Family-friendly restaurants and cafés

Hospitable Parisian hot spots, where kids are welcome and well catered for

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Enjoy a stress-free family feast - with Time Out's guide to Paris's child-friendly restaurants and cafés...

Breizh Café

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

With its modern interior of pale wood and its choice of 15 artisanal ciders, this outpost of a restaurant in Cancale, Brittany, is a world away from the average crêperie. For the complete faux-seaside experience, you might start with a plate of creuse oysters from Cancale before indulging in an inventive buckwheat galette such as the Cancalaise, made with potato, smoked herring from Brittany and herring roe. The choice of fillings is fairly limited, but the ingredients are of high quality - including the use of Valrhona chocolate with 70% cocoa solids in the dessert crêpes. This restaurant serves one of Time Out's 50 best dishes in Paris. Click here to see the full list.

  1. 109 rue Vieille du Temple, 3e
  2. Main courses €7-€15
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Breakfast in America

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 1/4

Even in Paris, the city of haute cuisine and knock-your-socks-off Brasserie fare, there comes a time when nothing but bacon, fried eggs, juicy burgers and fluffy pancakes drizzled in maple syrup will do. For those moments, Breakfast in America (known lovingly amongst regulars as B.I.A) offers bona fide American diner surroundings, all-day breakfasts and artery clogging delights like sticky pecan pie, washed down with bottomless mugs o’ Joe.  Needless to say it’s a hit with the brunch crowd who come in droves so large they queue up outside, rain or shine. Fortunately turn over is quite fast, so you rarely have to wait more than half-an-hour. The €15.95 brunch menu gets you comfort staples like sausages and eggs (over-easy, sunny-side up or scrambled) with toast and fries or a generous Connecticut ham and cheese omelet and a squidgy chocolate muffin. B.I.A won’t take reservations, but there’s a second branch in the Marais, so if Latin Quarter students have hogged all the tables, you can try your luck on the Right Bank.

  1. 17 rue des Ecoles, 5e
  2. Main courses €8.50-€11.50; brunch €15.95
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L'Estaminet

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4

Bobo, yes, but still lovely. Insulated from the honking horns of the city, this place is a true oasis in central Paris. This small, organic canteen is warm and welcoming, a tavern for weary urban travellers in the heart of the Enfants Rouges market. Though somewhat difficult to find, it is far from secret – especially in summer when the colourful chairs come out to allow customers to enjoy the aromas of the market. Brunch is served on Saturdays and Sundays, and the ‘traditional’ menu (€20) is hearty and original. In addition to hot drinks and organic apple juice, take your pick from scrambled eggs, salad, assorted cheeses and cold cuts, fruit salad, cottage cheese, scones and jam. A plate full of variety and good products, it competes with the ‘fish menu’, which, for an extra €2, replaces the sausage and cheese with smoked salmon, herring, mackerel and taramasalata.

  1. 39 rue de Bretagne, 3e
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Josselin

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4

The star crêperie of the area, and the one with the longest queues, is the prettily decorated Josselin, where the speciality is the Couple - two layers of galette with the filling in the middle. The savoury galette is followed by the dessert Crêpe de Froment, which comes in three varieties: classic (honey and lemon or wonderful caramel beurre salé); flambéed with calvados; or a fantasy creation oozing with chocolate, banana, ice cream and whipped cream. Wash it all down with bowls of cider, of which the brut is far better than the sweet. You'll be surprised how full you feel at the end and the bill should come to no more than €20 a head, a buckwheat bargain by Paris standards.

  1. 67 rue du Montparnasse, 14e
  2. Main courses €9
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Un Dimanche à Paris

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 3/4

Chocoholics will be in paradise in this concept store dedicated to cocoa, where an upscale brunch is served on Sundays. Only premium products are on offer: Poilane bread, Bordier butter and slices of Iberian ham. As part of the €55 menu, you also get foie gras with pear and crème de cassis (in autumn) and a glass of Champagne instead of juice. There are no muffins, but rather a madeleine, a mini-éclair and a slice of cake – all of which go perfectly with one of the best hot chocolates in Paris, made with real melted chocolate, milk, a little cream and a touch of cinnamon and vanilla. Naturally, this is not cheap (the basic menu will set you back €35), but the level of refinement justifies the price. And you can always dial up the decadence to the maximum while you’re there, with a cheeky visit to the chocolate shop next door.

  1. 4-8 cour du Commerce Saint-André, 6e
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Chez Hanna

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 1/4
  • Critics choice

By noon on a Sunday there is a queue outside every falafel shop along rue des Rosiers. The long-established L'As du Fallafel, a little further up the street, still reigns supreme, whereas Hanna remains something of a locals' secret, quietly serving up falafel and shawarma sandwiches to rival any in the world. A pitta sandwich bursting with crunchy chickpea-and-herb balls, tahini sauce and vegetables costs €4 if you order from the takeaway window, €8 if you sit at one of the tables in the buzzy dining room overlooking the street. Either way, you really can't lose. This restaurant serves one of Time Out's 50 best dishes in Paris. Click here to see the full list.

  1. 54 rue des Rosiers, 4e
  2. Main courses €12-€16
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Angelina

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Angelina is home to Paris's most lip-smackingly scrumptious desserts - all served in the faded grandeur of a belle époque salon just steps from the Louvre. The hot chocolate is pure decadence; try the speciality 'African', a velvety potion so thick that you need a spoon to consume it. Epicurean delights include the Mont Blanc dessert, a ball of meringue covered in whipped cream and sweet chestnut, and, for those with a waistline to watch, a brand new sugar- and butter-free brioche aux fruits rouges. The place heaves at weekends, so be prepared to queue.

  1. 226 rue de Rivoli, 1er
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Little Breizh

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Amongst the numerous crêperies in Paris few really stand out. Despite its location, in the middle of a very touristic street, Little Breizh promises something a little different with its creatively named crêpes (including Sea Chic and Say Cheese) and quality ingredients. After numerous unsuccessful attempts to make a booking via telephone (no one was answering) we decided to just turn up and given it was quite early, got a table. But the tiny room, with a Breton flag draped in front of the open plan kitchen, did fill up quickly. If none of the nine house specialities tempt you, you can also create your own crêpe from the list of ingredients – Bordier butter, Espelette pepper, Andouille sausage, artichoke hearts and many more. But our table of five (including two children) was happy with the house offerings, all heartily filled and prettily folded in order to show off the garnishes – even if not quite at the same level as those at the Breizh Café.In the Saint-Jacques de la Coquine Saint-Jacques (€13) toasted nuts are laid on a pear fondue coated with an onion and cream sauce. The Say Cheese (€9.90), garnished with goat’s cheese, cooked apples, nuts and honey, has the perfect balance between sweet and sour and a light touch of rosemary. The Sea Chic was faultless (smoked salmon, dill cream, rose berries and lemon, €9.40) and delighted the children.On the sweet side, it’s hard to imagine a more gourmand dessert that the Teddy Breizh (€10.90): two crêpes buried under a mountain o

  1. 11 rue Grégoire de Tours, 6e
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Le Café du Marché

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 1/4
  • Critics choice

This well-loved address is frequented by trendy locals, shoppers hunting down a particular type of cheese and tourists who've managed to make it this far from the Eiffel Tower. Le Café du Marché really is a hub of neighbourhood activity. Its pichets of decent house plonk always go down a treat, and mention must be made of the food - such as the huge house salad featuring lashings of foie gras and parma ham.

  1. 38 rue Cler, 7e
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Bal Café

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 1/4
  • Critics choice

While you're here, enjoy an exhibit at the BAL, the Parisian temple of the documentary image. The team is young, cheerful and cosmopolitan; the décor is warm and the food delicious. The cooks here cut their teeth at the lauded Rose Bakery and all the ingredients are carefully chosen. For brunch, porridge, scones, bacon and other UK-inspired dishes jostle for space on the menu. But be careful: space is limited and reservations are not accepted. Of course, if you have to wait for a table, you can always check out one of the excellent exhibits at the BAL, Paris’s museum of documentary photography, film and new media – or leaf through one of the works in the arty bookshop next door. Or maybe it’s best just to get there early.    

  1. 6 impasse de la Défense, 18e
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Users say

1 comments
Paul
Paul

some restos good for kids and parents in Paris