Ferris Bueller's Day Off

Film

Comedy

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5
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Time Out says

Ferris (Broderick) is a boy who gets anything he wants, screws over anyone who gets in his way, and gets patted on the back for doing so. Gathering his best friend (Ruck) and his best girlfriend (Sara), he skips school for the day out in Chicago. Hughes revels in Ferris' ingenuity, then neatly adds dimension after a ninety-minute parade of hubris and material wealth by telling us that people count more than their possessions. Ferris is an admittedly entertaining, at times delightful fellow. How unfortunate that no one got to wring the little bastard's neck.
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Release details

UK release:

1986

Duration:

103 mins

Cast and crew

Cast:

Jeffrey Jones, Alan Ruck, Mia Sara, Cindy Pickett, Matthew Broderick, Jennifer Grey

Director:

John Hughes

Music:

Ira Newborn

Cinematography:

Tak Fujimoto

Editor:

Paul Hirsch

Screenwriter:

John Hughes

Producer:

Tom Jacobson, John Hughes

Production Designer:

John W Corso

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

3.1 / 5

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LiveReviews|7
1 person listening
Alec

I personally think many of you are missing the point this is a stylish comedy which you are supposed to sit down relax and watch you are not supposed to be wowed at a complex and deep plotline you are supposed to sit dawn and enjoy the truly hilarious scenes one by one it is one of my favourite films of all time and the music is incredibly catchy OH YEAH!

Alec

I personally think many of you are missing the point this is a stylish comedy which you are supposed to sit down relax and watch you are not supposed to be wowed at a complex and deep plotline you are supposed to sit dawn and enjoy the truly hilarious scenes one by one it is one of my favourite films of all time and the music is incredibly catchy OH YEAH!

Travis

I gotta agree with Mikey. I actually watched this movie as a child and felt the same way about it THEN. My teen sister and her friends thought it was great and I realized I thought less of them for actually liking Ferris.

Smatt

Ferris Bueller's Day Off is a sort of modern-day fairy tale in which, as several of the previous reviewers observed, everything works out. It is light comedy but meticulously executed and one of the finest cult movies from the 80s. In spite of the title, Ferris is not the center of the movie. He is a catalyst for change to the people in his life, namely his sister and friends, but it takes the entire film to understand his worldview, succinctly put at the beginning and end of the movie: "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't look around once in a while, you could miss it." Put another way: Carpe diem. This message seems to be lost on some of my fellow reviewers. Go out. Have fun. Don't let obstacles hold you back. Even though Ferris is a total punk to some people, the message is real. The movie is admittedly simple. It's a sort of On the Road for the 80s generation, a random quest around the city that doesn't have a true plot. Frankly, it's a welcome diversion from movies that bully you around with their plot points, forcing you without much reflection through the different scenes. Ferris Bueller's Day Off meanders and gets lost in the simplicity of youth, but it doesn't lose any focus of spirit. Through comedy, adventure, and love, the film supports knowing yourself, being comfortable in your own skin, and of course, having fun. What, you're still here? Go home! Go! Go have some fun of your own. After all, fun doesn't belong to Ferris.

Smatt

Ferris Bueller's Day Off is a sort of modern-day fairy tale in which, as several of the previous reviewers observed, everything works out. It is light comedy but meticulously executed and one of the finest cult movies from the 80s. In spite of the title, Ferris is not the center of the movie. He is a catalyst for change to the people in his life, namely his sister and friends, but it takes the entire film to understand his worldview, succinctly put at the beginning and end of the movie: "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't look around once in a while, you could miss it." Put another way: Carpe diem. This message seems to be lost on some of my fellow reviewers. Go out. Have fun. Don't let obstacles hold you back. Even though Ferris is a total punk to some people, the message is real. The movie is admittedly simple. It's a sort of On the Road for the 80s generation, a random quest around the city that doesn't have a true plot. Frankly, it's a welcome diversion from movies that bully you around with their plot points, forcing you without much reflection through the different scenes. Ferris Bueller's Day Off meanders and gets lost in the simplicity of youth, but it doesn't lose any focus of spirit. Through comedy, adventure, and love, the film supports knowing yourself, being comfortable in your own skin, and of course, having fun. What, you're still here? Go home! Go! Go have some fun of your own. After all, fun doesn't belong to Ferris.

Karin C

I actually agree with Mikey G. I quite enjoyed the movie, but I think it how Ferris got away from everything quite ridiculous. It was kinda funny though

Mikey G

It's a quiet Saturday night, and I've just finished watching "Ferris Bueller's Day Off". Frankly, it was a bizarre experience. I know that teen tastes are more changeable than most with the passage of time, but "Ferris" just left me completely nonplussed. It isn't tragic or funny. There's precious little plot (boy, best friend and girlfriend take the day off school and muck about, teacher tries to catch them but fails, and that's literally it) and the characterization is non-existent (Ferris is lucky - which is a circumstance, not a character trait - his friend is uptight, and his sister's angry at his good fortune, and that's literally it). The acting is particularly abysmal - especially from Mia Sara, who plays Ferris's girlfriend. She delivers her lines deadpan and stares vaguely into the middle distance throughout - she could be contemplating love, homework, the possibility of interplanetary space travel or haemmorhoids for all we know. Weirdest of all is the complete lack of any moral compass or message - Ferris, who has rich parents and friends, stands for absolutely nothing apart from "taking it easy"; he's not even rebelling against anything. All he does is skip school, go to a museum, have lunch in a fancy restaurant, lounge around in a hot tub and sing a couple of karaoke numbers at a parade, then get back in time for tea. He doesn't drink, smoke or do drugs, and he fully intends to graduate and go to college. His actions have no consequences (and we're not shown what becomes of his hapless friend who has trashed his dad's priceless Ferrari) - but more importantly, they don't seem to have any purpose either; nothing is achieved, none of the characters learn anything. And the message is supposed to be "par-taaay", then frankly I think I'd have more fun at a meeting of our local traffic management planning committee. Am I missing something deep,or is it just completely vapid?