Lore (15)

Film

Drama

Lore.jpg

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5
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Time Out says

Tue Feb 19 2013

Germany, 1945, and Lore is a pretty, blond-haired 14-year-old raised on Nazi hate as her dad is a high-ranking SS officer. Cate Shortland’s dark and upsetting film is told from the point of view of defeated Germans after WWII. The Fuhrer is dead. The Allies are rounding up Nazi top brass. We meet Lore (Saskia Rosendahl) as her dad is leaving for a prison camp – not before burning documents and medical records of atrocities. Her mum follows him, telling Lore to take her little brothers and sisters through the Black Forest to their grandmother’s house. Like the bleakest fairytale you can imagine, these babes in the woods start their road trip. This is the land of the defeated. We don’t see any actual violence, but there are bodies and everywhere people unhinged by war. In one startling scene, a man backs away from Lore crying, ‘Child, you smell of death!’ The stench of evil has contaminated even the air.

Rosendahl is astonishing as Lore, who is very much her father’s daughter. She looks with disgust at a crippled boy. She hates Jews. But during her journey the spell is broken. Slowly the truth is revealed – she has been lied to by her parents and society. There’s an incredibly intense moment when she sees posters put up by the allies – the first images of concentration camps, piles of bodies heaped on top of each other like rubbish. And she meets a refugee boy – a Jew. It’s a close, intimate film – sometimes so close you can feel the breath of its characters in your face.

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Release details

Rated:

15

UK release:

Fri Feb 22, 2013

Duration:

109 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

Cate Shortland

Cast:

Saskia Rosendahl, Nele Trebs, André Frid

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5
LiveReviews|9
1 person listening
Justin Berkovi

Lore? More like BORE. Over sexualised actress, lingering shots, pretentious score. A terrible film with little substance, emotion, tension or anything to recommend. Avoid!

Bill

I was a U.S. infantryman fighting thru Germany in the last months of the war. The film has the German attitude right -- I remember a hausfrau in a village saying "Ich habe anxt" We thot it was some disease till my pocket dictionary showed "anxt" meant "fear". Later, she said "But when I saw you nice boys, I knew you wouldn't hurt us". And indeed, we were far easier on the Germans than our allies -- we had no scores to settle. The children's journey, however, reminded me more of "The Sound of Music" than of the reality I saw -- they were strangely alone, when actually the whole country was swarming with refugees, every road clogged with people frantically heading west. And a real Jew would have been a walking skeleton in a ragged striped uniform.

Mary

So boring - I went over Easter with 2 others and we all agreed. Very disjointed, fragmented and very annoying. If I'd been there on my own I would have got up and left. I see a lot of films and I don't often feel like that.

Ian

Fantastic film. A kind of companion piece to White Ribbon, with nods to Malick along the way. Quite harrowing portrait of a country reduced to a feral level of survival, with the attendant realisation of the horrors committed in their name. From the standpoint of a child it is shattering, as she learns how thin the veneer of society is. Terrific use of sound and cinematography.

Ian

Fantastic film. A kind of companion piece to White Ribbon, with nods to Malick along the way. Quite harrowing portrait of a country reduced to a feral level of survival, with the attendant realisation of the horrors committed in their name. From the standpoint of a child it is shattering, as she learns how thin the veneer of society is. Terrific use of sound and cinematography.

Rob Leggatt

Narratively limp, visually over-fussy and pretentious. Like a Vice magazine fashion shoot with WW2 refugees as it's theme.

Alfredo Borras

Sometimes the best films go unnoticed. Lore is not Hollywood special effects entertainment but brutal reality. A most disturbing and sad story beautifully told. A gem

Alfredo Borras

Sometimes the best films go unnoticed. Lore is not Hollywood special effects entertainment but brutal reality. A most disturbing and sad story beautifully told. A gem

Andrew Conway

Spot on review and like "Somersault", a good, important film. 3.75 stars from me only because I felt that the music was heavy handed at times and I whilst this was an original, unpredictable film, I didn't learn much that was new. (no spoiler, don't worry) Lore's final act was a prescient one, it put me in mind Germany's internal divisions in the 1960's, when the younger generation openly confronted the older one.