London Belongs To Me

A shabby London lodging-house has the usual assortment of oddballs, including Alastair Sim - that staple of eccentricity - as a phony medium. Most particularly, there is garage-hand Attenborough, who lives with his mum (Henson). For a while, the picture looks like out-takes from This Happy Breed, but it swerves into thrillerdom, and then into something else again when Attenborough steals a car and his former girlfriend is killed in a hit-and-run accident. Attenborough is sentenced to hang for murder, and his fellow-lodgers march to Whitehall demanding a reprieve. Gilliat handles the thematic lurching very ably, even if it does look like a filmed play, and Attenborough's performance uses the left-over menace and panic of Brighton Rock. (From a novel by Norman Collins.) ATu.

Release details

Duration: 112 mins

Cast and crew

Director: Sidney Gilliat
Screenwriter: Sidney Gilliat, JB Williams
Cast: Alastair Sim
Stephen Murray
Richard Attenborough
Fay Compton
Wylie Watson
Susan Shaw
Joyce Carey
Hugh Griffith
Gladys Henson

Average User Rating

3.8 / 5

Rating Breakdown

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Jeff Laffel

A delightful film with yet another wonderful performance by Alistair Sim, but for grand scope it can't touch the novel on which it was based. The book, by Norman Collins, written in 1945, is Dickensian in style and can be called a lower middle class version of GRAND HOTEL with the inhabitants of a rooming house interacting as the backbone of England in the late 1930's. See the movie, yes, but find an old copy of the book and get set to lose yourself in it.

Jeff Laffel

A delightful film with yet another wonderful performance by Alistair Sim, but for grand scope it can't touch the novel on which it was based. The book, by Norman Collins, written in 1945, is Dickensian in style and can be called a lower middle class version of GRAND HOTEL with the inhabitants of a rooming house interacting as the backbone of England in the late 1930's. See the movie, yes, but find an old copy of the book and get set to lose yourself in it.