Babylon

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

Although Babylon shows what it's like to be young, black and working class in Britain, the final product turns dramatised documentary into a breathless helter-skelter. Rather than force the social and political issues, Rosso lets them emerge and gather momentum through the everyday experience of his central character Blue (sensitively played by Forde). A series of increasingly provocative incidents finally polarise Blue and lead to uncompromising confrontation. Although the script runs out of steam by the end, the sharp use of location, the meticulous detailing of black culture, the uniformly excellent performances and stimulating soundtrack command attention.
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Release details

UK release:

1980

Duration:

95 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

Franco Rosso

Cast:

Brian Bovell, Trevor Laird, Karl Howman, Brinsley Forde, Victor Romero Evans

Music:

Dennis Bovell

Art Director:

Brian Savegar

Editor:

Thomas Schwalm

Cinematography:

Chris Menges

Screenwriter:

Franco Rosso, Martin Stellman

Producer:

Gavrik Losey

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Average User Rating

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Graham Silbiger

Babylon is the best snapshot of underground London subculture. Made in 1980 the year before the Brixton riot. It shines a light on the tensions that blew up only a short while later and acurately portrays sound system culture. With a superb soundtrack its gritty portrayal of life in Thatchers Britain is usurpassed. It clearly shows the subculture that was at the heart of Londons underground black music scene during the 70s and in to the 80s. See it and wish you had been born earlier!

Graham Silbiger

Babylon is the best snapshot of underground London subculture. Made in 1980 the year before the Brixton riot. It shines a light on the tensions that blew up only a short while later and acurately portrays sound system culture. With a superb soundtrack its gritty portrayal of life in Thatchers Britain is usurpassed. It clearly shows the subculture that was at the heart of Londons underground black music scene during the 70s and in to the 80s. See it and wish you had been born earlier!