Together

Film

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
Rate this
 

Time Out says

If '70s radicalism seems a soft target - and ABBA's 'SOS' on the soundtrack makes the point - yet this movie accomplishes the more difficult task of sending up human foibles while remaining sympathetic to the ideals espoused by these Swedish communards. Moodysson's masterstroke is to capture the point of view of two children, dumped in this curious environment of free love, no TV, pot smoking and washing up rotas when their mum walks out on her abusive husband. An especially cherishable moment is when they take turns playing 'Pinochet'. Funny, affectionate and beautifully judged.
0

Reviews

Add +

Release details

UK release:

2000

Duration:

107 mins

Users say

0
<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

3.8 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:0
  • 4 star:1
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|2
1 person listening
John Cooper

Perceptive, psychologically astute, and poignant, this is a stunningly original film which looks for, and finds the best of human values. From the bizarre beginning when commune members celebrate the death of fascist dictator, Franco, to its heart-warming finale when they achieve a genuine moment of happiness and togetherness in a simple game of football in the garden The technique of using children to highlight the delusions and foibles of the adults works beautifullly, and the film's gentle irony and subtle humour is very effective. The director and the actors get the 70's period just right . . . .with its hapless attempts at sexual and political liberalisation. The grainly, washed-out cinematography works well with the subject matter, and all the performances have just the right degree of naturalism . . . . .`Funny, affectionate and beautifully judged .. ` the Time Out review , like the film itself, gets it `just right`

John Cooper

Perceptive, psychologically astute, and poignant, this is a stunningly original film which looks for, and finds the best of human values. From the bizarre beginning when commune members celebrate the death of fascist dictator, Franco, to its heart-warming finale when they achieve a genuine moment of happiness and togetherness in a simple game of football in the garden The technique of using children to highlight the delusions and foibles of the adults works beautifullly, and the film's gentle irony and subtle humour is very effective. The director and the actors get the 70's period just right . . . .with its hapless attempts at sexual and political liberalisation. The grainly, washed-out cinematography works well with the subject matter, and all the performances have just the right degree of naturalism . . . . .`Funny, affectionate and beautifully judged .. ` the Time Out review , like the film itself, gets it `just right`