The Boy Mir – Ten Years in Afghanistan (PG)

Film

Documentaries

Mir farming_August 2006.JPG

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

Tue Sep 27 2011

Shocked and saddened by the Taliban’s 2001 destruction of the giant carved Buddhas of Afghanistan’s Bamiyan region, British filmmaker Phil Grabsky travelled to the area in order to make a documentary about the war-ravaged region through the eyes of its people. There he found gregarious cave-dwelling youngster Mir, who became the year-long subject of his 2003 documentary, ‘The Boy Who Plays on the Buddhas of Bamiyan’. Some time later, Grabsky returned for this much more in-depth eight-year portrait of the growing lad and his impoverished family. The politics of war are broached occasionally but mostly the camera sits back and observes as the family’s lives unfold. It’s overlong and not incredibly enlightening, but it’s compassionate enough to hold the attention.
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Release details

Rated:

PG

UK release:

Fri Sep 30, 2011

Duration:

94 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

Phil Grabsky

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

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Laura Gilmour

Go and see this film! This is all at once a moving, insightful, humorous and heart-breaking documentary. The main character, Mir, whose life unfolds before us as we watch him grow from a playful innocent child to a more troubled and reserved 18 year old is instantly engaging. We watch Mir face the same challenges and desires as any other boy his age while, at the same time, struggle to come to terms with the war and what it means to him and his family. Forced to become refugees under the Taliban regime, the film opens to find Mir and his family living in a cave in one of the remotest parts of Afghanistan. Director Phil Grabsky visited the country over a period of ten years to make this film, capturing intimate scenes of the everyday life of this family as it struggles to survive. Set against stunning shots of Afghanistan, this film penetrates the heart of this fractured country revealing the devastating effects of war and a side of it the audience will not have seen before.

Laura Gilmour

Go and see this film! This is all at once a moving, insightful, humorous and heart-breaking documentary. The main character, Mir, whose life unfolds before us as we watch him grow from a playful innocent child to a more troubled and reserved 18 year old is instantly engaging. We watch Mir face the same challenges and desires as any other boy his age while, at the same time, struggle to come to terms with the war and what it means to him and his family. Forced to become refugees under the Taliban regime, the film opens to find Mir and his family living in a cave in one of the remotest parts of Afghanistan. Director Phil Grabsky visited the country over a period of ten years to make this film, capturing intimate scenes of the everyday life of this family as it struggles to survive. Set against stunning shots of Afghanistan, this film penetrates the heart of this fractured country revealing the devastating effects of war and a side of it the audience will not have seen before.