Project Wild Thing (PG)

Film

Documentaries

Project Wild Thing

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5

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Time Out says

Tue Oct 22 2013

His kids are three and five, and already David Bond is worried that they’re spending too much time in front of TV and tablet screens, instead of running around outside like he did at their age. So he appoints himself Marketing Director for Nature, and tries to figure out how to sell open space, greenery and wild stuff to today’s tech-addicted kids and their over-protective parents.

If the message seems a bit obvious and the delivery something of a ‘Super Size Me’ gimmick, Bond at least keeps the film pacy, packed with cute animation and worthwhile experts. He conjures up some heart-tugging moments – like the city kid who walks his dog on a patch of grass little bigger than a rug. Still, it always feels like we’re watching a campaign video, so the preaching-to-the converted vibe is inescapable. Though credit where it’s due, the film has prompted the National Trust and RSPB to form The Wild Network to bring families and nature together. And, perhaps inevitably, there’s also an iPhone app, Wildtime, because while getting children into green space is one thing, getting them off their phones is another entirely.

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Release details

Rated:

PG

UK release:

Sun Oct 27, 2013

Duration:

83 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

David Bond

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

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Lilly Marne

this film is really uplifting and positive and funny. it is also quirky and asks some pretty big/challenging questions about the unnatural, consumerist, risk averse and screen-dominated world we have created for kids.

Lilly Marne

this film is really uplifting and positive and funny. it is also quirky and asks some pretty big/challenging questions about the unnatural, consumerist, risk averse and screen-dominated world we have created for kids.