Jigsaw

Film, Horror
2 out of 5 stars
Jigsaw

Time Out says

2 out of 5 stars

We're back for more mechanised gore in the boring return of a franchise that no one was missing that much

The first Saw took heat for launching the 'torture porn' trend, but taken on its own terms, it was a cleverly nasty bit of business with a whopper of a surprise ending. While director James Wan went on to the more refined pastures of the Insidious and Conjuring franchises, the Saw sequels increasingly curdled into nastiness and convoluted plotting as tortured as their victims. Seven years after the series hit its appalling nadir with 2010’s Saw 3D: The Final Chapter, it’s been…revived. 'Rebooted' would suggest variations on a theme; Jigsaw instead slavishly repeats the past films’ formula.

Once again, a motley group of captives is run through an obstacle course of death traps designed to moralistically punish them for past sins. (Though brutal, none of the new tests enter the Saw hall of fame for creativity.) These ordeals are intercut with assorted law-enforcement types and forensic scientists puzzling over mutilated corpses and other clues, trying to get to the bottom of the mystery. Given that evil mastermind Jigsaw (Tobin Bell) supposedly died ten years ago, the big questions are: Has he returned from the dead? If so, how? And if not, who has taken up his ghoulish mantle?

Unanswered, as always, is how the villain set up these industrial-scale death chambers without attracting attention, and how he (or she?) knows so much about the victims’ dark secrets. It all leads to a Big Climactic Reveal, and the one sprung by co-scripters Josh Stolberg and Pete Goldfinger (who were responsible for one of cinema’s most idiotic plot twists in Shark Night 3D) may strike some viewers as a colossal cheat. In any case, what we learn here ignores and contradicts quite a bit of the previously established Saw mythology.

The directing Spierig Brothers – who, like Wan, hail from Australia, and previously helmed the more interesting Daybreakers and Predestination – keep Jigsaw moving briskly enough and don’t wallow in mean-spiritedness in the manner of some previous entries. But neither are they able to rally much rooting interest in these bland characters, or to achieve the bottom-line goal of any horror film: despite its meticulously detailed gore, Jigsaw is rarely scary.

By: Michael Gingold

Posted:

Details

Release details

Rated:
MA15+
Release date:
Thursday November 2 2017
Duration:
92 mins

Cast and crew

Director:
Michael Spierig, Peter Spierig
Screenwriter:
Josh Stolberg, Pete Goldfinger
Cast:
Matt Passmore
Tobin Bell
Callum Keith Rennie

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