Dom Hemingway (15)

Film

Drama

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>2</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
Rate this
 

Time Out says

Tue Nov 12 2013

It won’t take long for most people to decide whether they can stomach the exuberance of Jude Law’s overeager turn as a hyperactive ex-con in this stylised, waywardly violent comedy about an institutionalised hard-nut hitting the streets after 12 years inside. The confrontational opening scene (a hint: Law has got his trousers down) is likely to catapult viewers to different sides of the taste divide too. He is Dom Hemingway: safecracker, absent father, loyal friend to fellow crim Dickie (Richard E Grant, camp in a world-weary way) and former accomplice of kingpin Mr Fontaine (Demian Bichir), whose bacon he saved by keeping schtum. Now Dom wants his reward, so he and Dickie head to Fontaine’s French villa for decadence and payback.

The idea of Dom keeping quiet about anything is a laugh: he’s a one-man megaphone, spouting and spitting filthy sub-Harold Pinter lingo. The fruity dialogue works for a bit as the rest of ‘Dom Hemingway’ also sits to the left of the real – sets, events and costumes are all heightened. Yet the film loses any real sense of purpose too early, and the tone seriously starts to wobble. Later attempts to mine sentiment are awkward, and there are only so many scenes anyone can take of Law (never suited to the geezer role) strutting down streets shooting his gob off. If it was all in service of a smart story, so be it. But it isn’t.

0

Reviews

Add +

Release details

Rated:

15

UK release:

Fri Nov 15, 2013

Duration:

94 mins

Cast and crew

Cast:

Jude Law, Richard E Grant, Demián Bichir

Director:

Richard Shepard

Screenwriter:

Richard Shepard

Users say

0
<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

4.3 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:3
  • 4 star:4
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|10
1 person listening
jocelyn

Despite the terrible reviews I really enjoyed this film. It was quite hard to find a cinema that actually showed this film without travelling to central London. The costume director should get an award for Richard E. Grant and Jude Law's suits - they were brilliant!

Blink'n'Miss

Woweee! Some of the lines from this gangster opus are still rattling around my cranium. Richard Shepard (The Matador) can sure pen some rattling prose, and Jude Law runs hard with it as Dom Hemingway. It's all bluster and bravado, though, cause all Dom wants is to reconcile with his estranged daughter (played by Emilia Clarke). It's a film of two halves, but there is much to enjoy and admire. And Withnail to boot. Go, see.

Blink'n'Miss

Woweee! Some of the lines from this gangster opus are still rattling around my cranium. Richard Shepard (The Matador) can sure pen some rattling prose, and Jude Law runs hard with it as Dom Hemingway. It's all bluster and bravado, though, cause all Dom wants is to reconcile with his estranged daughter (played by Emilia Clarke). It's a film of two halves, but there is much to enjoy and admire. And Withnail to boot. Go, see.

Friend of Dickie

I went to an early screening and had no expectations. Jude Law is brilliant, best role in years but agree with Ask about Richard E Grant, steals every scene he's in. Unfair to compare to classic like Sexy Beast but had a great time with Dom and Dickie.

ASK

Saw this at a preview and really enjoyed it as a slice of London life. Law is a treat as the lead character, barely recognisable with a broken nose, a gut and muttonchops. He really goes all out, but Richard E. Grant steals the show in a hilarious turn as his best friend in a succession of natty suits, good to see him onscreen again. The film is pure pleasure - if you liked Sexy Beast, you will enjoy this.

Movie Nerd

Dom Hemingway is an ex-con trying to get his life in order - he's rude, crude, and fantastically funny. But beyond the in-your-face profanity, this is the story of a man who’s been in prison for the last 12 years. Whilst the rest of the world has grown-up he hasn’t; his suits are ill fitting, his casual racism is glaringly out of place. Amongst the mayhem, there is a sadness and Dom is eventually forced to confront his mistakes, by attempting to reconcile with the daughter he left behind. The final act brings these opposing elements together in a rich and satisfying way. Jude Law's performance is brilliant - best British film of the year.

Movie Nerd

Dom Hemingway is an ex-con trying to get his life in order - he's rude, crude, and fantastically funny. But beyond the in-your-face profanity, this is the story of a man who’s been in prison for the last 12 years. Whilst the rest of the world has grown-up he hasn’t; his suits are ill fitting, his casual racism is glaringly out of place. Amongst the mayhem, there is a sadness and Dom is eventually forced to confront his mistakes, by attempting to reconcile with the daughter he left behind. The final act brings these opposing elements together in a rich and satisfying way. Jude Law's performance is brilliant - best British film of the year.

Fräulein

Jude Law owns the screen in this! If he doesn't win a BAFTA I'll eat my hat. The film also features Game of Thrones' Emilia Clarke singing (beautifully) in a scene. Highly entertaining, and poignant too. The mix of tones may not be to all tastes, but I loved it and Jude Law's performance is bloody fantastic.

Fräulein

Jude Law owns the screen in this! If he doesn't win a BAFTA I'll eat my hat. The film also features Game of Thrones' Emilia Clarke singing (beautifully) in a scene. Highly entertaining, and poignant too. The mix of tones may not be to all tastes, but I loved it and Jude Law's performance is bloody fantastic.