L'Avventura

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5
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Time Out says

Wed Jun 27 2007

Though once compared to Psycho, made the same year and also about a couple searching for a woman who mysteriously disappears after featuring heavily in the opening reel, Antonioni's film could not be more dissimilar in tone and effect. Slow, taciturn and coldly elegant in its visual evocation of alienated, isolated figures in a barren Sicilian landscape, the film concerns itself less with how and why the girl vanished from a group of bored and wealthy socialites on holiday, than with the desultory nature of the romance embarked upon by her lover and her best friend while they half-heartedly look for her. If it once seemed the ultimate in arty, intellectually chic movie-making, the film now looks all too studied and remote a portrait of emotional sterility.
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Release details

UK release:

1960

Duration:

145 mins

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LiveReviews|8
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maria

the pain & beauty of Monica Vitti's melancholy character rescue this film from the perils inherent in character studies. this film is not for everyone, nor for anyone at all times (lord knows i can't watch some of Antonioni's other offerings!), but, for us fans of Vitti & Italia, it holds much power.

maria

the pain & beauty of Monica Vitti's melancholy character rescue this film from the perils inherent in character studies. this film is not for everyone, nor for anyone at all times (lord knows i can't watch some of Antonioni's other offerings!), but, for us fans of Vitti & Italia, it holds much power.

Iain Martin

This film is a lot of pretentious rubbish. There's not a lot of point in carefully constructing in-depth character portraits when the characters you're portraying are boring, stupid and completely devoid of any interesting traits which might make the audience care about them one iota. If you're going to completely sacrifice plot for character (and by God does this film sacrifice plot) the characters have to be interesting enough to make it worthwhile. In my opinion the characters in this film are not. It seems to me that this film has gained its reputation because it takes an approach to narrative and character development that hadn't been done before and adopts a fairly bold tactic by completely ditching a seemingly important plot thread. However, just because something is new and/or groundbreaking, doesn't mean that it's good. Films shouldn't be a chore to watch, and this one was. I wouldn't waste your time.

guest

After the island scene, this becomes the most boring movie in the history of space-time.

Technoguy

The first in a trilogy of films about couples in a crisis, L’Avventura takes place in an Italy enjoying an economic boom. The couple in L’Avventura is made up of Monica Vitti and Gabrielle Ferzetti. Sandro (Ferzetti) is an architect ,an intellectual, as in all three films, with the story of the same couple almost. An event, the loss of Sandro’s mistress(Anna),while out on Islands of Aeolia. nrth of Sicily, precedes the coming together of Claudia (Vitti) and Sandro as new lovers.The sense of alienation and existentialist absurdity are captured by the framing of the scenes and the sense of drawn out time, and the way black and white contrasts play out over a range of greys. Feelings of love that have been around for thousands of years do not find easy accommodation in a consumerist world. The ancient vase that is found becomes broken, old fine buildings are made into police barracks. All the characters look a bit lost with the loss of middle class values. People do not relate easily to each other nor live their love affairs. Beyond the narrative the framing captures the visual poetry of loss, the way empty spaces emerge through his compositions, the way he places actors in disharmony with their environments. His camera probes the trace of the loss on the couple’s actions, within an in-between space,where things, people, close to emptiness , are about to change or events are about to turn, in this void or absence. Moving from frame to frame brings out a sense of uneasy vigilance and instability in the audience viewing a world where feelings are adrift, where something(not nothing) is always happening on screen. His major innovation is a way of looking at things in the world. He explores states of feeling and breakdowns in communication,emptiness,alertness,vacancy, heightened awareness of others and oneself. We see bodies moving in space and a perception of the world no longer determined by a narrative framework. The thing filmed is the initial situation of loss and the echo of that loss. All Antonioni is filming(and why his films are hard to define) is what comes afterwards, te trace that’s left behind.

Technoguy

The first in a trilogy of films about couples in a crisis, L’Avventura takes place in an Italy enjoying an economic boom. The couple in L’Avventura is made up of Monica Vitti and Gabrielle Ferzetti. Sandro (Ferzetti) is an architect ,an intellectual, as in all three films, with the story of the same couple almost. An event, the loss of Sandro’s mistress(Anna),while out on Islands of Aeolia. nrth of Sicily, precedes the coming together of Claudia (Vitti) and Sandro as new lovers.The sense of alienation and existentialist absurdity are captured by the framing of the scenes and the sense of drawn out time, and the way black and white contrasts play out over a range of greys. Feelings of love that have been around for thousands of years do not find easy accommodation in a consumerist world. The ancient vase that is found becomes broken, old fine buildings are made into police barracks. All the characters look a bit lost with the loss of middle class values. People do not relate easily to each other nor live their love affairs. Beyond the narrative the framing captures the visual poetry of loss, the way empty spaces emerge through his compositions, the way he places actors in disharmony with their environments. His camera probes the trace of the loss on the couple’s actions, within an in-between space,where things, people, close to emptiness , are about to change or events are about to turn, in this void or absence. Moving from frame to frame brings out a sense of uneasy vigilance and instability in the audience viewing a world where feelings are adrift, where something(not nothing) is always happening on screen. His major innovation is a way of looking at things in the world. He explores states of feeling and breakdowns in communication,emptiness,alertness,vacancy, heightened awareness of others and oneself. We see bodies moving in space and a perception of the world no longer determined by a narrative framework. The thing filmed is the initial situation of loss and the echo of that loss. All Antonioni is filming(and why his films are hard to define) is what comes afterwards, te trace that’s left behind.