Full of Life

Film

Comedy

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
Rate this
 

Time Out says

Breezy comedy, with gargantuan Baccaloni (a popular New York opera singer of the '50s) pissing off Italian-American couple Holliday and Conte by interfering in the birth of their child. Holliday has no special religious convictions but her boozy father-in-law-to-be insists she confirm her faith before the sprog is born. Holliday is vivacity itself; Baccaloni is a roly-poly firecracker; and the script by cult author John Fante (from his own novel) strikes just the right note.
0

Reviews

Add +

Release details

UK release:

1956

Duration:

91 mins

Users say

0
<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:1
  • 4 star:0
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|2
1 person listening
Todd Solley

I first saw "Full of Life" on late night television when I was only 13 years old. My usual Saturday night fare was along the lines of "Frankenstein's Daughter" or, when I was very lucky "Invasion of the Body Snatchers." I miss the days of only having 5 channels and being subject to the whims of a big city programmer. So, it really wasn't my choice to see, and ultimately lose a piece of my heart to a charming film about family, tradition and love. I never had a family of my own, so the nostalgia I feel for this warm, funny comedy-drama is mixed with regret for what might have been. Judy Holliday and Richard Conte perfectly embody the type couple I aspired to be one half of. This film is less contrived than most of its contemporaries, and this is due in large part to the direction of the vastly underrated Richard Quine. His body of work in the late fifties is as rich and deserving of serious study as Nicholas Ray. To see "Full of Life" today is to be transported to a time that seems gentler and more promising and leaves the viewer richly rewarded.

Todd Solley

I first saw "Full of Life" on late night television when I was only 13 years old. My usual Saturday night fare was along the lines of "Frankenstein's Daughter" or, when I was very lucky "Invasion of the Body Snatchers." I miss the days of only having 5 channels and being subject to the whims of a big city programmer. So, it really wasn't my choice to see, and ultimately lose a piece of my heart to a charming film about family, tradition and love. I never had a family of my own, so the nostalgia I feel for this warm, funny comedy-drama is mixed with regret for what might have been. Judy Holliday and Richard Conte perfectly embody the type couple I aspired to be one half of. This film is less contrived than most of its contemporaries, and this is due in large part to the direction of the vastly underrated Richard Quine. His body of work in the late fifties is as rich and deserving of serious study as Nicholas Ray. To see "Full of Life" today is to be transported to a time that seems gentler and more promising and leaves the viewer richly rewarded.