Tea with Mussolini

Film

Not yet rated

Be the first...

 

Time Out says

Franco Zeffirelli's autobiographical WWII Tuscan drama is edged with (uncharacteristic) irony and artistic reserve, turning what is essentially an old-fashioned, faintly twee exercise in nostalgia into an amusing historical entertainment. The master of Chianti-shire manners, John Mortimer has co-scripted, and it feels as much his film as Zeffirelli's. Mortimer details the pretensions, rivalries and snobberies of the so-called Florentine scorpione among whom the film's young hero, the bastard Luca, is fostered; and it's this colony of dotty, politically inert, artistically bent British ex-pats, either taking tea in the Uffizi or talking art in Doney's café, and variously oblivious, contemptuous or supportive of the fascists, which holds centre stage. They're played with ease by a roll call of theatrical dames. The rest is a gently teasing tribute to wartime British pluck (read: muddling through) and American 'can-do', lit like a lost summer by David Watkin.

Users say

0
<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:1
  • 4 star:0
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|2
1 person listening
anne judd

I just LOVE this film-SO British-but the scenery/sets are to die for!!!Even Cher's good.One of my favourite movies of all time.Maggie Smith is her usual autocratic self but Judi Dench is just wonderful!

anne judd

I just LOVE this film-SO British-but the scenery/sets are to die for!!!Even Cher's good.One of my favourite movies of all time.Maggie Smith is her usual autocratic self but Judi Dench is just wonderful!