Sammy and Rosie Get Laid

Film

Comedy drama

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

A genial, retired Indian political torturer (Kapoor) returns to England to visit son Sammy (Dim) and daughter-in-law Rosie (Barber) in war-torn Ladbroke Grove. Family explanations are conducted in the thick of riots, the first of many preposterous juxtapositions. Sammy accommodates his father because he wants his money; social worker (yawn) Rosie is less of a pushover, wanting political commitment and sexual freedom, ie. to have her cock and eat it. So does this film, tossed together from a Hanif Kureishi screenplay which labours so many right-on themes that none leave their mark. Black Danny (Gift) smiles enigmatically in a woman's hat ('Call me Victoria'), symbolising some seraphic quality or other; hectoring lesbians swap het-hating slogans; a peace commune beneath the Westway is bulldozed to the strains of patriotic music; and in one of the worst sequences in this oratorio of half-baked agitprop, the screen splits into three layers to show six people fucking at once, serenaded by close-harmony Rastas. Finally, in a last-ditch attempt at dramatic structure, the retired torturer, hounded by the grotty ghost of one of his victims, strings himself up. My Beautiful Laundrette it is not.
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Release details

UK release:

1987

Duration:

101 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

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joel Greenberg

"Sammy and Rosie..." is badly served by the review posted on this site - it is a masterpiece that addresses a time that no other film I know has taken on with such passion, ferocity and humour. Compare it to "The iron Lady", an ineptitude of staggering proportions, and the Kureishi/Frears film, terribly underrated and relegated to some archival hell, desreves attention and certainly a DVD or blu-ray transfer.

joel Greenberg

"Sammy and Rosie..." is badly served by the review posted on this site - it is a masterpiece that addresses a time that no other film I know has taken on with such passion, ferocity and humour. Compare it to "The iron Lady", an ineptitude of staggering proportions, and the Kureishi/Frears film, terribly underrated and relegated to some archival hell, desreves attention and certainly a DVD or blu-ray transfer.