Loch Ness

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

Expect wall to wall effects, and you'll be disappointed. Here's a jaunty family fable where the power of legend and imagination, and the affection for people and place vanquish all-comers. Rarer than a sighting of Nessie is, of course, a sparkling movie performance from Danson, but that's what we get, self-deprecating and sympathetic as the has-been LA zoologist sent to disprove the existence of the mythic beastie once and for all. The witty script sticks to the formula in confronting him with Richardson's no-nonsense lochside innkeeper (to supply the romance) and her lively daughter (Graham, agreeably unprecocious). No, it's not original, but with terrific support from wax-jacketed water bailiff Holm, bright eyed expedition helper Frain, some perfectly judged shock moments from John Henderson (directing his first features after the children's TV series The Borrowers), and a lush, classy, folk-tinged score from Trevor Jones, it's a compact winner that hits the bull's eye in almost every department.
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Release details

UK release:

1994

Duration:

101 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

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James

Nicely done, worth watching over and over to catch all the nuances and repartee, with Kirsty Graham (Isabel) stealing the acting honours: she's so cute! Ian Holm is superb as the water bailiff, especially when he realises the Loch's secret won't be revealed. Ted Danson (Cheers!) and Joely Richardson start off worlds apart, but find mutual attraction. James Frain convincingly provides the enthusiasm as well as incredulity. The monster effects are low key, and the film is all the better for that. A 'feel-good' film, and one of my favourites...

James

Nicely done, worth watching over and over to catch all the nuances and repartee, with Kirsty Graham (Isabel) stealing the acting honours: she's so cute! Ian Holm is superb as the water bailiff, especially when he realises the Loch's secret won't be revealed. Ted Danson (Cheers!) and Joely Richardson start off worlds apart, but find mutual attraction. James Frain convincingly provides the enthusiasm as well as incredulity. The monster effects are low key, and the film is all the better for that. A 'feel-good' film, and one of my favourites...