipelago at the screening of Setan Jawa, which features the visual imagery of Javanese mythology, and accompanied by a live gamelan and Western orchestra. 

Ignite! Music Festival
Music

Ignite! Music Festival

The annual student-run festival features a whole slew of local performers. Back for its tenth edition, Ignite celebrates the best of homegrown bands, bringing in both established and up-and-coming local acts. This year's main festival (Jul 28 & 29) line-up includes ShiGGa Shay, THELIONCITYBOY, LEW, Jasmine Sokko and more. 

Kueh Pairing Workshops
Things to do

Kueh Pairing Workshops

On July 15, 22 and 23, Rainbow Lapis is holding three kueh pairing workshops as part of Singapore Food Festival 2017. Pair your heritage kuehs with artisan teas ($80), bespoke cocktails ($98) or speciality coffees ($80), and expect to learn the fundamentals of pairing principles during the three-course kueh and beverage tasting session. On top of learning to appreciate culture, you'll also get to make a mod-Sin Kueh and craft a drink at the workshops. 

Japan Food Town's First Anniversary
Restaurants

Japan Food Town's First Anniversary

Japanese food lovers, take advantage of Japan Food Town's one-for-one promotion at a different restaurant each week as part of its first anniversary celebrations. Highlights include a maguro cutting event on July 16, and a social competition that gives you a chance to win a set of $1,000 vouchers. For health-conscious foodies, opt for the healthier choice Japanese rice that can be found in more than half of the participating tenants. 

So Singapore at Sentosa
Things to do

So Singapore at Sentosa

Get intimate with everything Singaporean at Sentosa's So Singapore, where a slew of family friendly activities wait for you. Go back in time at the Heritage Carnival (Aug 4 to 13) and mingle with roving characters from the pre-war days or munch on local treats such as chendol, and Peranakan kueh. Come on Saturdays and you'll be treated to a performance arts like a wushu performance, Peranakan folk songs, and bian lian, a form of traditional Chinese opera. As night falls, get ready to whip your phones out – the Sentosa's Merlion lights up with an array of colours and visual effects, accompanied by music. 

Singapore Food Festival 2017
Things to do

Singapore Food Festival 2017

Immerse yourself in the local food scene at this year's Singapore Food Festival (SFF). Start from STREAT, SFF’s signature event and work your way through various workshops and events such as Ion Orchard’s Chocolate Wonderland (Jul 14-16), kueh pairing workshops, and The 50 Cents Fest where you’ll get to try hawker dishes for – you got it – 50 cents. Additionally, indulge in traditional hawker fare paired with artisanal wines hosted by Merchant Wine Store. For a relaxing time, tuck into a curated picnic basket on the lawn while enjoying a local food film under the stars at Open Farm Community. 

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New restaurants and bars in SG

Bistro November
Restaurants

Bistro November

You'll have to hurry if you want a taste of chef JP Fiechtner's creative cuisine at Bistro November. As its name suggests, the pop-up restaurant is only calling its spot at Hotel 1929 home 'til November. The menu changes daily, depending on what the kitchen team finds at Chinatown market in the morning, but rest assured that you're always guaranteed something appetising. The sharing menu is priced at $78 per person and when we were there, we were served cured mackerel with fennel, lardo and bonito cream, a chamomile-brined mutton tartare chopped with foie gras, and braised lamb tongue with roselle vinegar among many other treats. But if that sounds like too much (or adventurous) for you, Bistro November also has à la carte dishes available during both lunch and dinner.

Audace
Restaurants

Audace

Cooking with audacity comes easy to chef Jérémy Gillon – he led the team at L'Epicurien in Val Thorens, a part of the French Alps, to a Michelin star and is now trading the snow for sunny Singapore. Part of the Unlisted Collection group of restaurants, Audace takes a lighter approach to French bistro fare, peppering dishes with herbs plucked, dried, and shipped in from The Alps. Try the steamed Mediterranean seabream ($26), which is served with salted lemon paste for a shot of acidity, or the beef striploin ($29) with banana shallot papillote and tarragon coulis – both stars on the restaurant's menus, which are presented as crushed paper balls. 

Catchfly
Bars and pubs

Catchfly

Climb down the stairs from Coriander Leaf Grill and open the discreet black door to a snazzy New-York style bar – Catchfly. Light reflects from the gold bars decorating the exposed brick wall and the same thread of gold runs through the floorboard, creating a runway to the bar through a sea of plush teal armchairs. Once you've sashayed to the counter, order a craft cocktail from head mixologist, Liam Baer. His specialities include The Honey Badger, made with house-infused rosemary bourbon, yellow chartreuse, lemon, ginger and honey, and Salad Days, a culinary twist on a cocktail. It's made using tomatoes that have been sous vide in gin for two hours, and this mixture is shaken with Gentian liquor and Bianco Vermouth before it's finished with a light dose of pink peppercorn and smoked olive oil.  

Misato
Restaurants

Misato

For affordably priced Japanese comfort food in the heart of town, look no further than Misato. Its seafood kaminabe set is priced at $20.80 and comes loaded with fresh tiger prawns, salmon, chicken, mushrooms and vegetables in a homemade niboshi broth. Other specialities include okonomiyaki ($14.90) made with Japanese yams and cabbage, and the beautifully plated cha soba ($13.80).

Muse Amuse
Restaurants

Muse Amuse

This two-in-one concept by The Carbon Collective serves Asian-inspired small plates at Muse – which boasts counter seats by its open kitchen where you can watch as chefs whip up dishes such as Uni Pie Tee ($15), homemade kueh pie tee topped with sea urchin, and Tartaro ($18), a hand-chopped wagyu steak tartare tossed with sesame oil, Korean honey pears, chilli and a raw egg yolk. Walk through the glass doors and you'll find yourself at Amuse – a private bar that shakes up potent cocktails like its Tom Yum Bloody Mary ($25) and Mango Sticky Rice ($25), a rum-based cocktail served with a side of freshly cut mango.

Coriander Leaf Grill
Restaurants

Coriander Leaf Grill

Meats kissed by the flames of a charcoal grill are the order of the day at Coriander Leaf Grill. The restaurant is one of a few concepts at 12 Ann Siang, a five-storey shophouse that's also home to Catchfly, an intimate New York-style bar at the basement, and The Screening Room that also has a rooftop bar. The menu is kept simple, focusing on grilled meats marinated with a touch of Asian flair. There's dry-aged USDA prime ribeye steak ($39) with wakame-koji butter, a harissa chicken burger ($20) crowned with pickled onions served between two buttery brioche buns, and sides like charred broccoli tossed with lemon, chilli and garlic.

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Latest restaurant reviews

Summerlong
Restaurants

Summerlong

Mediterranean-leaning small plates joint from the folks behind Neon Pigeon

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
Amò
Restaurants

Amò

Handmade pizzas and pastas in a casual space

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
The Dempsey Cookhouse and Bar
Restaurants

The Dempsey Cookhouse and Bar

Affordable European cuisine by a celebrity chef

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
The Masses
Restaurants

The Masses

Bang-for-your-buck plates

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
See more restaurant reviews

Area guides

Telok Ayer
Things to do

Telok Ayer

Telok Ayer may have taken its name from the Malay community (it translates to ‘bay’ and ‘water’, respectively), but the area was mainly populated by Chinese immigrants back in the day. Originally a coastal road situated along the island’s old waterfront, the street has transformed itself into a buzzing lifestyle district, teeming with restaurants and bars to feed the CBD office crowd. Pay a visit to one of the museums around the area or pop into the lean shophouses that dot the strip, where boutiques, gyms and a dance studio are tucked away. RECOMMENDED: Check out our guide to the Ann Siang Hill area

Amoy Street
Things to do

Amoy Street

Anyone who tells you Amoy Street is 'boring' has clearly never stepped foot down the lane before. Because trust us, it's the complete opposite of that. Previously known for its opium-smoking dens during the British colonial era, the shophouses lined along this one-way street now house chic cafés, bars and even gyms. But if you'd like to have a taste of Singaporean flavour, hit up the hawker centre in the area that's always buzzing with people. RECOMMENDED: Check out our guide to the Ann Siang Hill area

Gemmill Lane
Things to do

Gemmill Lane

The small stretch between Club Street and Amoy Street – whose namesake is 19th-century banker John Gemmill – is home to a handful of stylish restaurants and bars, making it the perfect spot for a laid-back hangout. Don't stop at the end of the road either, the back alley of Amoy Street has a few hidden restaurants to wind down at for an after-work dinner and drinks sesh. RECOMMENDED: Check out our guide to the Ann Siang Hill area

Ann Siang Road and Club Street
Things to do

Ann Siang Road and Club Street

Named after Chia Ann Siang, a wealthy businessman, Ann Siang road is home to restored shophouses (some are still decorated with Peranakan tiles) that house clan associations, restaurants, bars and niche boutiques. There’s also a hidden green space behind the row of shophouses for a quiet stroll. On Friday and Saturday nights from 7pm to 1am, both Ann Siang Road and Club Street – the name comes from the Chinese clubs that used to line the stretch – come to life as the area is closed off to traffic and the crowd spills out onto the streets. RECOMMENDED: Check out our guide to the Ann Siang Hill area

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