A Special Day

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

If American audiences could buy the films of Lina Wertmüller wholesale, it's hardly surprising that A Special Day, a more restrained but equally spurious piece of Italo-attitudinising on sex and politics, pulled two Oscar nominations. It looks 'serious': newsreels set the scene as the day of Hitler's visit to Rome in May 1938; the colour is bleached to an approximation of sepia; Loren eschews make-up. It sounds 'meaningful': Mastroianni mouths philosophy down the phone; the radio blares Fascist agit-prop. It boils down, however, to the worst kind of sentimental tosh, as Loren's dowdy housewife sets aside her dreams of the Duce for a day and embarks on a brief encounter with Mastroianni's hounded homosexual from across the courtyard. And its supposed 'achievement' is to present this unlikely coupling as a revolt against their mutual oppression, itself 'explained' by Fascism. QED: rubbish.
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Release details

UK release:

1977

Duration:

105 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

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Thank you, Nic, for offering a succinct counterpoint to the unbelievably insensitive critic review. This was my first exposure to Scola and I can't wait to see more after viewing this beautifully composed film (even after seeing it in a horribly transferred, cropped and dubbed rendition!). The apparent simplicity that does not let your attention idle as it moves the story flawlessly through sound as much as sight, foregrounds a deeply honest exploration of oh so human convictions and feelings that can make us both strong and vulnerable, public and private. Marvelously refreshing.

dash

Thank you, Nic, for offering a succinct counterpoint to the unbelievably insensitive critic review. This was my first exposure to Scola and I can't wait to see more after viewing this beautifully composed film (even after seeing it in a horribly transferred, cropped and dubbed rendition!). The apparent simplicity that does not let your attention idle as it moves the story flawlessly through sound as much as sight, foregrounds a deeply honest exploration of oh so human convictions and feelings that can make us both strong and vulnerable, public and private. Marvelously refreshing.