Alps (15)

Film

Drama

Aggeliki Papoulia, right, in Alps

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
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Time Out says

Wed Nov 7 2012

In a gymnasium, a handful of odd people calling themselves ‘Alps’ hangs out, connected by a fixation with the mundane details of the lives of people at death’s door – including a promising teenage tennis player in intensive care. Weird hobby? Exploitative enterprise? Search for identity? Greek filmmaker Giorgos Lanthimos might be best suited to a form that doesn’t really exist: the cinematic novella. Both 2009’s ‘Dogtooth’, about a perversely insulated nuclear family, and this follow-up have much to recommend them. They cultivate queasy suspense from banalities and unfurl with a dry-as-dust deadpan absurdism that covers a multitude of sins. They have a powerful feeling for the ways in which social and linguistic structures underwrite arbitrary but binding – even reassuring – power games. And they have a juggling, discombobulating way with intimate deceptions, sudden violence and nuggets of Hollywood fandom. Lanthimos’s films have the quality of latter-day fables and would grip and tantalise over 40 or 50 minutes. At twice that length, their obscene obliqueness must either wear thin or coagulate disappointingly into conventional narrative. Less might be more.
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Release details

Rated:

15

UK release:

Fri Nov 9, 2012

Duration:

91 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

Yorgos Lanthimos

Screenwriter:

Yorgos Lanthimos

Cast:

Aggeliki Papoulia, Ariane Labed

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

3.8 / 5

Rating Breakdown

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  • 3 star:1
  • 2 star:0
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Ben

For the first half hour of this film I wondered if I needed new glasses, the picture looked so dark and dim. The flat lighting was a deliberate effect, but you'll need to stay alert if you're going to enjoy this one. Aggeliki Papoulia's performance as a woman obsessed with taking on the identities of dead people drives the whole film, but as a whole this film only really gets going halfway through.

Fiercehairdo

Quite disappointed in this 3 star review, Alps is actually much better than Mr Jenkins suggests. Lanthimos pulls off the conjuring trick of making Alps simultaneously moving and tender, whilst also being hilariously, darkly comic, yet also oddly unnerving. The film is beautifully shot with odd framing and depth of field used to emphasise the characters skewed and blurred view on reality. The film proceeds at a slow, deliberate pace but is still mesmerising throughout. Very little explanation is supplied leaving plenty of space for interpretation and speculation about the ambiguous events on screen. A really beautiful piece of work.

Fiercehairdo

Quite disappointed in this 3 star review, Alps is actually much better than Mr Jenkins suggests. Lanthimos pulls off the conjuring trick of making Alps simultaneously moving and tender, whilst also being hilariously, darkly comic, yet also oddly unnerving. The film is beautifully shot with odd framing and depth of field used to emphasise the characters skewed and blurred view on reality. The film proceeds at a slow, deliberate pace but is still mesmerising throughout. Very little explanation is supplied leaving plenty of space for interpretation and speculation about the ambiguous events on screen. A really beautiful piece of work.