The best and worst Woody Allen movies

From nourishment to nebbishment (and all points in between), we rank the comedian-director’s 43 features

He’s made a movie a year for decades—and we can’t hide our broadest smiles when Woody Allen’s white credits pop up on a black screen and the jazz music kicks in. As for the romances, dramas and comedies that follow? We’ve got opinions. Take a trip through our countdown of Woody’s career: his ups, his downs, his essential masterpieces.

Written by Dave Calhoun, Cath Clarke, Tom Huddleston, Joshua Rothkopf and Keith Uhlich

43–30

Scoop (2006)

The worst of Woody’s European jaunts, this one didn’t even receive theatrical distribution in the country in which it’s set: Britain. Woody paired himself with Scarlett Johansson to play, respectively, a magician called the Great Splendini and a journalism student who goes on the trail of a killer. It’s not radical to call it his low point.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Whatever Works (2009)

Originally written in the early 1970s as a project for the mighty Zero Mostel, this misanthropic comedy was rooted out of the script drawer and retooled for Curb Your Enthusiasm’s Larry David. The results aren’t terrible—just not especially likable. The characters are fairly obnoxious, the script is largely joke-free, and the plot doesn’t go anywhere.—Tom Huddleston

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Cassandra's Dream (2007)

The beginning of the 21st century was a hard time to be a Woody Allen fan. On a losing streak of London-set films, he crossed to the dark side with this thin drama starring Ewan McGregor and Colin Farrell as brothers who agree to do a hit for their uncle to get them out of a tough spot.—Cath Clarke

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Anything Else (2003)

Smack-dab in the middle of a halfhearted period for the Woodman, this shrill romantic comedy stumbles mainly in casting: As the manipulative, noncommittal Amanda, Christina Ricci never quite taps into humor. Meanwhile, Jason Biggs turns Allen’s stammering everynebbish into a bland carbon copy. It feels like an American Pie sequel without the pastry.—Joshua Rothkopf

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Hollywood Ending (2002)

In what feels more like a padded short story, the director-star plays a formerly great filmmaker reduced to overseeing TV ads. When he’s finally tapped for a big project, the guy suffers an instant, psychosomatic stroke of blindness—yet the show goes on. The movie-set slapstick is tired, as are Allen’s satirical jabs at moneyed showbiz types.—Joshua Rothkopf

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Match Point (2005)

It was meant to be Woody’s comeback. Instead, it set the tone for his inexplicable “London period” of avoidable films, with their toneless dialogue and uneven acting. It’s a sub-Highsmith thriller about ambition and deception among the upper classes, in which a tennis coach (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) wheedles his way into a rich family.—Cath Clarke

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Melinda and Melinda (2004)

Overly schematic, this was the one that had a bunch of brainy playwrights eating at Pastis, batting around a simple scenario, one of them shaping it as a comedy, the other as drama. As the fictional title character, intense Radha Mitchell can’t pull off half of the equation—and it’s hard to say if Winona Ryder, intended to star, would have done it any better.—Joshua Rothkopf

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001)

This ’40s-set screwball comedy came shortly before Woody departed to make films in Europe for several years. It features the director as an insurance investigator who’s unwittingly hypnotized to carry out jewel heists; audiences struggled with the aging Allen putting himself in romantic situations with Charlize Theron.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

To Rome with Love (2012)

An extremely patchy patchwork of stories set in modern Rome, this film has tourist Woody meeting his Italian future son-in-law for the first time in the Italian capital. The high point is an opera singer whose talents only emerge in the shower—so he takes the entire cubicle onstage with him, to great acclaim.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy (1982)

A rare straightforward remake for Woody—unsurprisingly, of an Ingmar Bergman movie. Smiles of a Summer Night (1955) was one of the Swedish master’s jolliest, least angst-ridden films, and Woody follows suit with an enormously likable if totally lightweight comedy of romantic misunderstandings in a bucolic country setting.—Tom Huddleston

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

September (1987)

It’s hard to pick another American director as consistently on fire as Allen was in the ’80s, yet this Bergmanesque domestic drama outfoxed him. Notoriously, he reshot it with a different cast, but the longueurs remained. Regardless, the presence of a majestically rude Elaine Stritch (R.I.P.) goes a long way. It remains Allen’s worst-performing film, but an intriguing one.—Joshua Rothkopf

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Shadows and Fog (1991)

One of Woody’s less successful experiments with genre. Shadows and Fog draws on his beloved German Expressionism to create a world of murky morals and shifting allegiances, steeped in Kafkaesque angst. The film is beautiful to look at, but the mismatched cast-—John Malkovich, Jodie Foster, Madonna—and uneven script leave the film feeling awkward and uneasy.—Tom Huddleston

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

30–21

Everyone Says I Love You (1996)

A Woody Allen musical drawing on the Great American Songbook was always going to be a love-it-or-leave-it affair. Roger Ebert rated the giddy Venice-set lark as one of Woody’s best, while others detected a lack of sparks between the megastar cast, one that included Julia Roberts, Edward Norton and Drew Barrymore, among others. All in all, it feels more like a technical exercise than a heartfelt romance.—Tom Huddleston

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Small Time Crooks (2000)

Time to exercise those muscles of compartmentalization: Half of this lunkhead crime comedy aches with obviousness, especially the overfamiliar plot (digging a tunnel under a nearby bank). But the other half is killer: two magnificent female turns, one from Tracey Ullman as a nouveau riche social climber, the other from Elaine May, raising pitch-perfect dumbness to high art.—Joshua Rothkopf

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Midnight in Paris (2011)

In the film that earned Woody a late-career box-office hit, Owen Wilson vacations in Paris with his fiancée (Rachel McAdams) and her parents; over several nights, he accidentally travels back to the 1920s. It’s easily the best of Woody’s European travelogue comedies, and the fantasy element offers flashes of the director’s earlier boldness.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Celebrity (1998)

Hollywood stars trip over themselves to work with Woody Allen: Wall-to-wall A-listers are the reason to watch Celebrity. In one of the funniest scenes, Kenneth Branagh’s journalist has sex with an actor (Melanie Griffith) and then immediately pitches her a script. But best is Leonardo DiCarpio as a hotel-trashing bad boy (and remember, this was in DiCaprio’s Pussy Posse days, before he went all eco-crunchy.)—Cath Clarke

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Bananas (1971)

While trying to impress a girl, Allen’s neurotic New Yorker Fielding Mellish gets embroiled in a South American revolution and unwittingly ends up as the leader of a banana republic. Among the many gems: the dizzying courtroom sequence with its gut-busting wordplay (“It’s a travesty of a mockery of a sham of a mockery of a travesty of two mockeries of a sham!”) and special appearance by J. Edgar Hoover.—Keith Uhlich

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993)

This self-conscious attempt to return to the tone of his “early, funny films” following a series of darker efforts succeeds in large part, thanks to a wonderful cast of regulars: Anjelica Huston, Alan Alda, Diane Keaton and the director himself. It’s a goofy, lightweight Hitchcockian thriller crammed with good gags and fun characters.—Tom Huddleston

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Alice (1990)

A loose remake of Federico Fellini’s Juliet of the Spirits (1965), Allen’s romantic fantasy provides an exceptional showcase for Mia Farrow as an upper-class New York housewife whose placid existence is upended after she’s put under hypnosis. A single-take sequence where she confesses her feelings for costar Joe Mantegna is a comic-acting master class.—Keith Uhlich

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

What's Up, Tiger Lily? (1966)

For his feature debut, Allen took a Japanese spy film (Key of Keys) and overdubbed all the dialogue so that it become a comedy about the search for the world’s greatest egg-salad recipe. It’s a bit choppy at times, but the wordplay and sight gags—like the half-naked woman asking her lover to “name three presidents”—are consistently hilarious.—Keith Uhlich

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Take the Money and Run (1969)

A handful of nutty moments keep this comedy about a criminally incompetent bank robber above mediocrity (if just). Funniest of all is the bank holdup scene, in which Allen’s robber argues with the bank clerk over the handwriting of his note: “That looks like gub,” the clerk insists. “Not gun.—Cath Clarke

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Radio Days (1987)

It’s the evocation of family life in Brooklyn in the 1940s, the era in which Woody grew up, which lingers long in the mind after seeing this kaleidoscopic, nostalgic portrait of a childhood spent surrounded by everyday eccentrics while dreaming of a distant celebrity world evoked over the airwaves. The familiar cast (Mia Farrow, Diane Keaton, Dianne Wiest) lends it a very personal, homecoming feel.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

20–11

Mighty Aphrodite (1995)

A sparky spin on Pygmalion, with some comic classical references (including an intermittent Greek chorus) thrown in for good measure, this is a witty tale of a man (Allen) who becomes obsessed with the identity of the biological mother of his adopted child. He tracks her down only to discover she’s a ding-a-ling prostitute (Mira Sorvino), whom he feels determined to straighten out.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008)

Just when Allen fans were about to give up the ghost, along came his best film in a decade. On paper, it reads like one of the director’s ickier old-man fantasies: the story of two young American women in Europe (Rebecca Hall and Scarlett Johansson) seduced by an artist (Javier Bardem) with a crazy ex-wife (Penélope Cruz). But there are flashes of the old genius in this throwaway but enjoyable comedy.—Cath Clarke

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Sleeper (1973)

A health-food store proprietor (Allen) is cryogenically frozen in 1973 and awakens 200 years later when the world has become a police state. Dystopian sci-fi has rarely been so funny: Just try to stifle those laughs when Woody disguises himself as a robotic butler or hides from police in the aptly named Orgasmatron.—Keith Uhlich

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Stardust Memories (1980)

Following directly in the wake of effervescent Manhattan, Allen’s agonized existential-crisis comedy—something of a public meltdown—was destined to turn off part of his audience. But the movie has since found a footing among Woody’s best, not merely as a smart riff on Federico Fellini’s director-as-hero 8½, but as a piece of self-referential hilarity in its own right.—Joshua Rothkopf

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Interiors (1978)

Sandwiched in time between Annie Hall and Manhattan, this was the film with which Woody declared his love for Ingmar Bergman. Wintry, quiet and restrained, with not a hint of a gag (or Woody himself) in sight, it tells of three grown-up sisters who find themselves in a tailspin when their parents unexpectedly announce their divorce.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

Deconstructing Harry (1997)

After years of playing put-upon nice guys, Allen shocked audiences with his portrait of the artist as a resentful, self-loathing creep with a foul mouth and a penchant for prostitutes. Coming in the wake of his brutal public separation from Mia Farrow, this is Woody at his most savage, satirical and self-mocking. A bruising, brilliant film.—Tom Huddleston

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Another Woman (1988)

Further proof that some of Woody’s finest films are those that drop the kvetching men to explore troubled women (see Interiors, Blue Jasmine). This one gives Gena Rowlands a plum role as a feted academic who only realizes that she’s behaved terribly to others when she accidentally overhears a woman (Mia Farrow) talking to her therapist through the walls of her home office.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Bullets Over Broadway (1994)

“I’m an artist!” shouts John Cusack in the movie’s first line, and over the course of the next riotous 98 minutes, we learn, decidedly, he is not. Allen’s Jazz Age backstage comedy is animated by a trio of inspired creations: Jennifer Tilly’s ditsy gun moll turned theatrical terror; Dianne Wiest’s imperious diva (“Don’t speak!”); and Chazz Palminteri’s gangster poet, hiding the true gift.—Joshua Rothkopf

Read review   Watch on Amazon

Read more

Love and Death (1975)

Russian literature takes it in the keister in Allen’s gut-busting satire, in which he plays a coward forced to enlist in the Russian army who also wants to marry his cousin twice removed (Diane Keaton). There’s barely a lull in the laughter, and nothing beats Allen’s internal monologue about wheat.—Keith Uhlich

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Read more

10–1

1/10

Blue Jasmine (2013)

Would Blue Jasmine be half as good a film with another actor playing Jasmine, the self-destructive society wife living a champagne lifestyle on lemonade money after her husband is sent to prison? Perhaps not, but Woody Allen lucked out with Cate Blanchett, who gives a brilliant, Oscar-winning, career-best performance.—Cath Clarke

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

2/10

Zelig (1983)

Allen stars in this expertly executed mockumentary as Leonard Zelig, a nondescript man with chameleonic powers who shows up in the darnedest places throughout the ’20s and ’30s. He’s a proto–Forrest Gump, rubbing shoulders with everyone from Fanny Brice to Adolf Hitler, and catching the romantic eye of Mia Farrow’s doting psychologist.—Keith Uhlich

Read review   Watch on Amazon

3/10

Sweet and Lowdown (1999)

Off-kilter talents have often found voice in Woody’s work, and the pairing of Sean Penn and a barely known Samantha Morton as, respectively, a 1930s jazz musician and his mute girlfriend is especially winning. The film deals lovingly with the tunes of the period (especially those of gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt, an Allen favorite), and the faux-doc interview inserts give it a unique touch.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon

4/10

Purple Rose of Cairo (1985)

Woody’s at his most optimistic and up-with-people with this fantasy of a downtrodden Depression-era housewife (Mia Farrow) whose world comes alive when the pith-helmeted hero of her favorite movie (Jeff Daniels) steps down from the screen and sweeps her off her feet. The result is both a giddy celebration and a quietly crafty investigation into the effect cinema can have on its audience.—Tom Huddleston

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

5/10

Broadway Danny Rose (1984)

A bunch of hardworking comedians kibitz over coffee at the Carnegie Deli. From their reminiscences emerges a wonderful (fictional) tale, about scrappy talent manager Danny Rose (Allen) and his fiercely loyal slate of also-rans. A loving tribute to old-school New York moxie, the film also contains Mia Farrow’s brassy Italian ballbuster, a wild transformation you’ll never forget.—Joshua Rothkopf

Read review   Watch on Amazon

6/10

Husbands and Wives (1992)

This caustic comedy revolves around the romantic tribulations of two married couples played by Allen and Mia Farrow, and Sydney Pollack and Judy Davis. It’s a trenchant examination of long-term relationships on the downswing, something that the real-world tensions surrounding the production (the film was shot around the time of the Soon-Yi Previn scandal) only heighten.—Keith Uhlich

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

7/10

Manhattan (1979)

Greatest opening in cinema history? Gordon Willis’s glittering monochrome camerawork combines with Gershwin’s glorious glissandos and Woody’s scalpel-sharp self-mockery to create the ultimate hymn to a city, a sensation, a whole way of life. The remainder of the movie covers familiar ground—romance, self-doubt, intellectualism, despair—with Woody’s customary intelligence and insight.—Tom Huddleston

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

8/10

Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)

Here are Allen’s most exquisite performances: nuanced, perfectly balanced, lovably neurotic. There’s not a weak link in the cast, and while it’s a shame to single out an essential performance, it has to be Dianne Wiest’s unsettled Holly, the kind of desperate, flailing Manhattanite that future director-writers would spin entire careers out of.—Joshua Rothkopf

Read review   Watch on Amazon

9/10

Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989)

The film in which Woody’s comic and serious sides most comfortably align, this one tells of two barely connected characters, an eye doctor (Martin Landau) and a filmmaker (Allen), each with intricately messy private lives. Landau handles the doctor’s rising guilt and claustrophobia especially well, while the whole enterprise is entertaining, thoughtful, morally inquiring and hits just the right level of amusing.—Dave Calhoun

Read review   Watch on Amazon

10/10

Annie Hall (1977)

Woody Allen famously wanted to call it Anhedonia, the clinical inability to experience happiness—funny for a film that gives us so much pleasure. This best and best-loved of Woody’s movies is the anatomy of a breakup, beginning at the end of New York comedian Alvy Singer’s relationship with Annie (Diane Keaton, in an iconic turn). It’s packed with gags, and yet there is a painful message at its heart: that meeting your soulmate doesn’t always guarantee a happy ending.—Cath Clarke

Read review   Watch on Amazon   Watch on iTunes

Comments

30 comments
Alex S
Alex S

Some good choices, and many bad ones. Nice to see "Sweet And Lowdown" up there, and although I'd disagree with the order of the top 20, most of the key films are covered.

"Annie Hall" as #1 is merely a canonical choice, and not necessarily a wise. Sure, it's a really excellent depiction of human relationships, and especially of human manipulation -- for Alvy Singer IS the film's de facto 'bad guy,' and Annie much better off without him -- but "Manhattan" covers the same bases, and more deeply, while being an even richer excoriation of the film's protagonist.

Yet even "Manhattan" is limited. I mean, compared with a film like "Crimes And Misdemeanors," which is one of the 3 or 4 best depictions of human evil in all of art, or "Stardust Memories," which is a deep meditation on art, fatalism, luck, human patterning... there's not much of a comparison, really.

"Cassandra's Dream" and "Match Point" ought to be way higher. Even if they're lesser re-treads of "Crimes," they're still extremely well-executed, compared to most films of their genre, and manage to depict evil from a different, albeit lesser, intellectual angle vis-a-vis "Crimes."

Same with "Celebrity" -- a really good film, unfairly maligned due to Kenneth Branagh. Yet Branagh is not really doing a 'bad Woody impersonation,' but things that Woody, himself, would NEVER be able to do. There are a # of excellent flirting scenes, within, involving Winona Ryder, that'd merely devolve to comedy from Woody's presence. By contrast, Branagh is more realistic, and definitely seems like the sort of guy who'd try his hand at a lifestyle he really CANNOT handle.

I'd put "Stardust Memories," "Hannah And Her Sisters," "Another Woman," "Crimes," and "Interiors" somewhere on top. Here's my own top 10 list, as well as some in-depth reasons:

http://alexsheremet.com/woody-allens-top-10-films-analyzed-explained/

Ben C
Ben C

This list is backwards in many ways.  Broadway Danny Rose is soul-deadening.  Just what am I supposed to find amusing or enlightening about that junk?  That's why worst Woody Allen film.  Sweet & Lowdown just has no remarkable qualities.  I like the bold choice of making Crimes & Misdemeanors #2, though I wouldn't put it quite that high.  And Zelig and Purple Rose of Cairo were vapid gimmicks. Annie Hall just doesn't stand the test of time the way Manhattan does, though Manhattan, while boasting the best dialog, is marred by some bad acting from Michael Murphy and that awful Gershwin soundtrack my wife incisively called "Leave It to Beaver on steroids."

Here is my list.

1.  Husbands & Wives

2.  Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy

3.  Manhattan Murder Mystery

4.  Sleeper

5. Crimes & Misdemeanors

6.  Manhattan

7.  Another Woman 

8. Vicky Cristina Barcelona

9.  Love & Death

10.  Annie Hall

11. Midnight in Paris

12. Cassandra's Dream

13. You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger

14. Deconstructing Harry

15. Curse of the Jade Scorpion

16. Hannah & Her Sisters

17. Melinda & Melinda

WORST FILMS

Broadway Danny Rose

Stardust Memories

Zelig

Alice

Shadows & Fog

Hollywood Ending

Edward C
Edward C

this list is almost completely backwards, in my opinion. not that it really matters. i'll probably never watch one of his films again. i can't enjoy them knowing what i do about his personal life.

Alan Smithee
Alan Smithee

This page just about ruined my day.  I realize this is a highly subjective matter but we're treading on sacred ground here.  After reading this article and the comments, I'm feeling kind of like a devout Muslim forced peruse a sexy "12 Months of Muhammad" calendar.  Praise be to you, O blessed trinity of Allen, Coens and Kubrick.  Forgive them for they know not what they do.

Cayo H
Cayo H

Magic in the Moonlight will be in the bottom half of the list when this is revised.....but I still give almost every Woody film a look.....I dread the day when there won't be one each year.....

nubwaxer
nubwaxer

all i can remember is some kind of really lame word play i found offensive.  it's something along the lines that if someone says for example "did you . . . " woody's character pressures his friend to agree that he heard "did jew . . . " or something like that. 

actually when i saw number 43 i remembered that is was not entirely a waste of time to sit through it.  the rest of the list?  if i can't think of one outstanding film nby the director without going through the list then i don't have much interest here.

oh wait, zelig was interesting but hardly memorable.

Gaurav K
Gaurav K

Without getting into the painfully repeated thing about hundreds of dubious ratings online, just my personal favorites:

1. Broadway Danny Rose (A true masterpiece, criminally underrated)

2. Sweet and Lowdown (until Uma Thurman's poorly written character showed up and ruined the last 20 odd minutes)

3. Stardust Memories

4. Zelig

5. Deconstructing Harry

Hugo Emanuel M
Hugo Emanuel M

It's an informative list because it lists all of Allen's films but the rating is very dubious. I know everyone has a different opinion but frankly I can't understand how can to Rome with Love is rated higher than Match Point  or how Anything Else and Melinda and Melinda stands above Whatever Works. My personal Woody Allen favorites are Crimes and Misdemenours, Deconstructing Harry (sadly underrated), Sleeper, Manhattan, Husbands and Wives, Bullets over Broadway and Match Point. 

Robert L
Robert L

They are all works of genius and deserve serious study. You're witnessing the tortuous path of spiritual evolution of a lost yet educated Jewish atheist in our age, within a background of sardonic humor.

Shaz K
Shaz K

There are so many on this list that I didn't even know existed. I wish someone would release a giant Woody Allen films boxset!

anders n
anders n

They Forgot "Play It Again, Sam" which is an essential early comedy (1972)


Akash V
Akash V

Blue Jasmine being #10 is absurd. It wasn't that good. And for Gods sake, Annie Hall is not that good. His best films are-

Hannah and her Sisters, Crimes and Misdemeanors and Manhattan. Broadway danny Rose was fantastic as well. Deconstructing Harry, probably his most underrated film, deserves a top 10 spot.

Mark E
Mark E

I like almost every Woody film, but I'd say only about 15-20 of them are essential.  Your top 20 has 15 of my top 20.  So that's pretty good!


Bullets Over Broadway and Zelig are almost unwatchable, if you ask me.  Sleeper, Stardust Memories and Another Woman are fine, but not in my top 20.  We agree on the rest!

Scott F
Scott F

"Blue Jasmine" in the Top 10? Please. The film might as well take place in Moscow -- Woody has no feel for the rhythms or culture of San Francisco. It's another New York film, filled with New Yorkers, just happens to take place in San Francisco. Maybe his most overrated film.

I'll take "Crimes and Misdemeanors" at No. 1. And "Love and Death" belongs in the top 10.

will d
will d

This list has the same weight to it as Time Outs "Where to get the best Slice".  It's all subjective, and a ridiculous idea for a feature or whatever this is supposed to be.  Grade F Time Out.  

Chris M
Chris M

Blue Jasmine was not very good. It absolutely CANNOT be in the top 10 woody allen films.

David B
David B

The transcriber must have mistakenly switched positions for the thoughtful and thoroughly watchable #38 Match Point (2005) and the excruciatingly bad #8 Sweet and Lowdown (1999)...right? My pick for writer-director Allen's most wildly over-rated movie has to be #6 Broadway Danny Rose (1984). Everyone in it appears to be trying so hard to be funny, but there isn't an honest laugh in sight. Otherwise, I would largely agree with this list. Fun.

RJ M
RJ M

no Play it again, Sam?

Montse B
Montse B

Vicky, Christina, Barcelona is not only his worst film by far, but possibly one of the lamest I have ever see in my life. 

Stephen S
Stephen S

@Robert L 

Cassandra's Dream a work of genius? Don't be ridiculous, it's absolutely appalling

Cristobal F
Cristobal F

@Scott F So, a movie is only good if it thoroughly captures the "vibe" of the locale???  It just so happens that San Fransisco sucks.  I don't want to see anything about it on film.  Thank God it shows New Yorkers in San Francisco.  And after all, in real life many NYers are trapped in that stinkhole.  Their stories should be told.

David B
David B

@RJ M Yes, I would have placed Play It Again, Sam (1972) fairly high on this list but it can't be considered a "Woody Allen movie" since it was not directed by him. It was directed by Herbert Ross.

Robert L
Robert L

@Montse B You just don't get it! It's the story of millions of American tourist girls and how they get fucked by European sophisticates during their "vacation", be it from college, their boyfriend, or their husband.

Scott F
Scott F

@Cristobal F A movie that is about a locale should be true to that locale.

" It just so happens that San Fransisco sucks.  I don't want to see anything about it on film."

Ah, I see. You're an idiot.

Stephen S
Stephen S

@Robert L

You have serious issues, Bro AND you like every Woody Allen film ever made

Stephen S
Stephen S

@Robert L @Ben C 

Relax guys, Woody doesn't even know who you are. He wouldn't expect such a trenchant defense of one of the worst screenplays he's ever written. He'd most probably hope you'd be fine with it. He might wish, also, that you'd appreciate the good ones without the need to take ownership of, and defend, his life's work in some vainglorious bid to connect with him in a slightly worrying way...