Blueberry (15)

Film

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
Rate this
 

Time Out says

Drugs on film can make for a sorry affair, and Jan Kounen’s first film since 1997’s ‘Dobermann’ contains perhaps the most embarrassing hallucinatory sequence since Jim Morrison stepped into the desert in Oliver Stone’s ‘The Doors’. Here, the medicine is peyote and the sweating victim is Vincent Cassel’s Mike Blueberry, a sheriff in 1870s California with a slight French twang (explained away by a background in New Orleans). The film climaxes with a near-on five-minute explosion of colours and shapes, and the effect – apart from being comical – is something like staring at one of those once popular, computer-generated trippy posters. Sadly, though, a soaring eagle never appears.
Why this dreamy sequence? Kounen’s story is one of revenge and honour in the Wild West: Mike Blueberry must prevent Wallace Blount (Michael Madsen) – who murdered his girlfriend several years earlier – from plundering a stash of gold. Kounen weaves in the Native American experience for a more spiritual angle than most westerns (hence the peyote), but the ultimate effect is chaotic.
0

Reviews

Add +

Release details

Rated:

15

UK release:

2004

Duration:

124 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

Jan Kounen

Cast:

Vincent Cassel, Juliette Lewis, Michael Madsen

Users say

0
<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:2
  • 4 star:0
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|5
1 person listening
Stephen

The "critic" did not get this movie AT ALL. This is NOT about Peyote as many mistakenly report. It is about Ayahuasca. A powerful, sacred tool for self exploration. The shaman is wearing Shipibo Indian fabric, a Ayahuasca tribe in Peru. As someone who has taken Ayahuasca on many occasions, I can say that this is one of the most well done accounts of this medicine's power. To reveal what one has hidden under layers of protection. In this case, that evil may indeed lie within. In its revelation and subsequent purge, liberation can be found.

Stephen

The "critic" did not get this movie AT ALL. This is NOT about Peyote as many mistakenly report. It is about Ayahuasca. A powerful, sacred tool for self exploration. The shaman is wearing Shipibo Indian fabric, a Ayahuasca tribe in Peru. As someone who has taken Ayahuasca on many occasions, I can say that this is one of the most well done accounts of this medicine's power. To reveal what one has hidden under layers of protection. In this case, that evil may indeed lie within. In its revelation and subsequent purge, liberation can be found.

Rob

Awful movie. So long, drawn out, and nonsensical that by the time you are halfway through the movie, you feel like shooting yourself.