The Missouri Breaks

Film

Westerns

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Time Out says

A wonderfully quirky Western, brilliantly scripted by Thomas McGuane, which strips all the cute whimsy away from the Butch Cassidy theme (outlaws on the run from a relentless lawman), replacing it with a kind of pixillated terror. Playing the 'regulator' as a camp Buffalo Bill with an Irish accent, Brando makes his entrance playing peekaboo from behind his horse, and at one point even stalks his prey in a dress and poke bonnet. But he is also a legalised killer, expert with a rifle but preferring (as the flail of God) to use a harpoon shaped like a crucifix. And as his gloating sadism shades into hints of bizarre perversion when he dedicates a love song and a kiss to his horse, the tone gradually darkens to a kind of horror. It's one of the few truly major Westerns of the '70s, with a very clear vision of the historical role played by fear and violence in the taming of the wilderness.
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Release details

UK release:

1976

Duration:

126 mins

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Richard Hinton

It is clear to me that this is a fictionalized account of Harvey Logan. In several instances Tom Logan is obviously lying about being related to Harvey or his three siblings. The references of the "fiddle player" (his brother Lonnie logan) is indeed fact and present my theory beyond argument.

Richard Hinton

It is clear to me that this is a fictionalized account of Harvey Logan. In several instances Tom Logan is obviously lying about being related to Harvey or his three siblings. The references of the "fiddle player" (his brother Lonnie logan) is indeed fact and present my theory beyond argument.