The Caine Mutiny

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
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Time Out says

Having aligned himself with producer Stanley Kramer after naming names during the HUAC witch-hunt trials, Dmytryk opted for ever more turgidly serious subject matter. This, the last and perhaps the best of his films for Kramer, was an adaptation of Herman Wouk's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about the court martial carried out against peacetime naval destroyer officers Francis and Johnson after they have mutinied against Bogart's Captain Queeg, who panics during a storm. Bogie's considerable charisma is visibly weakened by his tired appearance, and the strong cast is never really allowed full rein by Dmytryk, whose abiding concern that fair play be seen to be done, with regard to all the characters' various motivations, makes for a stodgily liberal courtroom drama.
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Release details

UK release:

1954

Duration:

125 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

4.2 / 5

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John Duggan

What a dopey review. It misses completely the point that people in positions of great responsibility don't always get it right. While those who make themselves look good, by seeming to do the right thing, are not always what they appear to be. As in "A Few Good Men" , making a simple moral point does not always do justice to the complexity of the decisions made in real life.

Rob Lawson

The review aptly sums up the film, but Dmytryk can't be held responsible for the sedulously balanced approach in the material – he was directing a script, after all.