Albert Nobbs (15)

Film

Drama

Albert Nobbs

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>2</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
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Time Out says

Tue Apr 24 2012

Ah, cross-dressing. The glitz, the glamour, the saucy hilarity. Well, according to ‘Albert Nobbs’, such larks are a fairly recent invention. In nineteenth-century Ireland, frolics were noticeably hard to come by, and fun was only for the wealthy. And for a woman of meagre means, dressing up like a man might be the only way to earn a crust.

It’s taken three decades for actress and co-writer Glenn Close to bring this pet project to cinemas – she first played the title character in the theatre in 1982, and it’s been a rocky road from stage to screen. It’s not hard to see why: this resolutely downbeat story, which follows gender-bending butler Albert in her faltering attempts to navigate the world of Dublin polite society without being discovered, is hardly a crowd pleaser.

Close and her co-author novelist John Banville attempt to satisfy the ‘Downton’ crowd with a spot of upstairs-downstairs shenanigans and some doomed teen romance between boozy hired hand Aaron Johnson and starry-eyed maid Mia Wasikowska. But the focus is firmly on Albert and her suffering – and although temporary reprieve arrives in the form of fellow draggist Hubert (British actress Janet McTeer), such happiness is inevitably fleeting.

Close and McTeer richly deserved their Oscar acting nods, and the film is steeped in facinating period detail – but there’s precious little to enjoy. The grim, grey-hued result is about as far from contemporary drag chic as it’s possible to get – appropriate for the subject matter, perhaps, but hardly the stuff of satisfying cinema.
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Release details

Rated:

15

UK release:

Fri Apr 27, 2012

Duration:

113 mins

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

3.8 / 5

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LiveReviews|8
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Alexis

I felt weirdly disturbed all through this film and yet it has stuck in my head days after. I think Janet McTeer should have played Albert Nobbs and Glenn Close Hubert Page. I could almost see the maid being oddly drawn to McTeer but Close just looked liked someone no matter how much " the whiff of money " he possessed, you would cross the street to avoid. And here is the oddest thing. I'll probably watch it again. Glenn Close made a repulsive little man whereas Janet McTeer was almost sexy....I think...I told you it was disturbing!

Alexis

I felt weirdly disturbed all through this film and yet it has stuck in my head days after. I think Janet McTeer should have played Albert Nobbs and Glenn Close Hubert Page. I could almost see the maid being oddly drawn to McTeer but Close just looked liked someone no matter how much " the whiff of money " he possessed, you would cross the street to avoid. And here is the oddest thing. I'll probably watch it again. Glenn Close made a repulsive little man whereas Janet McTeer was almost sexy....I think...I told you it was disturbing!

MikeT

Unusually, as I’d heard nothing of Albert Nobbs elsewhere, I read Tom Huddleston’s Time Out review. Personally, I think it’s a little off-putting. . I’d agree that Albert Nobbs isn’t an uplifting film but, put in context, neither are Glenn Close’s other well-known Oscar nominated roles: Marquise de Merteuil in Dangerous Liaisons; and Alex Forrest in Fatal Attraction. Clearly, Glenn Close is very good at dark roles. . I thought Albert Nobbs was a tale very well told. I was so caught up in the story several times I found myself gripping the jumper on my lap: there’s a great innocence in Albert’s character, which Close plays very well – and it’s clear Albert’s likely to get taken advantage of. It’s a well cast movie – in fact, extremely well cast, and flawlessly acted. The attention to detail is excellent: – set, costume, street scenes, etc. . Conclusion: Glenn Close deserved her Oscar nomination for this, though I still think it was right Meryl Streep won the Oscar for her role in the Iron Lady. Albert Nobbs is well worth seeing. Three stars. (Scrumpjack, I don’t think you’ll like this. Archgate, you might like this.) . (I'm posting under the name of MikeT, as another "mike" recently started posting.)

MikeT

Unusually, as I’d heard nothing of Albert Nobbs elsewhere, I read Tom Huddleston’s Time Out review. Personally, I think it’s a little off-putting. . I’d agree that Albert Nobbs isn’t an uplifting film but, put in context, neither are Glenn Close’s other well-known Oscar nominated roles: Marquise de Merteuil in Dangerous Liaisons; and Alex Forrest in Fatal Attraction. Clearly, Glenn Close is very good at dark roles. . I thought Albert Nobbs was a tale very well told. I was so caught up in the story several times I found myself gripping the jumper on my lap: there’s a great innocence in Albert’s character, which Close plays very well – and it’s clear Albert’s likely to get taken advantage of. It’s a well cast movie – in fact, extremely well cast, and flawlessly acted. The attention to detail is excellent: – set, costume, street scenes, etc. . Conclusion: Glenn Close deserved her Oscar nomination for this, though I still think it was right Meryl Streep won the Oscar for her role in the Iron Lady. Albert Nobbs is well worth seeing. Three stars. (Scrumpjack, I don’t think you’ll like this. Archgate, you might like this.) . (I'm posting under the name of MikeT, as another "mike" recently started posting.)

Rita

I really enjoyed this film, which was peopled with thought-provoking characters I cared about, and a weird premise that was also convincing.

Rita

I really enjoyed this film, which was peopled with thought-provoking characters I cared about, and a weird premise that was also convincing.

nick

perhaps its time Time Out got a new reviewer. First I see The Cabin in the woods which he gave 5 stars and which most of your readers seem to agree that it is a crass 14 year old pleaser at best worthy of two stars. Now he lays into this fascinating and touching piece, superbly acted and gorgeously shot. Entirely satisfying cinema and yes, thank god as far from contemporary drag chic as possible. See it and take no notice of the inept review above.

nick

perhaps its time Time Out got a new reviewer. First I see The Cabin in the woods which he gave 5 stars and which most of your readers seem to agree that it is a crass 14 year old pleaser at best worthy of two stars. Now he lays into this fascinating and touching piece, superbly acted and gorgeously shot. Entirely satisfying cinema and yes, thank god as far from contemporary drag chic as possible. See it and take no notice of the inept review above.