Killer of Sheep

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>2</span>/5
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Time Out says

A gritty, grainy slice of everyday lumpen American black struggle, marking the difficulty of maintaining slow-buck integrity - the title refers to a family breadwinner's slaughterhouse job. Shot with a telling near-documentary technique on a poverty-row budget, but lifted right out of any cinematic ghetto by the best compilation sound-track you'll hear for many a year, ranging through an unfamiliar black catalogue from Paul Robeson to electric blues.
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Release details

UK release:

1977

Duration:

84 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

1.3 / 5

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Milan

I don't remember when the last film was given 6* in TO and I had such high hopes, but alas... "...film offers a firm rebuttal to black stereotypes in cinema while rendering the torpor of the daily grind as a prolonged and beautiful struggle for survival." - Watching this film was less beautiful and more struggle "In terms of story, that’s pretty much it (a series of jokes, social encounters and family ‘scenes’ that coalesce to create a rich and realistic depiction of black urban America), but for a film in which each frame bursts with texture, mood and an aching sensitivity towards life’s small moments of pain and euphoria, there’s little need for more." - Somehow pain and aching are the words that first come in mind after watching "As Stan toils, local youths pass the time in disused railway sidings, scuttling about aimlessly, throwing stones, fighting and laughing: these scenes are as rhapsodic as any in Malick’s ‘Days of Heaven’." - I'd say the stress is on "pass time" and "aimlessly" then on rhapsodic Some good music though. A good début film on a low budget, but it is an insult to many brilliant films out there that TO marked 3* or 4*.