A Fantastic Fear of Everything (15)

Film

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>1</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5
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Time Out says

Thu Dec 1 2011

Simon Pegg turns the knockabout mugging up to 11 in this resistible British indie pic whose myriad quirks swiftly become a liability. For much of the time, it’s a solo turn as Pegg’s struggling, super-scuzzy would-be writer finds his subject matter (a history of gruesome Victorian slayings) gradually filling him with creeping paranoia. Getting a meeting with a movie exec is his big break, but can he make it across town…or even manage a trip to the launderette? Granted, it sounds intriguing, but this first feature stands or falls on whether we buy into the protagonist’s fears – and we don’t. Pegg is allowed to play it for broad caricature rather than sympathetic character, while the would-be chilling home-alone horror frissons make little impact, leaving us trapped with a hyperactive nutter who keeps telling us what’s happening on screen, though we can see it perfectly well for ourselves. Exasperation eventually morphs into unrelenting pain, and there’s not a single, solitary laugh to be had.
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Release details

Rated:

15

UK release:

Fri Jun 8, 2012

Duration:

100 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

Chris Hopewell, Crispian Mills

Screenwriter:

Crispian Mills

Cast:

Simon Pegg, Clare Higgins, Amara Karan

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

3.3 / 5

Rating Breakdown

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  • 2 star:0
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LiveReviews|8
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Bethany Pitcher

This is my new favorite film. It's a beautifully obcsure and theraputic insight into the mind. It is written by crazy people, for crazy people and I loved every moment.

Bethany Pitcher

This is my new favorite film. It's a beautifully obcsure and theraputic insight into the mind. It is written by crazy people, for crazy people and I loved every moment.

IanS

Not many gags as such,but great humour of character, filtered through a lens of phobic paranoia. Of course, I'm biased, having suffered from that condition myself - and I can tell you, Simon Pegg got it right. The first half was hard to watch, as I kept saying, 'Yep, that's it, that's how it is.' The laundrette act added a surreal situation to the terror: the sense of paranoid exclusion, the compulsion to act in strange ways because of your obsessions, the feeling that nobody's going to show any empathy at all: you are the outsider. I found it all brilliantly observed and portrayed. And then there's the amateur serial killer who's gone funny but doesn't realise it. Although set in the surreal world of the movie, all these things and people exist in life. I found the film very satisfying, partly because there was a real empathy, i felt, with the character's suffering. The comedic element kept things from getting either patronising, crudely lampooning or stereotyping. From that angle, Pegg did a great job, and must have been exhausted after keeping up the panic for whole film. I found myself caring very much about his character, which is what drives the best films. Perhaps they should give him something more serious to do. A very esoteric movie, certainly, and perhaps those with a more Burtonesque or even Hitchcockian funnybone will give it more stars. Maybe a shorter running time would have helped, but it was a brave move to put such an oddity out there at all, with no help from CGI, caped heroes or mammoth budgets. After all, if you've just left Avengers Assemble, would you want to watch a neurotic little English guy face his inner terrors? If not, why not? That's real courage.

IanS

Not many gags as such,but great humour of character, filtered through a lens of phobic paranoia. Of course, I'm biased, having suffered from that condition myself - and I can tell you, Simon Pegg got it right. The first half was hard to watch, as I kept saying, 'Yep, that's it, that's how it is.' The laundrette act added a surreal situation to the terror: the sense of paranoid exclusion, the compulsion to act in strange ways because of your obsessions, the feeling that nobody's going to show any empathy at all: you are the outsider. I found it all brilliantly observed and portrayed. And then there's the amateur serial killer who's gone funny but doesn't realise it. Although set in the surreal world of the movie, all these things and people exist in life. I found the film very satisfying, partly because there was a real empathy, i felt, with the character's suffering. The comedic element kept things from getting either patronising, crudely lampooning or stereotyping. From that angle, Pegg did a great job, and must have been exhausted after keeping up the panic for whole film. I found myself caring very much about his character, which is what drives the best films. Perhaps they should give him something more serious to do. A very esoteric movie, certainly, and perhaps those with a more Burtonesque or even Hitchcockian funnybone will give it more stars. Maybe a shorter running time would have helped, but it was a brave move to put such an oddity out there at all, with no help from CGI, caped heroes or mammoth budgets. After all, if you've just left Avengers Assemble, would you want to watch a neurotic little English guy face his inner terrors? If not, why not? That's real courage.

ed

Not too bad. At least this proves Simon Pegg can act a) without his buddy Nick Frost b) he's not disappeared to Hollywood to shuffle uncomfortably in Blockbusters like MI4 / Ice Age 3 / Star Trek... It had some orginality but it covers much of the same material as BUNNY & THE BULL... I actually enjoyed the earlier scenes. The later scenes in the Laundry descend into stupidity. I wish there were more "little" comedies coming out of the UK... A 3 for having some guts to experiment... before STREETDANCE 3 comes down the porduction line.

ed

Not too bad. At least this proves Simon Pegg can act a) without his buddy Nick Frost b) he's not disappeared to Hollywood to shuffle uncomfortably in Blockbusters like MI4 / Ice Age 3 / Star Trek... It had some orginality but it covers much of the same material as BUNNY & THE BULL... I actually enjoyed the earlier scenes. The later scenes in the Laundry descend into stupidity. I wish there were more "little" comedies coming out of the UK... A 3 for having some guts to experiment... before STREETDANCE 3 comes down the porduction line.

JayneM

This was excrutiatingly awful. I thought the story was poor & I kept on looking at my watch every few minutes thinking I want this to end. Simon Pegg - what were you thinking?!

JayneM

This was excrutiatingly awful. I thought the story was poor & I kept on looking at my watch every few minutes thinking I want this to end. Simon Pegg - what were you thinking?!