Arts & Entertainment

Your complete guide to Kuala Lumpur's art exhibitions, theatre plays, musicals, comedy, movie reviews and film trailers

Film

Jewel in the crown: Jessica Jones

Ken W tells us why ‘Marvel’s Jessica Jones’ is the way forward for superhero shows.

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Latest film reviews and releases

Film

10 Cloverfield Lane

This ‘Twilight Zone’-style thriller is a film of two distinct styles. First there’s minimalist claustrophobic drama, unspooling in an underground bunker populated by mistrustful apocalypse survivors; if you’re a fan of hand-wringing and lengthy scenes of problem-solving, this is where you’ll want the film to linger.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Film

The Jungle Book

Who wanted a Disney remake of ‘The Jungle Book’? No one. Especially not one combining CGI with a real-life boy. But forget about your worries – this new version is the jungle VIP.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

Midnight Special

Lately, indie directors have been paying homage to the blockbusters of their childhoods with films putting the acting and emotion first. (See Ryan Coogler’s ‘Rocky’ sequel ‘Creed’ and producer JJ Abrams’s ‘10 Cloverfield Lane’).

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Film

The Huntsman: Winter's War

Mirror mirror on the wall, what’s the fairest sequel of them all? Not this follow-up to ‘Snow White and the Huntsman’, which starred Kristen Stewart as Snow White and Charlize Theron as her hot evil stepmother. ‘Winter’s War’ is hammily entertaining, but at points feels like a Russian oligarch has thrown a ‘Game of Thrones’ party and bunged his favourite Hollywood actors a few million quid each to come in fancy dress.

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
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See all Time Out film reviews

Film and TV features

Film

Jewel in the crown: Jessica Jones

It was not meant to be this way. Superhero shows are many things: campy (‘The Flash’), self-serious (‘Arrow’), erratic (‘Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD’) and mildly entertaining (‘Supergirl’), but important, powerful and groundbreaking? Those are adjectives reserved for the iconic, earthy likes of ‘The Wire’, ‘Mad Men’, ‘Breaking Bad’ and ‘The Sopranos’… until ‘Marvel’s Jessica Jones’ premiered on Netflix last November, that is. A critically lauded Netflix original series starring an inspired Krysten Ritter of ‘Don’t Trust the B---- in Apartment 23’ fame in the titular role, ‘Jessica Jones’ is less a superhero drama than a drama that happens to have a superhero at its core. Although the series shares the same Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers films, Jessica’s New York is a lot less fantastical and reminiscent of the dark, grim cityscape from Netflix’s last Marvel collaboration, ‘Daredevil’. While most superheroes have a tragic past (rich college kid is left stranded on a deserted island after getting it on with his girlfriend’s sister on his father’s doomed yacht is decidedly not one of them – sorry ‘Arrow’), Jessica has had a tough ride since, as a teenager, she survived the car crash that killed her family and also inadvertently granted her superhuman strength and an uncanny ability to jump enormous heights. Her world is turned upside down when she meets a smitten Kilgrave (played with sinister aplomb by David Tennant) – season one’s Big Bad whose powers of persuasion

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Film

Brie Larson interview

Brie Larson spoke to a trauma specialist and a nutritionist, and took a month-long vow of silence before playing the role of Joy (based on the book ‘Room’), who is kidnapped by a stranger, locked in a dingy garden shed and repeatedly raped. After two years of captivity, Joy gives birth to a son, Jack (Jacob Tremblay), who is five when we drop into their lives as Joy is plotting escape. You play a woman, Joy, who has been locked away for seven years. How did you get your head around how those years had affected her, physically and mentally? It took me almost nine months and a lot of brainpower. Even just thinking about the wear and tear to her body. It’s not as simple as thinking: how long would her hair have grown? You have to realise that she doesn’t get any vitamin D. Her nutrition is poor. She doesn’t have any shampoo. In those circumstances hair doesn’t keep growing – it dissolves and dries and falls out. She’s also given birth to a son. How did you begin to understand what it would be like to become a mother in captivity? I took a month off in silence at home. When you eliminate all stimuli, your brain is like: ‘Finally, we’ve got some space! I want to talk with you about something!’ And what did your brain want to talk to you about? I was reminded of my childhood when I was seven and my mom packed up our old Mercedes and we drove from Sacramento to Los Angeles because I wanted to be an actor. We moved into a studio, about twice the size of the room in ‘Room’. We had a b

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Film

Netflix original series to watch this year

The video streaming service’s mega expansion to over 130 countries including Malaysia could only mean that we’re in danger of becoming couch potatoes… but in a good way because of all the great shows on offer. We still can’t be sure if we’ll have access to the complete US or regional catalogue but if we ever do, these are the new shows we’re most looking forward to. Netflix's basic package starts from RM33; premium from RM51, with a first month free trial for all packages. For more info, visit netflix.com/my.

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Film

Leonardo DiCaprio interview

'Hi, I’m Leo.’ In a hotel room in London, Leonardo DiCaprio walks over from the window where he’s been puffing on an electronic cigarette. He’s smiling. A good sign. The actor is famously private and once walked out on a journalist who was rude to him. At 41, he is no longer the impossibly beautiful boy he was in ‘Romeo + Juliet’ and ‘Titanic’. I’m more dazzled by his knitwear than his looks – he’s wearing a navy blue cashmere jumper so expensive and soft that I have to resist the temptation to stroke his arm. DiCaprio is a man with a lot to smile about. 2016 belongs to him. After being nominated four times for an Oscar, there’s a very strong chance he will walk up the aisle in February to pick up the Best Actor award for ‘The Revenant’. The film is set in 1823, and he plays real-life frontiersman Hugh Glass, left for dead in the Rocky Mountains by his hunting party. Directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu (‘Birdman’), it’s a brutal, raw revenge drama that puts Glass through the wringer: attacked by a bear; mauled by Tom Hardy (who, let’s face it, is scarier than a grizzly); buried alive; so cold he sleeps in the still-steaming carcass of a horse. Yes, it’s acting – but DiCaprio also lived it. The nine-month shoot in Canada and Argentina was so tough that some of the crew have described it as ‘a living hell’. Everyone talks about how down-to-earth DiCaprio is. I’m not sure that’s true. How down-to- earth can you be when you’ve been one of the world’s most famous actors sinc

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