Glasser – 'Interiors' album review

An smart electro-pop record with a thing for architecture

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Time Out Ratings :

<strong>Rating: </strong>4/5


To say that ‘Interiors’ is into the idea of architecture is a bit like saying the Pope is into the idea of Catholicism. On her second album Cameron Mesirow, aka singer and producer Glasser, is simply obsessed with structure. She has, for example, created a trio of songlets called ‘Window I’, ‘Window II’ and ‘Window III’. They’re joined by ‘Shape’, ‘Design’ and ‘Landscape’.

If this all sounds as dry as a properly weatherproofed domicile, then you only need to listen to the first few, overlapping howls of Mesirow’s warm voice on ‘Shape’ to understand how the intellectual meets the emotional in her music. Björk is the biggest musical influence (Rem Koolhaas is apparently her architectural inspiration), and there are many more synthetic pulses and slick production tricks on this LP to bring the Brooklynite artist in line with her Icelandic idol. The melodies played on mallet instruments that defined Mesirow’s 2010 debut, ‘Ring’, are still present, but they’ve been incorporated into fully-formed pop songs – especially synth-led thumper ‘Keam Theme’.

The experimental is still allowed to interrupt the beautiful, however, and there are plenty of unexpected turns throughout ‘Interiors’ – abrupt silences, and uppity time signatures rubbing up against triumphant horn or string sections. Frankly, you can get inside this album, and still not fully understand it. As Mesirow sings on ‘Exposure’, summing up the numinous pleasure of experiencing a great building: ‘In its reflection we can feel what lies ahead. More unknown.’


Buy this album here

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Listen to Glasser on Spotify

Watch the video for 'Shape'


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