Away We Go

Film

Comedy

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Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>2</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5
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Time Out says

Tue Sep 15 2009

Sam Mendes began shooting ‘Away We Go’ while the editing suite was still warm from ‘Revolutionary Road’. You can imagine why, after that gruelling anatomy of a failed marriage, he was drawn to the story of a happy and well-adjusted, if under-prepared, couple on the threshold of family life. Let’s hope it was more fun to make, anyway, because it’s pretty insufferable to watch.

The script, by husband and wife Dave Eggers and Vendela Vida, follows semi-slacker thirtysomethings Burt (John Krasinski) and Verona (Maya Rudolph) as they search for the perfect site to raise their unborn child, zipping from Arizona to Wisconsin, Colorado to Carolina. Along the way, they encounter relatives and old friends including Burt’s hippy-dippy parents (Jeff Daniels and Catherine O’Hara) and neo-feminist childhood pal (Maggie Gyllenhaal), Verona’s braying former colleague (Allison Janney) and two old buddies (Chris Messina and Melanie Lynskey) and their adopted kids.

Krasinski and Rudolph are amiable company and there’s some nice scenic photography from Ellen Kuras (shot mostly in Connecticut). But the film’s laboured humour and self-satisfaction grate, as does its twee indie-acoustic soundtrack. That every supporting character is depicted as insufferable or pitiable or both would be bad enough; what’s worse is that the couple discover nothing about themselves that wasn’t obvious from the opening, unless you count the banal dictum that there’s no place like home. A screenplay that jokes about the lack of tension between its leads should at least have something to say about their interaction with the rest of the world. This doesn’t.
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Release details

UK release:

Fri Sep 18, 2009

Duration:

98 mins

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

3.4 / 5

Rating Breakdown

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  • 4 star:2
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:1
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|8
1 person listening
chris

Ben Walters is so on the ball here. Two people who have obviously never met in their lives before, who know nothing whatsoever about each other, and who have all the interpersonal chemistry of two house bricks embark on a tedious and ultimately pointless road trip to the accompaniment of an insufferable Nick Drake impersonation "Indie" soundtrack. So what. Life is too short for movies as bad as this.

jonathan

just seen this film on dvd and thank goodness I didn't read the time out review before hand as it would have put me off. The only thing Ben Walters review has taught me for future reference is to not take any notice of Time Out film reviews - it's a great film, with a good soundtrack, very funny and very touching. I'm 38, have a young daughter and work in insurance - exactly what qualifications thee days do you need to write a fair film review for Time Out - Ben, I'm sure you're a decent man but please, please loosen up and learn to enjoy this kind of film a bit more, it's a real gem!

Floyd

Yes, the reviewer gets it. Awful film. These characters kid at being adults, but they're vapid and dull. Which is, I suppose, the point. A better screenplay (perhaps with this base material) would certainly help.

Yannis

Cannot believe what i am reading. I totally disagree with Ben Walters. Away We Go is one of the best films i've seen lately and i have seen almost everything... Realistic characters, powerful dialogue and majestic directing made me feel so good after seeing the film. People can relate themselves to the story something that is rare nowadys in mainstream cinema. Well done, Sam Mendes!

Yannis

Cannot believe what i am reading. I totally disagree with Ben Walters. Away We Go is one of the best films i've seen lately and i have seen almost everything... Realistic characters, powerful dialogue and majestic directing made me feel so good after seeing the film. People can relate themselves to the story something that is rare nowadys in mainstream cinema. Well done, Sam Mendes!

lucy sheridan

This was an absolutely harmless and enjoyable film about the pressures and fears of modern parenthood. How Time Out can justify this level of spite in a review is a mystery to me especially as it has elected to reward the revolting and utterly pointless remake of 'The Firm' three stars!

Michael

Ben Walters is spot-on. The humour is heavy-handed; the main characters dull; the story a series of random encounters that go nowhere and mean nothing; and such weak and juvenile attempts at satire that you have to groan. It could have been a great film, because the hysteria that pervades American life all over the continent deserves a biting satire, and American parenthood would be a good place to start, but this film fails miserably.