Revolver (15)

Film

Gangster films

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Time Out says

Tue Sep 20 2005

Oh dear. The press-notes for Guy Ritchie’s long-awaited follow-up to the never-released fiasco that was ‘Swept Away’ (UK box office: nul points!) helpfully explain that Ritchie was ‘the first student in the UK to get a GCSE in film studies’. I’ll leave you to invent a suitable punchline to that particular joke and cut straight to the chase: ‘Revolver’ is a humourless, leaden and incoherent car-crash of a movie. Worst of all, it’s a car-crash with a disturbing sense of its own self-importance. Guy Ritchie as artist-philosopher? I don’t think so, matey.Here, Ritchie revisits the gangster milieu of ‘Lock, Stock…’ and ‘Snatch’ but ditches the easy-going cartoon-drama of those earlier films in favour of what he clearly considers to be higher art. Why else employ ponderous choral and piano music, a fractured and indecipherable narrative, countless unsuccessful aphorisms and pretentious flash-quotes from the likes of Julius Caesar and Machiavelli to tell the simple story of Jack Green (Jason Statham), an inscrutable villain who steps out of jail and is straightaway caught up in a complex stand-off with perma-tanned casino boss Dorothy Macha (Ray Liotta)? The behaviour of Green’s Mephistophelean sidekicks Zach (Vincent Pastore) and Avi (André Benjamin) further complicate the drama. To be honest, I barely understood the plot; Ritchie’s core method is to confuse.The roll-call of Ritchie’s crimes is extensive: disorientating use of flashback; overuse of voiceover; cheap use of crucifixion imagery… Where are the laughs (by God, it needs them)? Where are the ideas? Ritchie trades here on narrative obstruction and sixth-form clever-cleverness (chess is a recurring theme). During a Q&A session at the Toronto Film Festival last week, Ritchie told an audience who had just watched the film that it was probably worth viewing a few times to understand it properly. I can’t think of a pastime more likely to turn you off cinema for good.
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Release details

Rated:

15

UK release:

Thu Sep 22, 2005

Duration:

115 mins

Cast and crew

Cast:

Jason Statham, Vincent Pastore, Ray Liotta, André Benjamin

Editor:

James Herbert, Ian Differ, Romesh Aluwihare

Cinematography:

Tim Maurice-Jones

Music:

Nathaniel Mechaly, Marco Beltrami

Producer:

Virginie Silla

Screenwriter:

Guy Ritchie

Director:

Guy Ritchie

Production Designer:

Eve Stewart

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Average User Rating

5 / 5

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LiveReviews|7
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jorpip

Despite having flaws that may unravel the mystery behind the movie for some viewers, the idea behind the storyline was unique and intelligent. Ignore the other negative comments and watch the movie for yourself. Those who find this movie to be simple missed the beauty of it's accomplishments, and therefore have revealed that they are the simple ones.

jorpip

Despite having flaws that may unravel the mystery behind the movie for some viewers, the idea behind the storyline was unique and intelligent. Ignore the other negative comments and watch the movie for yourself. Those who find this movie to be simple missed the beauty of it's accomplishments, and therefore have revealed that they are the simple ones.

J

Guy Ritchie's Revolver is not a film you can not hope to grasp in a single viewing. He deals with the complex concepts of ego and self all revolving around psychological con-games set in his usual stylish criminal underworld. If you think you have the smarts to try and understand the theories Ritchie and his supporting staff of psychologists propose, give Revolver a try.

J

Guy Ritchie's Revolver is not a film you can not hope to grasp in a single viewing. He deals with the complex concepts of ego and self all revolving around psychological con-games set in his usual stylish criminal underworld. If you think you have the smarts to try and understand the theories Ritchie and his supporting staff of psychologists propose, give Revolver a try.

John Doe

Nope. The critic got it right: Pretentious, recycled garbage. Sorry, Mr. Ritchie, but the "surprise" was about as obvious as your casting choices.

anonymous

personally i thought this was fantastic. it took a couple of viewings to fully understand, but i was only delighted to have an excuse to watch it again and again. Sorter in particular was a very cool character. i enjoyed it a lot, and it kept me thinking. overall, a very good crime thriller

anonymous

personally i thought this was fantastic. it took a couple of viewings to fully understand, but i was only delighted to have an excuse to watch it again and again. Sorter in particular was a very cool character. i enjoyed it a lot, and it kept me thinking. overall, a very good crime thriller