Kinky Boots

Film, Drama
  • 3 out of 5 stars
(1user review)
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The latest would-be crowd-pleasing Britcom takes its cue from a true story, and offers befuddled Joel Edgerton, who’s just inherited a traditional Northampton shoe factory heading for bankruptcy, unlikely salvation in the beefy form of Chiwetel Ejiofor’s drag artiste – who reveals a hitherto unsuspected niche for sturdy high heels suitable for chaps in dresses. Thus we get triumph-of-the-underdog with a sequinned twist, except that the movie makes a real meal of getting to its all-singing, all-dancing finale at a Milan fashion show. There’s a dreary half-hour of contrived complications in the middle, for instance, while the chemistry between the two male leads is policed to rule out any suggestion of mutual attraction – instead, Edgerton faces a clumsily loaded choice between his duck-faced nominal fiancée and Sarah-Jane Potts’ perky salt-of-the-earth employee. Ejiofor, on the other hand, runs through his dance routines with gusto, gets to sing ‘Whatever Lola Wants’, but has no discernible sexuality of his own. Overall, it’s breezy, forgettable fluff, but ‘kinky’? Obviously, the term is relative.

By: TJ

Posted:

Release details

Rated: 12A
Release date: Friday October 7 2005
Duration: 107 mins

Cast and crew

Director: Julian Jarrold
Cast: Linda Bassett
Joel Edgerton
Nick Frost
Chiwetel Ejiofor
Gwenllian Davies
Ewan Hooper

Average User Rating

3 / 5

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Well following on from the musical of the same name, which I saw just last week, I had to go and watch the film didn't I? Of course it's probably a little unfair to the film to do it this way, the stage show is of course a super shiny sparkly musical and the film isn't, so it kind of makes the film seem rather dull in comparison.

However, having seen the show first, it allowed me to appreciated what the film was better at - that is a slower, more sensitive and more deeply explored story, where each character was able to shine a little bit in their own right. 

The plot itself is a simple, sweet one, and is in fact only based loosely on a true story. The entire character Lola, it turns out, is actually fictional, which was disappointing to find out. However, Chiwetel Ejiofor plays him so well, that I'm entirely grateful she was created.

Some of the scenes, such as the contrats between Lola on stage dancing and Charlie designing a new boot, are really well done and it was lovely to watch the banter and comraderie between the factory workers, which felt very genuine.

A gentle, very British, entertaining and funny film at times, catch it if you get the chance, but if you don't you're not missing one of the silver screens greatest hits. Now the West-End show, on the other hand, that's a different story....