The Salt Of Life (PG)

Film

Gianni Di Gregorio in The Salt of Life

Gianni Di Gregorio in The Salt of Life

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
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Time Out says

Tue Aug 9 2011

Sixty-year-old Italian director Gianni di Gregorio had a sleeper hit two years back with his delightful low-budget, upmarket Rome-set chamber piece ‘Mid-August Lunch’.

It was subtitled – oh, horror of horrors! – but you could almost have played it without translation, such was the precision of its observation, and it surprised and encouraged the much-sought-after mature, one-film-a year crowd. His second film is another relaxed but keenly perceptive autumn sonata, made by much the same team – notably dextrous cinematographer Gian Enrico Bianchi. It also features the same two stars: the first is the director himself, playing another hard-pressed character, again called Gianni and again suffering an elderly, rich mother graciously; the second, a lived-in Rome, pictured beautifully and seductively, if almost nonchalantly, in warm late summer.

Plus ça change? Pretty much. The McGuffin is new. In the previous adventure, the old Gianni had to provide a lunch for his mum. In the present one, the new Gianni (a married man, living on the Viale Gloriosa with a hard-working wife, an ever-partying daughter and a dog) makes efforts – pretty minimal – to have a sexual affair.

This isn’t particularly on his own promptings, it must be said, but on the insistence of his sexually satisfied lawyer pal, Alfonso. But, to be explicit, the plot isn’t the point. Neither are the film’s watchwords: carpe diem! It’s more about charm. Di Gregorio, as an actor, has it. And, as a director, too. Wisely, he deals in what he knows – life’s minutiae – and he proves the considerable pleasures of watching them unfold: especially when, as here, they are so wittily observed, humorously understood and keenly felt.
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Release details

Rated:

PG

UK release:

Fri Aug 12, 2011

Duration:

86 mins

Cast and crew

Cast:

Valeria de Franciscis, Gianni di Gregorio

Screenwriter:

Gianni di Gregorio

Cinematography:

Enrico Medioli

Director:

Gianni di Gregorio

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

3.3 / 5

Rating Breakdown

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LiveReviews|4
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Sutton

This is a pleasant enough film, though I thought it dragged a little, even though it only runs for 86 minute.

david glowacki

At last a film which is not about the ubiquitous 30 somethings..A charming ensemble piece about turning 50 and the fight against obscurity and being of some consequence in the world..They are no riveting solo performances but the film has a wonderful glow and soft optimism..He is taken for granted by his 90 year mother,his wife and children yet he takes it all with a smile and his good manners never fail him..His ageing insecurity is compounded by his failings in trapping any younger women..Any film with a hot and sunny Italian streets scape as the backdrop will fill the viewer with a kind of soothing nostalgia..If you liked Cinema Paridiso or ill Postino will love this

mrpuglia

Very witty, charming and another great 'small' film. Wonderfully observed, especially great to see so many lovely female characters. Can't wait for the third in the tryptych. Bella, bella.

mrpuglia

Very witty, charming and another great 'small' film. Wonderfully observed, especially great to see so many lovely female characters. Can't wait for the third in the tryptych. Bella, bella.