Mammoth (15)

Film

Drama

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Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>2</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
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Time Out says

Tue Nov 2 2010

Sometimes it feels like Lukas Moodysson wants to punish us for our warm reaction to his early films, ‘Show Me Love’ and ‘Together’. ‘Lilya 4-Ever’ was a harrowing portrait of sex trafficking and child rape and ‘A Hole in the Heart’ an academic, all but unwatchable mash-up of home-porn and surgery. Where could he go next? In ‘Mammoth’, his first sort-of-mainstream, English-language film, he wraps a blunt, anti-globalisation message clunkily into a family drama that unravels between New York and South East Asia.

Gael Garcia Bernal and Michelle Williams play a young married couple and are limited by some terrible dialogue. As good NY liberals, they say please and thank you to their Philippine nanny (Marife Necesito), managing to remember the name of her kids in the Philippines. They know the cost of everything and the value of nothing is the implication, and it is the world’s poor who are paying the price. He is a gamer who flies to the Far East, where his website is being sold to a Thai conglomerate, and where his family’s story overlaps with their nanny’s. An interesting idea, but ‘Mammoth’s good intentions – like its characters’ – are lost somewhere in the delivery.
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Release details

Rated:

15

UK release:

Fri Nov 5, 2010

Duration:

125 mins

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

3.8 / 5

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LiveReviews|3
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PETER  barna

a HEART-WARMING FILM. tHE aMERICAN AND bRITISH CRTICS HAVE, ALAS, FORGOTTEN WHAT TRUE FAMILY FEELINGS ARE AND TRUE DECENCY IS. I FEEL THEY ALL HAVE TO SETTLE A FORGOTTEN SCORE WITH A DIRECTOR. THEY THINK IF THEY CAN ATTACH A LABEL "ANTI-GLOBALIZATION" "BABELESQUE' THEY HAVE DONE THEIR DUTY AND NOT REVIEW WHAT THEY HAVE IN FRONT OF THEIR FACE.. ALL THE PEOPLE IN THE FILM BEHAVED AS ADULTS; PERHAPS THAT'S WHAT IS ALIEN TO THESE REVIEWERS. NO WONDER PEOPLE DESPISE JOURNALISTS.. THE SWEDISH DIRECTOR IS HEAD AND SHOULDERS ABOVE THESE PUNY REVIEWERS. ALL THE CHARACTERS HAVE THEIR FRAILTIES, MISTAKES, BUT THEY ARE LIVING BEINGS WHO LIVE AS THEIR SOCIETY LETS THEM. A FINE MOVIE.

PETER  barna

a HEART-WARMING FILM. tHE aMERICAN AND bRITISH CRTICS HAVE, ALAS, FORGOTTEN WHAT TRUE FAMILY FEELINGS ARE AND TRUE DECENCY IS. I FEEL THEY ALL HAVE TO SETTLE A FORGOTTEN SCORE WITH A DIRECTOR. THEY THINK IF THEY CAN ATTACH A LABEL "ANTI-GLOBALIZATION" "BABELESQUE' THEY HAVE DONE THEIR DUTY AND NOT REVIEW WHAT THEY HAVE IN FRONT OF THEIR FACE.. ALL THE PEOPLE IN THE FILM BEHAVED AS ADULTS; PERHAPS THAT'S WHAT IS ALIEN TO THESE REVIEWERS. NO WONDER PEOPLE DESPISE JOURNALISTS.. THE SWEDISH DIRECTOR IS HEAD AND SHOULDERS ABOVE THESE PUNY REVIEWERS. ALL THE CHARACTERS HAVE THEIR FRAILTIES, MISTAKES, BUT THEY ARE LIVING BEINGS WHO LIVE AS THEIR SOCIETY LETS THEM. A FINE MOVIE.

Phil Ince

I had a different feeling from the reviewer and felt that a really interesting film was in the making here but that the script lost its way about 45 minutes in. It seemed to me that the film was partly looking at the impact of work on family life and at the role of adults in children’s lives. Globalisation may have been an element in the mix of its considerations but it didn’t seem central. The whole film could have been set within the borders of any one country in the world and still found similar issues to illustrate the difficulties of migrant workers and their families and employers. Where it really came a cropper was somewhere before the halfway mark when it began to depict the maid as a 'villain'. The maid is seen as appropriating the American mother's child and doesn't defer to the mother as a parent at crucial moments. The maid then abandons the child at the end. An implication is that the custodians of children care about them for private reasons but that they're irrelevant ultimately in comparison to their own. That’s fair comment but what’s depicted is disappointingly unbalanced and prominent in comparison to some more subtle points. I'd like to have seen something more comprehensively critical and comprehensively compassionate to all of the parents in the film but it does make some interesting observations on modern human interdependence and vulnerability.